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eSATA slow and buggy ?

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December 22, 2007 2:47:22 PM

Hello,
I have this motherboard and I have an external dissk connected via eSATA.
I think I have some issues with the eSATA connection cos when I copy a large file to the disk, the transfer speed is around
50000 KB /s Is this a normal speed foe eSATA connection ?

When I copy to the disk, the mouse lags a bit which makes the PC usage quite annoying. I ve tried to update all the motherboard's drivers but it doesnt help.

Any ideas ?

Thanks,
regards.

More about : esata slow buggy

December 22, 2007 3:25:53 PM

I forgot to say that Im on WinXP SP2.

I also realized that the HD doesnt have an icon in My Computer.

regards,
Tex
December 22, 2007 9:46:06 PM

wish i could help you. i got a computer with
eSATA, but haven't used it.

its reputation/ spec is that it's supposed to
be as fast as internal SATA.

50 MB per second is not bad. number of
files matters too.
Related resources
December 23, 2007 7:25:44 AM

Raviolissimo said:
wish i could help you. i got a computer with
50 MB per second is not bad. number of
files matters too.

Im doing the test on one big file.
The speed is ok but it's the same when I use just USB2 and I would expect the eSATA to be faster. Anyway, what is the most annoying is the mouse coursor freez when the data are being written to the disk :( 
December 26, 2007 11:00:46 AM

Raviolissimo said:

50 MB per second is not bad.


Anyway, I think 50MB /s is quite slow. Isn't eSATA II supposed to copy at 3 Gbits/s (375 MB/s ) ??
December 26, 2007 11:57:28 AM

eSata is capable of the same 3Gbits/s as internal Sata (give or take), but your hard drive is going to limit the actual rate. If you have a 2.5" hard drive you're using in this case, 50MB/s is dead on and should be between 2x and 3x as fast as USB drives using flash based storage, but no, not any faster than a 2.5" hard drive with a USB connection. It's all dependent on the hard drive at this point. Once hard drives are faster, you'll see a difference. A 2.5" solid state drive with an eSata connection is about as fast as you can get these days, but will set you back quite a bit. Even that wouldn't surpase 120MB/s, and that's assuming you've purchased a $1000 hard drive just for the little boost in speed. If you had a 3.5" Raptor or high-capacity (750GB-1TB) drive connected, you'd be somewhere in the 85MB/s range.
December 26, 2007 12:25:17 PM

The eSATA controller of that board, JMicron JMB363, is known to be a bit flakey. Try updating the drivers for it and if you are comfortable, updating the firmware.

You can try using the internal SATA controller, Intel IHCR9, via PCI bracket. It may give you slightly better transfer rate but more importantly - no interface lag.

50 MB/s is reasonable for any drive. Most consumer IDE drives have a max transfer rate at around 80 MB/s and this is only achieved when the drives are completely empty (inner spindle). As drives get full, performance drops as the drive must use the outer spindle to write the same amount of data.

September 17, 2009 9:46:12 PM

I am having a similar problem with my eSata connection. Mine is at around 200Mb/s when I transfer which is pretty good but it causes my computer to lag. Especially if im listening to music off my external drive the music is very laggy. Also when I am playing games every once in a while I will get a huge 5-10 sec lag. What could be the issue with this lag?

BTW: I have vista home premium 32bit on a ASUS N51Vn laptop
a b V Motherboard
a c 415 G Storage
September 18, 2009 6:35:05 AM

crimsonfilms said:
Most consumer IDE drives have a max transfer rate at around 80 MB/s and this is only achieved when the drives are completely empty (inner spindle). As drives get full, performance drops as the drive must use the outer spindle to write the same amount of data.
Actually it's the outermost tracks that have the greatest transfer rates. The outer tracks are longer, so you can fit more data on them. And since it takes the same amount of time for the platters to rotate regardless of which tracks you're accessing, more data on the outer tracks means more data per second --> higher transfer rates.

Optical drives (CD/DVD etc) start at the innermost tracks and work outwards to allow the player to work correctly with discs of different diameters (8cm vs. 12cm). Hard drives don't have this issue and so they start with the outermost tracks and work inwards in order to get the greatest performance without having to completely fill up the drive.
September 18, 2009 8:09:30 AM

After installing the Silicon Image 3132 driver (to connect to my WiebeTech ToughTech XE mini eSATA enclosure) I couldn’t print, copy and paste or connect to file servers. The only fix was to do a complete Archive and Install of Leopard.

http://blogs.zdnet.com/Apple/?p=1043
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