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Want to bring data from on old hd to a new hd

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February 4, 2008 5:11:52 AM

I will be building a new pc in the coming days. I have an old PATA interface hard-drive which contains around 40gb of data that I want to bring onto my new hard-drive which is going to be SATA. What is the most efficient way to go about doing this? My new mobo will have at least 1 place to plug in a PATA interface device, but I'm not sure if you can simply plug it in and move the data to the new HD due to the fact that Windows is already installed on the older hd. I will be installing the same version of windows on the new HD as the old HD. I basically want to avoid potentially harming my new HD with any garbage my old HD may have on it, I know it is virus-free, well my scanner tells me so anyways, but I still want to start fresh. Any light that can be shed on this situation or any questions regarding it will be very much appreciated.

More about : bring data

February 4, 2008 6:37:31 AM

new drive in, install windows, put old drive in make sure boot drive is set to the new drive, copy over data.

Done, or use what hcforde suggested..
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February 4, 2008 6:49:24 AM

dmeyer85 said:
I will be building a new pc in the coming days. I have an old PATA interface hard-drive which contains around 40gb of data that I want to bring onto my new hard-drive which is going to be SATA. What is the most efficient way to go about doing this? My new mobo will have at least 1 place to plug in a PATA interface device, but I'm not sure if you can simply plug it in and move the data to the new HD due to the fact that Windows is already installed on the older hd. I will be installing the same version of windows on the new HD as the old HD. I basically want to avoid potentially harming my new HD with any garbage my old HD may have on it, I know it is virus-free, well my scanner tells me so anyways, but I still want to start fresh. Any light that can be shed on this situation or any questions regarding it will be very much appreciated.


If you know where and what data you want to move is located, it is trivial. As yay said, install new drive, get OS installed, make sure that the new drive is the primary boot in your bios. Reboot, re-check your bios (with some MB's a newly introduced drive may show up as the primary boot) make changes as required, finish your boot then copy your old data over to your new drive.
February 4, 2008 7:37:52 AM

Easy answer.

Option 1. Move the jumper on the PATA HDD to slave. Plug it in. Enter BIOS, make sure the boot drive is set as your SATA. Boot PC, if it pops up for a disk check, DO NOT let it run (press any key to cancel). I repeat DO NOT let it run! Log in, then transfer files.

Option 2. Buy an external usb drive cage, install the PATA drive into it, boot to windows, connect drive, start transfer.
February 4, 2008 7:59:45 AM

Programs may or may NOT run properly if you just try to move the folders to a new drive. You will have to reinstall the programs. Some of them use the registry. You use the term DATA but it is also on the drive you have the OS, so I am assuming there is data plus applications also.
a b G Storage
February 4, 2008 10:45:58 AM

hcforde has a good point. When we heard the word DATA, we are all used to thinking in terms of Office, graphics, or video files. A lot of MS stuff, such as Outlook or OE mail files are tied to the registry.

I am a USENET junky. I use Agent for a newsreader. Those files are useless without the application.

IH8U's suggestions have problems.
Option 1: Most harddrives have three positions for the jumper, one for master, slave, and single device. Do what the label on the drive says. It MAY work in SLAVE, but it might not. YMMV.
Option 2: If you are going to do this, be careful. USB drive cages now come in both PATA and SATA. Make sure you buy the correct one.

If I am moving gigabytes, my preference is to cable the drive to the motherboard.
a b G Storage
February 4, 2008 10:55:37 AM

He says he is going to do a new Windows install on the new drive. That is an excellent choice. Since you only have a 40 gig hard drive now, that is relatively little to move.
You will have to reinstall your programs and applications to the new drive, you cannot simply copy them. However, "data" files you have, like .doc, .xls, .qxd, .txt, .ai, and so on can simply be copied. If you play any games, you can copy your configuration files and saved game files for the game over to into the new installation. Photos, mp3's and such...just copy them as well.
February 4, 2008 4:11:40 PM

thanks for all the replies everyone, the majority of the files i am going to be transferring is mp3's/music and office documents. But I'm fairly confident I can handle what you are all suggesting.
a b G Storage
February 4, 2008 4:35:09 PM

If you put it in an external enclosure, you can always use it ongoing to backup and/or move files around.
If you want to connect it directly to the mobo for speed, then before connecting the old drive at all, you'll need to install Windows on the new drive first, as yay said, then you can do what IH8U suggests. After installing Windows on the new drive (and testing to make sure it boots properly), go into the BIOS and make sure the SATA drive is the first hard drive. Then install the old IDE drive. When you start your computer, it should boot normally, but you'll see the additional drive.
February 4, 2008 4:59:29 PM

1) Install OS on new HDD
2) Shut down...
3) Change jumpers on ‘old’ drive to slave, hook into PC.
4) Fire it up.

No need to complicate it, its just that easy.
!