Silverstone, Corsair or OCZ?

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  1. Read this http://www.jonnyguru.com/review_details.php?id=101. Not the same voltage but the same family.

    Read this http://www.jonnyguru.com/review_details.php?id=28

    Read this http://www.3dgameman.com/content/view/9748/103/1/0/

    I would pick either the Corsair or OCZ
  2. OCZ or Corsair
  3. SilverStone is a P/S manufacturer and has been all along, the P/S you referenced from Newegg will do what you need presently and your future listed plans, it will handle with no problems.

    I would rather trust a solid grounded company like SilverStone than a memory manufacturer thats decided to jump on the P/S bandwagon, and doesn't manufacture the P/Ss themselves and have direct control over quality control like Corsair.

    I have Corsair memory in every machine I own, but I'm not going to buy a P/S from them, SilverStone would definitely be my choice.
  4. True, Corsair doesn't manufacture the PSU themselves, but they leave that to Seasonic who is one of the best PSU manufacturers. I think all 3 choices are safe. Just make sure you pick one with the amps you need.
  5. The 750w Strider appears to have similar issues.

    http://www.jonnyguru.com/review_details.php?id=43&page_num=4

    Not a big OCZ fan, from the reviews. They are not bad PSUs, but they are not up to the same standards as the Corsair PSUs.

    While it is true that Corsair does not make their own PSUs, they are all built buy Seasonic which is a fantastic PSU producer who also makes the PC Power and Cooling Silencer line.

    Note: Corsair is not a memory manufacturer either. The actual memory modules are built by 3rd parties as well as every other component.
    Perhaps a DIMM Assembler and Tester, but not a manufacturer such as Micron.
  6. zenmaster said:
    Note: Corsair is not a memory manufacturer either. The actual memory modules are built by 3rd parties as well as every other component.
    Perhaps a DIMM Assembler and Tester, but not a manufacturer such as Micron.
    I think you mean the ICs or RAMs? And, we do assemble our XMS and Dominator memory in-house. The only memory modules we buy prebuilt are our Value Select lines.

    Just in case anyone is interested:
    http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1151552
  7. ^That was pretty cool. I also had to steal a quote from one of the other posts: "If you're talking about burglary, this is why this building is guarded around the clock by angry dogs chained to even angrier dogs who are chained to gorillas we don't even feed." Redbeard
  8. We are in agreement then.
    I am referring to the actual ICs, which you link refers to as "the actual RAM" (Random Access Memory)

    You use quality memory, it's well tested after being assembled, and an excellent final product.

    I'm from back in the day when you bought the individual memory chips and pushed them one by one onto your motherboard long before DIMMs or SIMMs.

    From your Link -

    "the manufacturing area, we have huge ovens that bake the ICs onto the module. The way that DDR2 works is this. You have an IC package (the actual RAM) that sits on top of tiny, solid solder balls, which sit on top of a PCB that has appropriate divots for the balls to sit in. You then pass them through an oven, and the oven melts the solder to fasten the IC to the PCB. The oven does not get hot enough to damage the IC, just hot enough to melt the solder."
  9. PC POWER AND COOLING!
  10. Corsair on this one it has 3 12v rails.
  11. First off dude, has nothing to do with how many rails it has, rather, it has to do with how many amps the 12 volt rails can hold. Plus there is a dispute. PCPOWERANDCOOLING claims that multiple rails are inefficient because processor, which doesn't use up say the 12 amps on the rail it occupies ties that rail up so it can't help other rails feed the components such as the rail on which the GPU lies.

    I am quite persuaded by this argument.
  12. I vote Corsair as well. It's rock solid.
  13. And the Corsair does not really have 3 Rails.
    Yeah, it SAYS it has 3 rails, but it's actually a single rail just like the PC Power and Cooling Silencer. Same for most of the Seasonics.

    The deal is explained on one of the Seasonic Reviews at JonnyGuru.Com.

    Jonny ended up calling and Talking to Seasonic about the matter since the literature claimed 3 12v rails but disecting it clearly showed one.
  14. I should have said the specs showed three 12 volt rails with 18AMPS on each one.
  15. zenmaster, I'm not sure if you were indicating that was a problem or not, but it's actually a common practice. The 20A limit is only a suggestion, a precaution for safety. A lot of manufacturers list separate rails but the electronics turn out to be fewer rails than shown on the sticker.
  16. Corsair 'cause Seasonic makes their PSUs.
  17. ==== a precaution for safety ===

    What's a little white lie between friends? You get a warning on the PSU telling you not to open it, so you're safe anyway :)
  18. aevm said:
    ==== a precaution for safety ===

    What's a little white lie between friends? You get a warning on the PSU telling you not to open it, so you're safe anyway :)


    Heh! These high-end manufacturers use beefy wires that can handle over 20A without being a fire hazard. At least, I hope they do... :ouch:
  19. qwertycopter said:
    Heh! These high-end manufacturers use beefy wires that can handle over 20A without being a fire hazard. At least, I hope they do... :ouch:


    That's 20A at 12V, not at 110V. It's not as bad as it looks.

    I think more houses burn down each year because idiots smoke in bed than because the PCs are too powerful. I may be wrong, I don't know...
  20. Well I still don't have one over 400 so I guess by today's standards Im a lowly peasant.
  21. No, I was not indicating it was a problem.
    It's actually a good thing.
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