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September 8, 2007 12:55:13 PM

Is it safe to use the ntune autotune for ocing? or does nvidia have no idea how to oc?

More about : ntune

September 8, 2007 1:32:47 PM

it'll work i havent used ntune its self but i have used coolbits reg mod so you can overclock it through you gfx driver.
Edit: be sure to drop the clocks back a bit if you see random lines etc.
a c 173 Î Nvidia
September 8, 2007 1:51:00 PM

I prefer Rivatuner myself.
Related resources
September 8, 2007 2:10:56 PM

@shargrath: I maxxed my OC on nTune, and sometimes, rarely, I get some random lines, but maybe it is the game or driver. I am using the latest non-beta driver.

Core bus: 640Mhz, Memory bus: 962. Is this too ambitious? I only get 74C in a very warm room (no AC) under LOAD (Oblivion maxxed @ 1440x900). I am pretty sure that the temps are the only way you can damage a card, unless you know otherwise, let me know. So this looks conservative from a temp standpoint.

Also, I want to know how I can lock in a profile, I am sick of loading my profile before gaming, I just want to keep it overclocked. When I reboot it loads stock clocks, so annoying.

Also, I want to go 640/960 not 962 for a perfect ratio, but it won't let me fine tune that well. How can I do it??

Should I just go Rivatuner? Is it good?

Sorry for the thread highjack, was hoping shargrath could help us both, again sorry
a c 173 Î Nvidia
September 8, 2007 2:27:20 PM

Falken699 said:
@shargrath: I maxxed my OC on nTune, and sometimes, rarely, I get some random lines, but maybe it is the game or driver. I am using the latest non-beta driver.

Core bus: 640Mhz, Memory bus: 962. Is this too ambitious? I only get 74C in a very warm room (no AC) under LOAD (Oblivion maxxed @ 1440x900). I am pretty sure that the temps are the only way you can damage a card, unless you know otherwise, let me know. So this looks conservative from a temp standpoint.

Also, I want to know how I can lock in a profile, I am sick of loading my profile before gaming, I just want to keep it overclocked. When I reboot it loads stock clocks, so annoying.

Also, I want to go 640/960 not 962 for a perfect ratio, but it won't let me fine tune that well. How can I do it??

Should I just go Rivatuner? Is it good?

Sorry for the thread highjack, was hoping shargrath could help us both, again sorry

I you do try Rivatuner you will have to turn off Ntune and Coolbits, but I have never had a problem with Rivatuner not starting up on a reboot.
September 8, 2007 2:41:12 PM

Mouse: I mean it always defaults to default profile, I have to load my profile that has my OC or manually set the slider, bum install??

Also, do you know if my temps are ok I shouldn't worry about minor artifacts once in a while? Or is there more to vcard damage...

Gawd, this is now a classic thread highjack, I feel like such a bum
a c 173 Î Nvidia
September 8, 2007 2:53:07 PM

Falken699 said:
Mouse: I mean it always defaults to default profile, I have to load my profile that has my OC or manually set the slider, bum install??

Also, do you know if my temps are ok I shouldn't worry about minor artifacts once in a while? Or is there more to vcard damage...

Gawd, this is now a classic thread highjack, I feel like such a bum

Ntune = poo poo, I used it once and did not like it at all, for the very same reason. Rivatuner can be set to run your OC profile on machine startup and has never failed me. The temps for your card are fine, but if you push the GPU or vRAM further than it can handle you will get artifacting regardless of temps.
September 8, 2007 3:07:00 PM

I use ATITool for ocing my 8800 GTX, then nbitor to flash the bios to the 8800 Ultra, AFTER I was sure the card could take that much in an oc.

Once flashed, it runs at the set values until you flash the bios back to stock.

Now for cpu OC, use the bios instead of ntune. I get much better and more stable OC using the direct bios changes vs the ntune utility on my 680i board.
September 8, 2007 3:07:28 PM

Mouse: "The temps for your card are fine, but if you push the GPU or vRAM further than it can handle you will get artifacting regardless of temps." But this wouldn't damage the card if temps are ok, right? Just a nuisance/stability thing?
September 8, 2007 3:10:25 PM

Fairly easy step by step- copied from somewhere, but I hit 3.3 with my e6750 and stopped.

The multiplier and Front Side Bus
We're about to introduce two terms that are absolutely fundamental in understanding the speed of your Core 2 Duo. The first is the frontside bus - this refers to the data bus on the PC's motherboard, which connects the CPU to all of the other devices in the system. On Core 2 Duo systems, the default speed is 266MHz - but this is "quad-pumped" to give it a final speed of 1066MHz. The frontside bus can be adjusted, and thanks to this we can overclock the CPU. The other term is the Multiplier. Each Core 2 Duo chip has a fixed multiplier (except the expensive e6800), meaning it can't be raised. The speed of a CPU is determined by multiplying the frontside bus speed by the multiplier. Our 2.4GHz e6600 Core 2 Duo, using a default 266MHz frontside bus, has a locked multiplier of 9. 9 x 266MHz = 2400MHz, or 2.4GHz, which is the speed of the CPU. Pretty easy, eh?

The following table shows the multipliers for the common Core 2 Duo CPUs on the market:

CPU Name Speed FSB speed Multiplier
e6300 1.86GHz 266MHz 7
e6400 2.13GHz 266MHz 8
e6600 2.4GHz 266MHz 9
e6700 2.66GHz 266MHz 10
e6800 2.93GHz 266MHz 11


As mentioned, we can't increase the CPUs multiplier… but we can change the frontside bus. On the e6600 that we overclocked, we managed to get a final stable frontside bus of 378MHz. Multiply that by the default multiplier of 9x that the e6600 has, and we end up with a final CPU speed of just over 3.4GHz. Now that we've shown you a few key basics, let's delve into the bright blue BIOS zone and show you exactly how to overclock your CPU.

Ingredients
Here's the exact list of components used in this guide:
Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 2.4GHz
Default Intel heatsink
2 x 1GB G.Skill DDR2-800 memory
eVGA 8800GTX video card
eVGA 680i SLI motherboard
Topower 550W PSU
Antec P180 case
Windows Media Centre Edition

As you can see, we didn't use a high end HSF on our setup. We had purchased the Scythe Ninja HSF, but difficulties in setting it up meant we had to resort to the standard Intel HSF that ships with the CPU. However, the Ninja will be going in soon, as the Intel cooler is struggling with our overclocked speed. We used the 680i motherboard, as it's arguably the simplest to overclock with, due to the way it handles memory speeds. And we like simple. We'll delve into that in a bit.

While our motherboard supports NVIDIA's nTune application, which supposedly allows access to all the necessary fiddly bits from Windows, we ended up using the BIOS at boot up, as it was much more reliable. To access your PC's BIOS, hit the delete key when the PC first boots up. You'll soon be bathed in the warm blue glow of the BIOS area. Please bear in mind that the names for the various settings might differ from motherboard to motherboard, but they should be similar.

Step 1
Before we start to bump up the frontside bus, we first need to disable a few settings that can hinder the overclocking performance. Most of these are to do with the temperature monitoring and power saving features of the Core 2 Duo. From the main BIOS screen, head to "Advanced Chipset Features" and then into "CPU configuration". Change the following settings:

CPU Thermal control - disabled
C1E Enhanced holt state - disabled
Intel Speedstep - disabled

Save all settings and then reboot your PC. Enter the BIOS again.



Step 1.Step 2
We've still got a few more features that need disabling yet. Head to the "Advanced Chipset Features" area, but this time delve into the "System Clocks" area. Change the following settings:

CPU Spread Spectrum - disabled
HT Spread Spectrum - disabled
PCIe Spread Spectrum SPP - disabled
PCIe Spread Spectrum MCP - disabled
Sata Spread Spectrum - disabled

Save all settings and then reboot your PC. Enter the BIOS again.

Step 2.Step 3
We're almost there. But before we start to gradually increase the frontside bus speeds, we need to give the system some more juice. It's just like modifying a race car - the faster it's going to go, the more powerful the fuel it's going to need.

Enter the "Advanced Chipset Features" and then head to "System Voltages". The following voltages are recommended by NVIDIA to get the most out of this chipset, though we've lowered the CPU voltage a little bit. Be warned, if you pump more power in than we've recommended, be prepared for the sweet, sweet smell of burning hardware.

CPU Core: 1.45V
CPU FSB: 1.5V
nForce SPP: 1.50V
Memory: Set to the voltage required by your chosen memory modules. For the purposes of this tute we will not be overclocking the memory, so the default voltage should be fine.
Save all settings and reboot your PC once again. Before we progress to the next stage, head into the BIOS again and now head into the system monitoring area of your BIOS. Have a look at the CPU temperature - if your HSF is properly installed, it shouldn't be above 65C. If it is higher than this you've probably not installed the HSF correctly, and should check it.

Step 3.

◄ Previous 1 2 3 Next ►

Step 4
One more setting to go before we can start increasing the frontside bus. As the memory speed is tied into your frontside bus, we need to stop it from increasing as the frontside bus increases. If we don't do this, your memory will crap out before the frontside bus, bringing your overclock to a halt. By now you're probably quite familiar with the "Advanced Chipset Features" section of the BIOS - head there again, and this time go into the "FSB & Memory Config" section.

Make sure the SLI-Ready Memory is set to disabled, then change "FSB - Memory clock mode" to Unlinked. This allows you to manually set the memory speed to whatever you want. On our machine, which is using DDR2-800 memory, we set "MEM (DDR) MHz" to 800 to reflect this memory speed. If you're using slower DDR2- 667, change this setting to 667 instead. Hit F10 to save all settings and then reboot.

It's in this regard that the 680i chipset we're using is quite different to other Core 2 Duo motherboards, such as the Intel 965 and 975-based motherboards. These other motherboards use a memory ratio to figure out the memory speed, which is slightly trickier to figure out. If using one of these boards, you'd need to pick a memory ratio that will keep your memory speed as close to default as possible, taking into account the frontside bus you'll be using. However, we haven't overclocked on these boards, so you'll need to look into that yourself. Google is your friend!



Step 4 and 5.Step 5
Finally, it's time to give your CPU a good kick in the pants. We're going to slowly start increasing the frontside bus to see just what the CPU is capable of. Notice how we said slowly? If you feel like tripling your frontside bus immediately and don't understand why your computer is now an expensive paperweight, don't say we didn't warn you.

Head to, you guessed it, "Advanced Chipset Features" and back into the "FSB & Memory Config" area. You'll see an area labelled FSB (QDR), MHz, and this represents your frontside bus. Remember that we mentioned that the frontside bus in this system is "quad pumped"? That explains why the reading here is actually four times what our frontside bus is. The default value is 1066MHz, which is 4 x 266MHz. Start increasing this in 40MHz increments, so change it to 1104MHz (4 x 276MHz) or so. After each increase, save your changes, and then allow the PC to boot all the way into Windows. If it can make it into Windows, reboot and increase the frontside bus speed from the BIOS by another 40MHz. Eventually you'll reach a point where the machine won't boot into Windows any more.

Once that happens, lower the frontside bus back to the last setting, and then boot into Windows. Download an application called SP2004 Orthos Edition and run it in CPU stress test mode. This free program puts your CPU under immense strain, ensuring that it's stable at your chosen speed. Keep an eye on your temperatures - ideally you don't want it to hit 70c. If it's getting too hot, look to replace the HSF with a custom, enthusiast-level solution, or lower your CPU voltage.

By using the steps above, we found a stable frontside bus for e6600 of 378MHz, which gave us a final clock speed of 3.4GHz. Not too shabby for a few hours work - as mentioned before, it's actually not even possible to buy a CPU at this speed yet. Once you've found the best speed for your CPU, it's time to head back to the voltage section. Slowly start lowering your voltages, Orthos testing each time, until you can find the lowest necessary voltage for your overclock. This will help to remove heat from the equation.

And there you have it - a very simple way of overclocking your Core 2 Duo processor on the 680i chipset. Once you've figured this out, you can delve into the lowering of multipliers, which allows you to get a higher frontside bus speed (we said previously that multipliers on Intel chips are locked, which isn't strictly true. They can actually be lowered). You can also overclock your memory, which is next on our list of things to do.

If you keep an eye on temperatures and don't go crazy with the voltages, it's highly unlikely you'll cause any damage to your motherboard. In our years of overclocking we've never fried a single chip. Having said that, if you do, please don't come crying to us - you have been warned. And if you're looking for advice about why your board didn't boot, again, Google is your best friend!
September 8, 2007 3:10:53 PM

granite3: Now this is getting REALLY interesting, would you "unlock" shaders with the Ultra bios if you can handle Ultra+ OC??

My palms are sweating!!! Mouse what do you think???

I use Bios for OC on my Opteron, don't trust any apps.

Guys this info is great, I am a bit out of my league on videocard stuff, thanks for your posts!!!! :) 
a c 173 Î Nvidia
September 8, 2007 3:39:35 PM

Falken699 said:
Mouse: "The temps for your card are fine, but if you push the GPU or vRAM further than it can handle you will get artifacting regardless of temps." But this wouldn't damage the card if temps are ok, right? Just a nuisance/stability thing?

I have never ascertained whether artifacting in it's self damages the card, but it is the first sign of things not being good, therefore artifacts = bad so downclock until they cease, reflashing the BIOS however is not for the fainthearted regardless of how many success stories you may read, or 'simple' guides and 'easy to use tools' you may find, put simply, get it wrong and your card is dead!
September 8, 2007 3:43:58 PM

Thanks mouse!!

-This is not the end of thread, highjacked by Falken699, see top-
September 8, 2007 7:23:32 PM

Falken699 said:
granite3: Now this is getting REALLY interesting, would you "unlock" shaders with the Ultra bios if you can handle Ultra+ OC??

My palms are sweating!!! Mouse what do you think???

I use Bios for OC on my Opteron, don't trust any apps.

Guys this info is great, I am a bit out of my league on videocard stuff, thanks for your posts!!!! :) 


The ultra is just a fast GTX, unlike the GTS which is slower and has different hardware from a GTX.

So no extra shaders...
!