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NEWSFLASH: ILLEGAL TO RIP CDS TO COMPUTER

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January 3, 2008 1:20:41 AM

I wonder if they'll actually enforce this one.
January 3, 2008 1:28:29 AM

that's complete garbage.

if they actually did enforce it, half the world would be chucked into jail.

kinda ironic, how they so love suing the artists fans. almost like they encourage you not to buy their music... and pirate it instead :D 

both are illegal anyway, so why bother paying?

---
NB - before someone lectures me, i do purchase CDs legally, but i'd be first in line to purchase a shotgun, if a RIAA moron came knocking on my door.
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January 3, 2008 1:32:12 AM

they would have trouble suing microsoft, apple, etc for including software for ripping CD's
a b G Storage
January 3, 2008 1:33:22 AM

Call me guilty because I rip all my CD's to my hard drive.

EDIT: Yeah, dmacfour, they would have to sue Microsoft because I use WMP11 to rip my CD's to the hard drive.
January 3, 2008 1:38:36 AM

I would be screwed.... I ripped 12,000 songs to my hard drive.
a b G Storage
January 3, 2008 1:49:51 AM

I've done about 5,000 myself. I mean, what's the point of buying CD's if you can't rip them to the hard drive anymore?
a b Ý World of Warcraft
a b G Storage
January 3, 2008 1:51:42 AM

Should I start saving up money for a legal defense fund?
January 3, 2008 1:53:40 AM

jaguarskx said:
Should I start saving up money for a legal defense fund?


i think the way things are going we all need to build one.

what can't you get sued for these days?

walking up to a girl and saying "hey baby" is sexual harassment.
a b Ý World of Warcraft
a b G Storage
January 3, 2008 1:58:30 AM

I think the RIAA should make it their crusade against technology. They should file a suit where all digital music players are illegal, cease production of all CDs and put an eternal ban on such technology.

They should make it their mission to revert everything back to the good 'ol classic LPs. That way if you wanna make your music portable, you will need to strap on a turn-table and listen to your LPs while walking down the street.
January 3, 2008 2:00:04 AM

They would also have to sue companies making MP3 players. I'd love, absolutely, completely love, to see the RIAA go head to head with Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, Apple, LG, Motorola, Creative, and other manufacturers.
January 3, 2008 2:06:30 AM

Does copyright law actually say anything about possession or creation of "unauthorized copies" or are they just making this up as they go? IANAL, but I think a lower court would be hesitant to make a serious amendment to copyright law, even if such a power was in its jurisdiction.
January 3, 2008 2:10:09 AM

starcraftfanatic said:
All I have to say is, Wow.....
http://www.tomshardware.com/2008/01/02/recording_indust...


Companies do not make laws (at least not directly). Only when this is ruled on as legal by a judge or legislated by your government will it be legally enforcable. A better title for your thread would be NEWSFLASH: RIAA SAYS IT IS ILLEGAL TO RIP CDS TO COMPUTER.
January 3, 2008 2:14:56 AM

Ripping your Tom Petty album to your PC must be interfering with RIAA executives' frequency or quality of sex/cocaine parties.
January 3, 2008 2:48:05 AM

I am innocent.

Ok, not THAT innocent.

But I am NOT GUILTY of copying a music CD.
January 3, 2008 2:59:10 AM

to hell with the bastards that dare try to fine me for trying to put my favorite cd's on my ipod...
January 3, 2008 3:03:23 AM

Haha this is ****ing hilarious. Both the xbox and xbox 360 have implemented software in their widespread game systems to allow users to rip music onto their hard drives. Not to mention Sony's ps3 and every damn PC in the last decade... I think its a little late to come up with this "law".
January 3, 2008 3:06:52 AM

Clearly, the governments need to updated their copyright laws to suit the digital era...

and fire the arses of the MPAA and RIAA.
a b G Storage
January 3, 2008 3:30:06 AM

I have (or had) quite a large CD collection, many dating back to early days of CD's. I HAD to transfer many of them to MP3 because CD's don't last forever; if they want to make it illegal to "Back-up" my music collection the music companies will have to agree to replace any CD's (free of charge) whenever they start to deteriorate, forever.
January 3, 2008 3:56:29 AM

This is getting ridicules, it’s been said in this thread before but, if they go through with this and it becomes illegal, they will: make fare use questionable; open the door to having any copy other then the CD Illegal; Make is so that you can’t rip your cd’s to your computer to put them on any music device; Make home stereo systems that stores music to play mostly useless; open the door to music bought (and downloaded) online, questionably illegal; make the music playing ability to most phones, PDA’s and any other electronic storage device (even some game consoles) mostly useless; bring into question the ability to use computers to play the music they can play; make it impossible for online radio stations to play music (since many use a high compression program to store and broadcast music); and drive many customers away from those companies that participate or associate with the RIAA.
January 3, 2008 4:20:27 AM

Gold dragon was right on the spot.
January 3, 2008 4:33:23 AM

I actually read the brief, the shared folder they are talking about is a kazzaa folder. The objection the RIAA had was to the sharing of the files not the ripping. The RIAA had a security company actually download files from the computer in question. No where does it say simply ripping CDs is illegal. Although, random RIAA and recording execs have muttered such nonesense before.
January 3, 2008 5:51:34 AM

newbeh said:
to hell with the bastards


+1

newbeh said:
my ipod...


-1

...I HATE Ipods! lol

Best,

3Ball
January 3, 2008 6:25:38 AM

starcraftfanatic said:
All I have to say is, Wow.....
http://www.tomshardware.com/2008/01/02/recording_indust...


No, you're title is wrong, ripping CD's to your computer for personal use is still legal under "fair use" policies. The RIAA is trying to find a different angle to challenge "fair use" because it's always been shot down on this front. The RIAA says nearly everything is illegal.

But if a book publisher tried to tell you it's illegal to read a book at the library, would you believe it? Fair Use is even less liberal than that because it applies to only a single person-you.
January 3, 2008 6:42:14 AM

justtom said:
I actually read the brief, the shared folder they are talking about is a kazzaa folder. The objection the RIAA had was to the sharing of the files not the ripping. The RIAA had a security company actually download files from the computer in question. No where does it say simply ripping CDs is illegal. Although, random RIAA and recording execs have muttered such nonesense before.


Well, at least one person caught what the issue actually was... A shared folder. Be it a shared folder on a home network, or on a university network, or on a P2P system, it is shared. Moral? Don't have shared folders. If you need / are required to, don't put your pr0n or music there.

Moral 2: Get a GOOD firewall, and limit who you trust into your system. (personally, I only trust me)
January 3, 2008 7:10:25 AM

croc said:
Well, at least one person caught what the issue actually was... A shared folder. Be it a shared folder on a home network, or on a university network, or on a P2P system, it is shared. Moral? Don't have shared folders. If you need / are required to, don't put your pr0n or music there.

Moral 2: Get a GOOD firewall, and limit who you trust into your system. (personally, I only trust me)


Ah, but I think you're skipping over the problem: The RIAA is trying to undermine Fare Use by slipping one past the judge: Starting with the illegal file share and then hoping to bootstrap -any- copying of music to a hard drive in the judgement. Such trickery would be used to set a precident in future cases.
January 3, 2008 7:31:25 AM

HA HA HA HA HA, nothing in my computer is legal...not the os(s), not the software, not the games....they havent caught me yet so why should i legalize my music?!? as much as ripping cds is concerned i dont do that i only use my ipod for music. Ha ha again even if they stop these big companies from doing their heinous crimes against music, theirs always those lovable hate-able 3rd party programs...theirs my 2 cents or a load of crap
January 4, 2008 2:40:49 AM

well, if the RIAA is able to undermine far use with the help of this law suit, then even 3rd party programs would become illegal to use, and may be forced to be modified or removed.

I don't see a problem with sharing music on a home network, being that you could arguably want to be able to listen to your music anywhere in the house.

My opinion is that it should only be illegal when it's shared to someone other then the owner of the original copy/content.
January 4, 2008 3:11:24 AM

The Music Companies have been robbing consumers and artists blind for years. It's finally coming around to bite them in the caboose.

In a few more years, I wager most artists will be either independent or working for "lean and mean" record companies that embrace the internet, try to make fair and modest income off the sales, and everyone will win.

January 4, 2008 3:30:45 AM

in the last year i began ripping my legal cd's. i also began file sharing. if the riaa thinks this is whats killing them, i'll help. i want them to die. they think this will kill the music industry. it wont. it will simply force them to adjust to consumer demands. the way it should be. same with mpaa.

there will always be someone with a mic that thinks they can sing or play an instrument. but 50 and em will have to find another way out of the sewer. mabee one buisness sector will return to "do what you love and let the money come". rather than "all your media are belong to us".

same with all IP. copyrights are no longer encouraging anything. it is choking and stagnating us. look at china, toss IP out the window and watch you country prosper. i dont want to debate the lack of personal freedom. it is a simple observation. the days of college kids in a garage comming up with new tech are gone. if they tried to release it, they would be hit with multiple patent infringement suits, right out of buisness. that is, if they live in the US or country subject to copyright law[/rant]

just curious, how much of vista's code is devoted to drm? or the latest game? or any software/media?
January 4, 2008 4:28:38 AM

I want to know when companies and unions will learn that you do not mess with computer users.
They have the edge in the real world, backed with billions of dollars.

But in the digital world, they're only as good as the developer under them.

I love it when people try to battle an entire arsenal that definitely don't have bigger guns (or a means of getting them) than they do.

sorry for the sarcasm.


no cd ripping? ha. make cd rippers illegal.

it'll only ensure that 1,000 new ones pop up for download every day.
January 9, 2008 8:59:34 AM

Currently, the fair use policy allows the producer of the information in question, whether cd/dvd/etc... to be the one to decide the policy of their software/music/etc...

For example, Company A produces a CD. They don't care if you rip it. You can copy it unlimited times, for backup purposes and personal use.

Company B produces a CD, and they put the warning on the disc, that states "Do not lend or make illegal copies of this disk". This is where you could get into trouble for copying it, even to your HDD. You should read the fine print of the license agreement before making copies of these discs, to determine what the producer will allow.

This is because you are not technically purchasing the music/software/etc.... You are only licensing it, and your license can be revoked by the producer at any given time, for breach of contract. You have to read the fine print in legaleeze to catch that part... Thus, the producer can dictate how many copies you can make, and still be legal.

The biggest problem with all of this, is that we, as a society, have allowed companies, such as recording companies to dictate to us, the licenses that we can use. The negotiation system has been almost completely negated. These companies (AND the RIAA) want it this way. That way they can control their products. Imagine if we all said, "We won't purchase your product until you negotiate the license agreement with us!". After all, license agreements must be "agreed" upon by both sides of the issue...
January 18, 2008 6:12:31 PM

why cant they be like the MPAA these RIAA guys bitch too much
a b G Storage
January 18, 2008 6:28:49 PM

:lol:  They can NEVER stop people from pirating.... NEVER.... hackers are always finding ways to break copyrights, etc.

PS: Just run Linux + Proxy + IP Blocker. Gotta love Linux :D 
a b G Storage
January 18, 2008 6:31:05 PM

3Ball said:
+1



-2 [+ (-1,000,000) ] :D 

...I HATE Ipods! lol [:turpit:2]

Best,

3Ball


I hate Ipods too....
January 18, 2008 6:32:44 PM

ok, I didn’t read it but... so it is illegal for me to make a backup to my computer with the intent to never share the data and only use it for my personal use only?
January 18, 2008 6:34:34 PM

Shadow703793 said:
I hate Ipods too....


I do not just hate Ipods, but also the company that designed them (APPLE....... I wish to never utter this name). I hate them so much they I went and bought a Zune!!!
January 18, 2008 7:12:48 PM

The RIAA isn't a governing body. It has no authority to say what is legal and what isn't legal. That is up to the Congress of the State the resident resides in or the United States Congress. Just because I say its illegal to look at me, doesn't mean it actually is. In case you guys missed it there is a class action lawsuit against the RIAA for what its doing. You can read about it here:

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060313-6368.html

I personally don't rip music, nor do I download it. Not because I'm afraid, but because pandora radio is that awesome (IMHO of course).
January 18, 2008 7:14:02 PM

justtom said:
I actually read the brief, the shared folder they are talking about is a kazzaa folder. The objection the RIAA had was to the sharing of the files not the ripping. The RIAA had a security company actually download files from the computer in question. No where does it say simply ripping CDs is illegal. Although, random RIAA and recording execs have muttered such nonesense before.

Basically What I was going to say.

THEY ARE NOT SAYING RIPPING CDS IS ILLEGAL. THEY ARE SAYING RIPPING THEM AND THEN PUTTTING THEM IN A SHARED FOLDER IS ILLEGAL.

(I hate typing in caps but it's sometimes the only way to get people attention.)
January 18, 2008 7:40:51 PM

heres something of interest in Canada.... but it is 4 years old.

http://www.news.com/2100-1027_3-5182641.html


**edit**
Judge: File sharing legal in Canada

''The ruling affects only Canada, but it could have wider repercussions if it stands. The U.S.-based RIAA has filed hundreds of lawsuits against file swappers in hopes of lessening the amount of copyrighted material available for download through peer-to-peer networks such as Kazaa or Morpheus. ''
January 18, 2008 8:20:16 PM

the RIAA sucks monkey balls
January 18, 2008 8:49:08 PM

IMHO as a fmr. entertainment lawyer, it is pretty settled that this whole issue is overblown, and the RIAA was not saying that ripping your own CD is illegal (as opposed to then putting the ripped copy in Kazaa, etc.). But there are still 2 interesting points coming out of this:

1) Although the RIAA is not a governing body, they de facto have become such, because they have powerful lobbying influence, in contrast to the citizenry at large who apparently have none. Thus, it shocks me what they are able to push onto the public. (will there ever be a day when the "FBI warning" at the beginning of a movie will also include a brief statement of what your fair use rights are???)

2) Although this case is not infringing on fair use, there will come a day when the RIAA does, because a) they have no shame; and b) they have pretty much gotten what they wanted so far, why stop now...

Because... There will be little reason for citizens to keep buying music going forward. a) we can make back up copies, so we will not have to replace "worn out" copies (!) of music we already own; and b) the trend is for LOWER quality music reproduction (e.g., MP3 is lower quality than CD music). In contrast to paying more money to go up in quality (e.g., to go from tape to CD), we won't need to pay anything to go down in quality (from already owned CD to an MP3). The music industry could have delayed this inevitable for another decade or two by fully embracing high resolution audio such SACD/DVD-A and forcing us to upgrade once again. But they were too risk averse (dumb?) to even do that.
January 18, 2008 9:37:15 PM

Quote:

I HAD to transfer many of them to MP3 because CD's don't last forever; if they want to make it illegal to "Back-up" my music collection the music companies will have to agree to replace any CD's (free of charge) whenever they start to deteriorate, forever.


of course, i think that making backups should be fair use. having said that, the argument above isn't compelling given that media isn't warranted to last forever. further, typical lifetimes of various media are widely known. as long as the content is usable during the medium's typical lifetime, you've received what you paid for (and knew you were paying for). otherwise, i have some LPs, videotapes, photographic prints, magazines and newspapers that i want replaced for free - forever.

on the other hand, software vendors frequently replace licensed software if media becomes unusable, for not much more than the cost of new media. perhaps that should be the parallel requirement placed upon music publishers.

January 21, 2008 6:59:37 PM

Quote:
I mean, what's the point of buying CD's if you can't rip them to the hard drive anymore?
True that. Who walks around with a CD player anymore? Maybe the Amish, pshh....
January 21, 2008 7:36:28 PM

The best part of the article....

RIAA
The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry.

They are nothing to us in Canada.
January 22, 2008 4:22:48 PM

What you all REALLY need to be asking yourselves is how many of those RIAA bastards have MP3 players of their own? ;p
Anonymous
January 22, 2008 4:42:18 PM

Ahahaaaaaa they are ignorant to the law. Ripping your own paid for music to your own computer or MP3 device is not making illegal copies. All it is doing is changing the format of the music. Making illegal copies is selling another one-to-one copy of it at a street corner or ripping it and selling it over the internet. Those who share the music over a p2p are the ones breaking the law. I guess you can look at it 2 ways is the person sharing it breaking the law or the personal downloading it for free?
Personally its both people I would guess just in different aspects/viewpoints of the law. But for this legal battle they are waging, I LAUGH !!!
a b G Storage
January 22, 2008 4:58:31 PM

I guess we should take turns going to jail. There is not enough room for all of us.
What about all the iPods and Zunes in the world?
January 22, 2008 5:11:34 PM

MrLinux said:
I have (or had) quite a large CD collection, many dating back to early days of CD's. I HAD to transfer many of them to MP3 because CD's don't last forever; if they want to make it illegal to "Back-up" my music collection the music companies will have to agree to replace any CD's (free of charge) whenever they start to deteriorate, forever.


wrong. you are expected to re-purchase the cd every time it deteriorates... you are stealing money out of their pocket every time you backup your own music collection.
Also, if you wish to listen to your music on any other device than a cd player. you must pay for it again for what ever format you require. No Converting your music, yet again your stealing money out of their pockets!....
:pt1cable: 

One of these days the RIAA is going to bite off more than it can chew. and i will be there laughing at them.
!