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2nd SATA drive detected in BIOS but NOT in Windows Disk Management

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December 19, 2007 9:23:15 PM

I have an Intel D915GEV motherboard with the latest bios. My primary hard drive is a Seagate 200GB SATA (ST3200822AS) and I have Windows XP MCE 2005 SP2 running off of it. I just added a second SATA hard drive, a 500GB Seagate (ST3500631NS). This second hard drive gets detected in the bios and even gets detected by SpinRite 6.0 when I boot up. However, it's not showing up anywhere in Windows. It's unformatted, unactivated, so I don't expect it to show up in Windows Explorer, but it's not even in Device Manager or Disk Management. I tried changing to a different SATA port, even used three different SATA cables, but to no avail. I've also done all Windows Updates and tried to update my IDE/SATA drivers from Device Manager.

Any ideas please?
December 19, 2007 9:47:24 PM

Try running the install/diagnostic/repair software from Seagate
December 19, 2007 10:45:14 PM

do you mean run that on Windows? What will that solve if Windows doesn't even detect the drive? HDTune doesn't see the drive either...
Related resources
December 19, 2007 11:01:14 PM

The software is designed specifically to identify and address hdd problems. All hdd mfg have this software, which is why you need to get it from the hdd mfg website. Most have one you can run off Windows and a 2nd version to run off a floppy. If you have a floppy, I'd use that. If the software doesn't find the hdd, then either there is a lose cable or the drive is toast.
May 24, 2009 7:15:50 PM

I am also facing the same problem, Detecting in BIOS but not detecting in Windows or disk management .The OS is Windows Xp with SP 3.My secondary SATA HD is Maxtor 250 GB. Any reason why not detecting it.

Jose
a c 342 G Storage
May 25, 2009 9:11:25 PM

The problem may be you're not looking in just the right spot . Click Start, RIGHT-click My Computer in the window, then click on Manage from the menu. In the new Computer Management window expand "Storage" if necessary and click on Disk Management. I expect OP (damaster) and joses both have got this far. Now, examine the TWO right-hand panes. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one, which SCROLLS, also shows you other devices Windows does not yet understand. Your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info. RIGHT-click on it and, from the menu, choose to Partition the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.
August 25, 2009 6:24:00 AM

I have this issue as well. Drive is recognized correctly in bios, is listed correctly as a HDD in device manager, but is not found in disk management. Western Digital's data recovery tool cannot detect the drive either. Windows update says that the installed drivers for it are current. No raid controller for the mobo, although sata, chipset and other assorted mobo drivers are current.

OS: XP SP2
Mobo: Gigabyte P35 DS3L (F9)
HDD: WD10000LSRTL (WD Caviar Black 1TB Sata)
September 4, 2009 4:21:55 PM

Any follow-up on this? I have the same issue. I have three SATA drives installed just fine -- two Seagates and a Maxtor. I added a fourth SATA drive (also Seagate), and it does post to the SAS utility during boot, so the BIOS sees it.

And yet, Win XP does not see it. It's not listed in the Disk Management tool, nor in Device Manager or the system info -- even Seagate's SeaTools does not see the drive.

I have switched cables with one of the other working drives, effectively switching their positions in the list, but to no avail.

One last desperate attempt was to try the install CD for Windows 7 RC, which is the main reason I installed this drive n the first place - for the alternate OS. It did not see it, either. Foo!

Ideas?

- John
a b G Storage
September 4, 2009 5:03:34 PM

try the drive in another computer.

also try disconnecting all the drives (note which was plugged in where)

and just try the new drive.. and try installing windows on it

from there... not sure where to go.. list your full system specs.
September 6, 2009 9:11:31 AM

you gotta go into windows and format the hard drive to use it!

im using vista right now.. so intructions are: control panel > administrative tools > computer management > Storage (tab) > Disk Management (sub-tab)

from there, you should see the new hard drive.. you have to partition it (if you want) and format it to use it! you can also specify the drive label..

in xp, it should be pretty similar..
Anonymous
a b G Storage
September 7, 2009 7:31:14 AM

I am user, not an expert, but i decided to install my own second drive (Hitachi 500 gb) in my Dell Dimension 9200 running Vista Home Premium by myself.

I guess this is easy stuff for you experts, but us normal people need to have all the instructions. The dell manual made it appear that all I needed to do was plug and play (after I turned the drive on in BIOS - f2 at startup, go to drives, turn the No. 2 on. After all, I did see the driver load during startup, but could not find the drive in my computer.
Drive was detected by BIOS but not by windows, That led me to this helpful forum.

aberchonbies instructions led me to the solution.

Once you get as far as he takes you, you need to click on your new drive and activate it. Then you click on more actions in the side Actions panel and run a wizard that lets you assign a drive letter and format the drive (which takes a long time).

October 25, 2009 5:06:33 PM

I just had a devil of a time trying to install a Western Digital 500 GB SATA Hard drive for similar reasons--the drive was recognized in BIOS but not by Windows. I finally found the solution at this link: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itpr.... It involves using Windows XP to format the drive! Once that's done, Windows 7 will detect the drive.
October 25, 2009 5:43:49 PM

if u have a problem with a drive requiring formatting, format it in xp :)  deos any still have this problem? if u do try win7 and vista disc and see if it show the hdd at the install process part
November 1, 2009 10:30:20 PM

I have a Hitachi Deskstar 500GB (just purchased this morning), installed and see it in bios but do NOT see it in disk management. So I can NOT format or partition. Any clue? Is this an indication of a bad hard drive
November 1, 2009 10:32:35 PM

STHellRaiser said:
if u have a problem with a drive requiring formatting, format it in xp :)  deos any still have this problem? if u do try win7 and vista disc and see if it show the hdd at the install process part


How do you format through XP other than disk management which does not recognize my new hard drive?
November 6, 2009 3:53:05 AM

Hey guys. I've got a possible solution to this.

I had this same issue. The SATA drive in BIOS appeared fine, heck, I even booted into Windows 7 setup CD and PARTITIONED and FORMATTED the drive then exited the Windows 7 setup. Guess what, it still wouldn't appear in Windows 7!

This is a bug. I wrote up a blog post about this here:
http://www.scottbuehler.com/computer-tips/windows-7-sat...

The short of it, you'll need to go into device manager and uninstall the SATA drive and then reinstall it using "Scan For Hardware Changes"

For the step by step, just visit the URL where I provided the click by click.
December 10, 2009 2:59:01 PM

Just wanted to say thanks to paperdoc - his solution was spot on the mark and really helped me - many thanks
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 30, 2009 10:31:54 PM

I have tried everyones sugestion but still no luck. I am trying to get computer to recognize drive I have a hitachi 2tb 7200rpm hard drive. i can see it in bios. however i tried everything aberchonbie and paperdoc sugested and i get the error that it can not connect to virtual disk service. please any suggestions would be greatly appreciated before i lose my mind.
January 10, 2010 1:51:37 AM

I have the exact same problem as you guys. I have two IDE Hard Drives connected to a J-Micron Raid Controller which was running them perfectly fine off of my Windows XP build two days ago. They stopped showing up when I reinstalled XP on my Sata boot drive.
After upgrading my main Sata drive to Windows 7, these two no longer show up in Device Manager, or anything at all besides the BIOS, where they show up perfectly fine.
I've gone in there and set the raid controller to IDE mode (though I've tried all the modes) to no avail. Also in the process of losing my mind. Please help.
January 13, 2010 4:48:34 AM

I had problems adding a second SATA drive in my Dell Dimension 9200. I couldn't get the computer to recognize it. I tried everything, or so I thought, then I went into the the Bios. (reboot and click f2 many times during boot up) On my motherboard there are 6 sata inputs. Only 3 of these sata inputs were "turned on" in the bios. I took a flashlight and looked closely, and written in small letters next to the connector i was using, it said "sata4" I turned it on in the bios. I rebooted... then right clicked on "my computer" and clicked on manage - went to storage devices and located my unformatted drive. I assigned it a drive number and then formatted it.

Don't assume that a hard drive is "plug n play" often they arn't. I learned a lesson, I had no idea that each individual sata input needed to be turned on in the bios...now I know.

hope this helps
January 13, 2010 5:00:09 PM

Like everyone here I have same problem. Started with WD 500 as my bootup DR.
I then tried to install a spare Seagate 250 Gig dr for a backup drive. SYS BIOS Saw
Drive but Windows7 would not. I then did the same with a Samsung 180 Gig dr.
with same results. OK 2 failed so all I left was a 80 Gig WD . I could not beleive it
worked OK. So I thought it may have been a fluke so I order another WD 500 and put it in today and it work right away. My next is to see if i can get two Seagate drives to work. TO BE CONTINUED:
January 16, 2010 12:57:48 PM

Hi guys and girls

I also have a 1 tera byte Hitachi hard drive that is seen on the initial boot up screen,but not in windows at all.

Please help me out.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE. H E L P!
Anonymous
a b G Storage
January 18, 2010 1:40:03 PM

Paperdoc said:
The problem may be you're not looking in just the right spot . Click Start, RIGHT-click My Computer in the window, then click on Manage from the menu. In the new Computer Management window expand "Storage" if necessary and click on Disk Management. I expect OP (damaster) and joses both have got this far. Now, examine the TWO right-hand panes. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one, which SCROLLS, also shows you other devices Windows does not yet understand. Your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info. RIGHT-click on it and, from the menu, choose to Partition the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.



Excellent and well described you are the man, Thankyou.
January 22, 2010 5:42:55 PM

Paperdoc said:
The problem may be you're not looking in just the right spot . Click Start, RIGHT-click My Computer in the window, then click on Manage from the menu. In the new Computer Management window expand "Storage" if necessary and click on Disk Management. I expect OP (damaster) and joses both have got this far. Now, examine the TWO right-hand panes. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one, which SCROLLS, also shows you other devices Windows does not yet understand. Your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info. RIGHT-click on it and, from the menu, choose to Partition the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.



Paperdoc, Thank you very much for this post. I just built a new system and Win 7 was't recognzing my 1.5TB second HD even though it was showing in the BIOS. I have now managed to format it thanks to your instructions. Much apprecated. SC
January 24, 2010 7:01:06 AM

Still Nothing guys..............
Anonymous
a b G Storage
January 29, 2010 2:37:07 AM

I have the same problem and none of the suggestions worked for me. The sata harddrive that I have has 250 gb and was working fine until suddenly it crashed and then windows could not load. I tried to reinstall windows but the hard drive was not detected. I used another hard drive and connected the malfunctioned hdd via e-sata cable, it is listed in bios, disc management, but not in my computer. it is a seagate 250 gb hdd, but in disc management the capacity is 55 mb! the drive does not have any name, and it is not initialized and when I try to initialize it, it says "the request could not be performed because of an I/O device error". I tried tons of recovery softwares and still nothing. I have very important data on this drive which I really need... Any suggestions?
January 31, 2010 4:37:03 PM

My problem was I can see it in BIOS, I load windows, does not show up in disk management, does not show up in device manager too, I tried rescanning in device manager, there it showed up in device manager. then rescan in disk management, that did it for me.
I'm running XP sp3, ASUS P5GC-MX mobo running AMI BIOS, the HDD I added was a Seagate Barracuda 80gb SATA, 7200.9
February 1, 2010 3:11:46 PM


Well guys if you get any good advice that WORKS please let me know......

Thanks alot guys.
a c 342 G Storage
February 1, 2010 5:37:32 PM

Deca, let's see if we can help. You said, "I also have a 1 tera byte Hitachi hard drive that is seen on the initial boot up screen, but not in windows at all. "

We'll need a little more info. I'm going to assume it is a SATA II HDD unit. What about the rest of your system?
1. What is the mobo - maker and model? Do you know whether its SATA controller system is the original SATA 1.5 Gb/s, or the newer SATA II at 3.0 Gb/s?
2. What HDD's and optical drives do you have installed already? What types (IDE or SATA or SATA II) of HDD, connected to which ports on your mobo? What about your optical drive(s) - how is it / are they connected?
3. What OS do you have installed where - Windows I presume, but which one, and with what Service Pack installed? On which drive?
4. Does the new drive have ANYTHING on it you want to preserve, or is it just empty?
5. Do you plan to move your OS to the new int and make it your boot drive? Or, is this unit to be for data only?
6. What size Partitions / Volumes do you want? Do you want to use it as one huge drive, or break it up into two or more Partitions?

This will help us customize the advice.
February 2, 2010 10:58:01 AM

1. What is the mobo - SATA II
2. What HDD's and optical drives do you have installed already? All Sata
3. What OS do you have installed where - Windows XP pro Sp 2
4. Does the new drive have ANYTHING on it you want to preserve, or is it just empty? It can be cleared!
5. Do you plan to move your OS to the new int and make it your boot drive? Or, is this unit to be for data only?- Data only
6. What size Partitions / Volumes do you want? Use it as one huge drive.
a c 342 G Storage
February 2, 2010 2:27:57 PM

OK, deca, thanks for the info.

1. Win XP does not have built-in drivers for "native Sata" or AHCI devices. So you usually have two options. One is a common one in most current mobos. Within BIOS Setup right close to where you Enable your SATA ports, there is a place to set the port's mode, and choices usually include: IDE (or PATA) Emulation, native SATA, AHCI, or RAID. You do NOT want RAID, unless your mobo is one of those that treats everything that is not plain IDE as some sub-version of RAID. IDE (or PATA) Emulation has the mobo make the actual SATA port appear to Windows to be just a plain IDE drive that it already understands, and it all works with no problems. Well, almost - to do this, you are deprived of using a few advanced features of a real SATA device. However, if you want those features, you can have them. This simply means two things: you set your mode to AHCI (preferred) or native SATA, AND you then must install in Windows the driver necessary to use that device (AHCI or SATA, as chosen). Installing a driver in Windows is a standard operation, like any other device. Where to get the driver? It may already be on a CD that came with your mobo. In fact, may of those CD's have a utility you run to select and install particular drivers, depending on your needs. Alternatively (may even be a better choice), go to the website of your mobo maker to find and download the latest updated correct driver - that is, the one BOTH for your mobo and for your OS (Win XP Pro SP2), then install it. Once that is set up, your new drive will be usable by Windows as a data drive because it will load that driver from the C: boot drive when it starts up. It just cannot be used for booting, which you do not plan to do.

2. "Usable by Windows", etc. - well, not quite yet. The BIOS will see it and, with the matching SATA port mode set and driver installed (needed if not IDE Emulation), Windows will be aware it exists as a piece of hardware, BUT it still will not show up in My Computer. You need to use Windows Disk Management to do two jobs: Partition and Format that new unit. Click on Start at bottom left and in the menu RIGHT-click on My Computer and choose "Manage" from the mini-menu to open a new window. On its left click to expand "Storage" if necessary and choose "Disk Management". This will open two panes on the right, each of them scrolling to reveal their whole contents. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one also shows you the hardware Windows can see, including some devices Windows does not yet understand. Each device is represented by a large horizontal block. On its left end is a smaller label block with things like "DISK_0", a size, and a few other bits of info. To the right will be one or more large sub-blocks representing Partitions already defined. Each of these will have a letter name like your C: drive, its size and File System, and a bit more. If there is some space not yet assigned to a Partition, it will be a block further to the right called "Unallocated Space". The main block representing your optical drive will not have all this stuff because you cannot define a Partition on such a device. Now, your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info beyond its basic label on the left end. RIGHT-click on its Unallocated Space and, from the menu, choose to Create a Partition on the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, exit out of Disk Management, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.

February 9, 2010 2:04:47 AM

Paperdoc said:
The problem may be you're not looking in just the right spot . Click Start, RIGHT-click My Computer in the window, then click on Manage from the menu. In the new Computer Management window expand "Storage" if necessary and click on Disk Management. I expect OP (damaster) and joses both have got this far. Now, examine the TWO right-hand panes. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one, which SCROLLS, also shows you other devices Windows does not yet understand. Your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info. RIGHT-click on it and, from the menu, choose to Partition the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.


This is exactly what I needed to do. Just built my own system, first time with SATA technology. This suggestion hit my problem right on. Many thanks.
February 23, 2010 8:32:53 PM

I am having a similiar problem except my D: drive which I have been using for a long time stopped showing up. Happened after my computer froze and now the system now takes a longer than usual pause between windows load screen and the welcome screen. The drive still shows in bios, but is absent from the disk management.
a c 342 G Storage
February 24, 2010 12:30:52 PM

Kendrac, it is pretty rare that a drive can show up in BIOS and NOT in Disk Management. Look carefully in Disk Management in the LOWER RIGHT pane, and scroll it to see all the hardware devices it sees. My guess is you'll see it there. It may have no drive letter assigned to it, and that can be addresses by RIGHT-clicking on it and giving it a letter name. But it may also have a File System showing as RAW, which means that some of its structure data has been corrupted and it is not recognized. If that is the case, search the web for way to fix that. Do NOT follow any suggestions to Format the drive.
February 24, 2010 5:41:25 PM

It is not shown at all in disk management. It simply disappeared that time when my computer froze and I rebooted. I tried new cables and different connections on the motherboard with same results. Except if I put the 2nd drive in a connection numbered before the drive with my OS after the initial driver loading windows does not load. If I disconnect the drive the unusually very long pause between windows loading and the welcome screen also doesn't happen.
a c 342 G Storage
February 25, 2010 12:18:58 PM

Well then, your D: drive may have developed a significant hardware fault. Go to the website of its manufacturer and download their free diagnostic utility package. Seagate has Seatools, WD has Data Lifegard. others hae their own. Personally I prefer the version that has you burn your own CD-R and then boot and run from that, completely independent of an OS on your hard drive. Run its tests and write down the info. IF you believe your HDD should be replaced under warranty, the manufacturer probably will want that info before agreeing to do that.
March 10, 2010 1:52:02 AM

When I try to initialize my SATA external drive in disk management, I'm getting "The request could not be performed because of an I/O device error". any other ideas?
a c 342 G Storage
March 10, 2010 12:17:23 PM

A few items to check:

1. Is the external disk a case and drive you purchased and assembled separately, or is it a complete unit you bought? How old is it? I am wondering whether ti is possible there is a mismatch of first- and second-generation SATA involved. Tell us the make and model number of the external drive.
2. Is the drive connected to your PC by an eSATA cable, or by a USB connection, or by Firewire?
3. If you are using eSATA, is it an eSATA port the was built into your mobo, or are you using an adapter plate on the back that plugs into one of the internal mobo regular SATA ports?
4. What make and model of mobo do you have?
5. If you have an opportunity, can you plug the external drive into another computer and see if it behaves the same?
6. What version of Windows are you using? If you are using an eSATA port built into your mobo, have you loaded any driver necessary for that port into Windows?
March 11, 2010 7:47:49 PM

I have a similar problem, I installed a secondary SATA drive (Maxtor DiamondMax plus 9) into my computer (Mobo: ASUS M2N32 SLI Deluxe, OS: XP Pro SP3). I'm planning to use it for Data Storage as one full disk. I plugged it into my computer I checked my BIOS it was there, I went onto my computer and It was split into 2 different drives (It was previously used), So I unpartitioned it and then began formatting it and just before the format finished I got an error message saying format was unsuccessful and the drive disappeared from the Disk Manager and My Computer however, it still appears in the BIOS. I've tried Using SeaTools and It only reads the functioning drive that is already installed, I tried booting with a Vista install disk to see if It can at least notice the drive and I got a blue screen, I attempted to boot with a Ubuntu install disk and got error messages as well. When the drive is plugged in it also slows down the time between the Windows loading screen and the welcome screen. I've tried using different cables (including power) and it spins up every time I turn the computer on. I'm not sure what else I can do.
a c 342 G Storage
March 12, 2010 12:23:18 PM

Your drive is having some kind of error that Windows cannot handle. Your BIOS can see it (you don't say what the BIOS Setup screens tell you about it). But the long delay as Windows is booting is what happens when Windows encounters an error checking the HDD and re-tries many times before giving up.

You say you tried Seatools and it could not find the disk. I bet you used the version of Seatools for Windows. That software would require that Windows "see" the drive in order to make it available to the software. Go to the Seagate website and download the different version called Seatools for DOS. Get the one that you burn to your own CD-R. You make that disk and then boot from it into a mini-DOS that works entirely independent of Windows or any other OS on any hard drive. It only requires that the BIOS can recognize the HDD you are trying to test. Use that disk to run tests on your used drive.

Now, I find it very interesting that originally My Computer could see it as two drives (Partitions). So at that point windows was NOT having a major problem. Then you "unpartitioned it and then began formatting it...". How? If you used Windows Disk Management to Delete ALL its partitions, one at a time, that should work. BUT you did not say that your next step was to Create a new Primary Partition on that HDD unit. That step MUST be done before you can Format the Partition. Did you do that? Give us a few of these answers for info, and try the Seatools for DOS diagnostics and tell us its output. Then we can help further.
March 14, 2010 2:11:50 PM

I found a way around this which I hope is the solution for all: You have to put any CD/DVD drives in a higher placement i.e. Drive Y and Drive Z, this can be done from Disk management, once you have done this, if the HDD is connected; reboot, and it should show as Drive D, (if you only have one previous drive), if it is not connected; shut down, connect the drive and reboot and it should be there. Once this worked for me, I tried with different drives and it worked all times, good luck>
March 17, 2010 2:50:36 PM

I was having a similar problem as others noted in this thread. My new 1.5 TB drives were recognized by my bios and raid setup bios but they were not in XP disk management. The drives were visible in my raid control software and in the safely remove hardware icon in the tray, but still not in disk management.

Flashing my bios to the latest version made me notice something about the way the raid controller was handling my drives. I noticed that if the raid controller was enabled for a port and the hard drive was not in a raid array, then the drive would not show up in disk management. Disabling the raid on the port would allow windows to see the drive and partition it.

At that point I was able to figure out that the raid controller was woring correctly and set up a mirrored array by turning on the controller on those ports and configuring the array. This then showed up in Windows correctly. I did not know that Windows and the controller would behave this way and did not find anything on the internet that would point me to this.
a c 342 G Storage
March 17, 2010 3:10:01 PM

When you add SATA drives to a machine, the BIOS and its RAID management system will recognize the hardware. If you do NOT assign these new drives to a RAID array they will just be stand-alone HDD units.

Now, IF you are using Win XP, it only understands how to use IDE (or PATA) devices. So if your SATA drives have their port modes set in the BIOS to IDE Emulation, Win XP can recognize them and they will show up in Disk Management in the LOWER RIGHT pane, waiting for you to Partition and Format them; then Windows can start to use them. On the other hand, if you set these new drives' port modes to AHCI or Native SATA, Windows cannot communicate with them. You can either change their port modes or, much better yet, you can install into Win XP the driver for AHCI devices so that it CAN use these units. NOTE that Vista and Win 7 already have the AHCI drivers and this is NOT an issue for these OS's.

But now suppose you want to use the new drives as a RAID array. To do that there are three steps, in this sequence:
1. Set the SATA port modes for the drives in question to RAID, Save and Exit.
2. During the POST screens there will be a prompt to hit a certain key to enter the RAID Setup portion of BIOS. Do that and you can use its tools to assign specific HDD units to a RAID array, then initialize it. Note that any HDD units not assigned to a RAID array will remain, by default, as non-RAID stand-alone drive units.
3. After you have booted into Windows you install the required RAID drivers in it. Note that this applies to ALL version of Windows. No version of windows has RAID drivers pre-installed. When I did this step I found that you cannot install a RAID driver in Windows unless the RAID array has already been created in the RAID Setup screens - my Windows refused to load a RAID driver with no RAID devices. Until this driver is installed, Windows cannot access the RAID array. But once the driver is installed, you may NOT have to use Disk Management to Partition and Format the RAID array. Those steps essentially have been done when the RAID Setup system created the array.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 19, 2010 7:05:27 PM

I had the same problem - BIOS is OK - Disk Management do9es ot show SATA 2 - (windows 2003) - did go to Computer -> Properties -> Hardware ->Device Manager -> Disk Drives - Right Click on Disk Drives and Scan for Hardware Changes --- OS picked the drive and life is good
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 23, 2010 11:31:46 AM

Stormraath said:
I have a similar problem, I installed a secondary SATA drive (Maxtor DiamondMax plus 9) into my computer (Mobo: ASUS M2N32 SLI Deluxe, OS: XP Pro SP3). I'm planning to use it for Data Storage as one full disk. I plugged it into my computer I checked my BIOS it was there, I went onto my computer and It was split into 2 different drives (It was previously used), So I unpartitioned it and then began formatting it and just before the format finished I got an error message saying format was unsuccessful and the drive disappeared from the Disk Manager and My Computer however, it still appears in the BIOS. I've tried Using SeaTools and It only reads the functioning drive that is already installed, I tried booting with a Vista install disk to see if It can at least notice the drive and I got a blue screen, I attempted to boot with a Ubuntu install disk and got error messages as well. When the drive is plugged in it also slows down the time between the Windows loading screen and the welcome screen. I've tried using different cables (including power) and it spins up every time I turn the computer on. I'm not sure what else I can do.


I am too facing the same problem in win 7 the hard disk is neither detecting in win 7 64 bit nor on my friends pc with windows xp 32 bit the problem is it have data also and i want it some guys suggested to reformat it using windows xp but i cant format i need it right away it is just wanted to detect by any OS to get my data Please tell me if u find any solution my id is ethicalid@gmail.com reply me back asap.
a c 342 G Storage
March 23, 2010 1:02:03 PM

ethicalid, what you describe MAY be a hard drive with significant problems. It cannot be detected by Windows, you say. But there are various places to look, and you have not told us details of all of them. So let's re-examine.

1. DO NOT REFORMAT your drive. That will most certainly destroy your data, and it may not solve your problem.
2. Go into BIOS Setup and look there whether your BIOS can detect the drive at the hardware level. On most machines, when you turn it on you hold down a key, usually the "Del" key, and wait for a few parts of the POST displays to pass by until it opens the main menu screen of BIOS Setup. Go to the place where your various hard drives are displayed - often the first set of screens. You should be able to see each HDD, and your optical drive(s), displayed separately on different ports. If the troublesome HDD is not showing up here, it has a major hardware problem because the BIOS cannot communicate with it at all. That could be a complete drive failure, or a failure of its own printed circuit board system, a bad connector cable, or even a bad connector itself. If it is not showing up, just check one more thing before you conclude the hardware is dead. Go to the BIOS screen where the port for this drive (IDE or SATA) is set up, and be SURE that port is Enabled. If not, Enable it and set its port mode to AHCI, then go back to the first screen to see if it is showing now. If you did NOT change anything in the BIOS Setup screens, simply Exit from there to finish booting. If you did change a setting, remember to use the right key to Save and Exit.
3. If your drive is showing in BIOS Setup AND its port mode is set to AHCI, the hardware is working and the problem is likely to be in some software issue between the HDD and Windows. We'll use Disk Management to examine. Click on Start and RIGHT-click on My Computer and choose Manage. In the new window expand the Storage heading if necessary and choose Disk Management. The right hand part will subdivide into two windows. The upper one will show you all the devices Windows is using and understands. The LOWER RIGHT pane shows you those PLUS some other hardware that Windows cannot use yet for whatever reason. This portion SCROLLS so you can see all of its contents. Your troublesome disk should show up there, since the BIOS can see it. Each hardware device in the LOWER RIGHT pane is represented by one larger horizontal box. Within it are a smaller box on the left end with some info about the device - type, size, etc. - and then some other sub-boxes to the right. Each of these represents one Partition on the HDD. If there is any space not assigned to a Partition, it will be represented by a box labeled "Unallocated Space". On many drives there may be only one Partition that uses up all of the HDD space. Within a Partition block will be more information. A Partition is treated by Windows as one "drive". Normally it will show you the drive's name like C:, its Volume Name like Harry's Disk or whatever you set it to be, the size of this drive, the File System it uses like NTFS, and a status like Healthy. Now look closely at that information for your troublesome disk. Does the disk have a letter name assigned to it? What does it show for the File system? Is it FAT32 or NTFS? Or, is it called "RAW"?
4. If your File System on that disk is "RAW", that means some of its basic structure information has been corrupted and that is why Windows cannot figure out how to use it. Look around these forums and elsewhere on the web for ways to fix a RAW format HDD. You usually can get it fixed so that all the information on the HDD can be used again.
5. If all the information on that troublesome disk's partition block information is OK but it merely is missing a letter name like F:, you should be able to fix it here. RIGHT-click on the Partition and choose to Change its Name. Give it any letter not already in use. Now exit out of disk Management and reboot so Windows can put this into into its Registry, and you should find the disk in My Computer again.

Whatever you find, post back here and maybe we can help further. Or if we're lucky, you will have your problem fixed and we can cheer!
March 27, 2010 10:19:55 PM

Paperdoc said:
The problem may be you're not looking in just the right spot . Click Start, RIGHT-click My Computer in the window, then click on Manage from the menu. In the new Computer Management window expand "Storage" if necessary and click on Disk Management. I expect OP (damaster) and joses both have got this far. Now, examine the TWO right-hand panes. The upper one shows you only the devices Windows already knows how to use. The lower one, which SCROLLS, also shows you other devices Windows does not yet understand. Your new disk should be here with no letter name and no info. RIGHT-click on it and, from the menu, choose to Partition the drive. You'll have a choice of how big it should be and most likely want to use all the drive in one volume. (You can use only part of the space. If you do, when you are finished come back here and find the remainder shown as "Unallocated Space". You can create a second Partition or more in it if you want.) For this first Partition, make it the Primary or Active Partition, and NOT bootable because this drive is for data only - you already have a boot drive. When all the choices are made, go ahead with the Partition operation.

When that is done, come back to this new Partition and RIGHT-click again and choose to Format it. Choose the NTFS File System option. A Quick Format will do the job in 5 to 15 minutes. A Full Format will do a Quick Format, then go though every sector of the drive and test it, marking off any faulty ones (very rare) so they won't be used. Full Format takes many hours!

When you are done, reboot and your newly prepared hard drive should show up in My Computer as an empty unit ready for use.

man today was one of those days.... i could not get my new sats drive to work, i tried every thing i know and could think of... and i looked every were on line to find info, no luck till i read ur post..... your info was right on..... i want to think you!!!!!!! :p  now i can back up my pics so on and get of this damn RC 7....... IT WORKED SO GOOD THINK YOU
March 29, 2010 12:35:41 AM

So I got my new SSD drive. I installed like the directions stated but the drive did not show up when I started windows 7 64bit.. I rebooted, Checked in the BIOS and it was there made sure it was enabled as well. booted window's and still not there. checked under device manager not found, checked through Acronis Cloning Softwear, not found. ran chkdisk still not found. So i took it out tried all SATA ports, tried all power supplies. still same story. I un hooked it and connected VIA USB and the drive was then visiable. formated drive NTSF and thought that would fix problem.. reconnected it via SATA and same story. still not found. Please help for I am at a loss on what to do now.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 30, 2010 10:05:05 PM

I also have the problem with a new SATA drive being seen in BIOS but not in Windows Device Manager. However I have cloned this new disc using Diskcopy 2.3 ( non windows cloning tool) with XP from another that is recognised when it was in Windows. Disconnecting the original source disk I can run XP on the new disc, YET it is still not recognised by Windows device manager. However the plot gets thicker....using another partition tool (Hard Disk launcher from Paragon Software) I can place another partition and format it, but only as a FAT16 or FAT32. NTFS is out of the question saying the is a 'directory structure problem' please use CHKDSK. But I can't because Windows doesn't see it!!! Am getting really p****d off with Microsoft products.

Can anyone proffer a solution? and please don't tell me to go into Device Manager. I have been in the computer industry for nigh on 40 years and this is being to baffle me.....
a c 415 G Storage
March 30, 2010 10:40:53 PM

Sometimes SATA Rev 2.0 devices aren't properly recognized by SATA Rev 1.0 controllers. Most SATA Rev 2.0 drives have a jumper that you can use to force them to use the SATA Rev 1.0 protocol to get around such issues.
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