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New to the P5E X38 motherboard and its BIOS settings?

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December 6, 2007 9:50:46 AM

How is everyone? Well I finely got my Asus P5E X38 mobo up and running replacing my dead Asus P5B Deluxe's BIOS death. First I can't seem to be able to change any of my Vcore settings, even for my DRAM voltage. I have no clue what my RAM voltage is right now. :(  Second thing is my temp readings in Speed Fan, Core Temp can't be correct with my IHS @ 23C with my cores @ 21C.

On top of all this even my CPU clock speed is reading wrong with my clock speed @ 2133MHz instead of 2400MHz in CPU-Z, in BIOS I have Speed Step disabled and ratio CMOS multiplier at stock of 8x266 which should = 2.4GHz. So can someone please point me in the right direction at some P5E overclocking guides and tell me how to get my temps/clock speeds where they should be for an E6600? Thank you everyone and have a great holiday!


By systemlord at 2007-12-06

December 6, 2007 10:24:40 AM

266x9 = 2.4 GHz
266x8 = 2.13 GHz

Did you install PC Probe? I have no idea on my P5K-E either unless I check it with a multimeter. I just verified it was running at BIOS settings and said that was good enough.

Temps seem off, wondering if CoreTemp Beta or SpeedFan Beta would fix that (incompatibility issues with an X38 perhaps?)

P5E Thread

Anandtech BIOS Settings Explained
December 6, 2007 6:09:50 PM

Did you know that the Intel chipset drivers that Intel is using are a modified version of the P35 chipset, in the "targeted chipset" before install shows all P35 chipsets that seem to work for this mobo. For some reason AUTO CMOS ratio control set my multiplier to 8x instead of 9x stock. Thanks for those links I'll have to check them out cause if I want to get the correct temps for my processer, which is a must.

The reason in my first post I disabled my +12 rail reading because it was reading 11.4 volts in Bios, my DVM showed +12.25 at the 24Pin mobo connector. Do you know of a way to check CPU Vcore with a DVM? The reason I ask is cause I'll NEVER trust my bios Vcore reading again, there off by 31% on my +3.3v rail and by the same on the +5 volt rail. If I can't get correct reading for those then I can't trust my readings for Vcore anymore.
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December 6, 2007 6:24:50 PM

Should be in those threads.. there is normally a resistor near the memory you can check to ground.
December 7, 2007 5:08:44 AM

cnumartyr said:
Should be in those threads.. there is normally a resistor near the memory you can check to ground.


Thanks I found the two points were to measure the CPU Vcore voltage and found out that with the new X38 chipsets you just type in the voltage you want to use. Again thanks. I have yet to get a program that will read my temps correctly.
December 7, 2007 4:11:54 PM

Try Everest Ultimate (if you don't mind spending a lil money). Mine were very accurate on Maximus Formula. (All except the CPU reading. The cores seemed correct at 61c during Prime95, but the CPU reading was sometimes hotter than the cores, which makes no sense)
December 7, 2007 7:48:34 PM

Thanatos421 said:
Try Everest Ultimate (if you don't mind spending a lil money). Mine were very accurate on Maximus Formula. (All except the CPU reading. The cores seemed correct at 61c during Prime95, but the CPU reading was sometimes hotter than the cores, which makes no sense)


Bingo thats exactly what my mobo sensors are reporting, CPU temp 24C & both cores reporting 21C. Maybe our new mobo's just released last month has something to do with the temp reading being incorrect. Hay you know what under my P5E sticker lies the letters that spell "Maximus Formula" I can clearly see the letters. So we'll have to wait for a Bios update that will fix those temp reading.

On another note I was told that if you install an OS on one mobo from an Asus P5B to an Asus P5E that I am supposed to reinstall my entire Windows XP all over again. Is this true in most cases? If so then that would be something to frown at when you mobo you bought 5 months ago dies on you forcing you to buy another mobo only to have to reinstall everything again. Is there any truth to this?
December 7, 2007 7:51:48 PM

You can get by with not doing it by disabling drivers and reinstalling the new ones.
December 7, 2007 8:11:33 PM

cnumartyr said:
You can get by with not doing it by disabling drivers and reinstalling the new ones.


Even if the drivers versions are the same ones, still reinstall all drivers? I had to do that with my Nvidia drivers because my P5E did not detect my Nvidia drivers that I installed 2 weeks ago before I got my new P5E. Also that someone that told me that I had to reinstall everything (OS) and all because he said that my older chipset drivers for the P965 chipset don't uninstall completely causing problems with the new chipset even after installing the correct chipset drivers for my new chipset X38. Is there any truth to what he is saying in you experience??? Don't worry I won't tell him if you think he is full of crap, lol.

How about installing all my games to, is this a good idea?
December 7, 2007 8:16:51 PM

The absolute safest way is a complete reinstall.

I'm lazy and normally just disable stuff and install drivers. If a driver is working ok (Video card as an example) I won't mess with it.
December 7, 2007 8:21:35 PM

cnumartyr said:
The absolute safest way is a complete reinstall.

I'm lazy and normally just disable stuff and install drivers. If a driver is working ok (Video card as an example) I won't mess with it.


Can not installing your OS on a newer mobo cause gaming performance such a ingame choppyness?
December 7, 2007 8:23:01 PM

systemlord said:
Can not installing your OS on a newer mobo cause gaming performance such a ingame choppyness?


If you are having driver errors and conflicts.
December 7, 2007 10:38:40 PM

cnumartyr said:
If you are having driver errors and conflicts.


I have never had one single error or any conflicts that I know of, now I have 14 hours running Orthos @ 3.2GHz 400FSB no errors. If there were conflicts how would I find that out? Ever since I moved from my dead mobo to this new one (Asus P5E) I have noticed better performance in load times in-between games levels, quicker more responsive in almost every way. But could I be missing out on more performace by not reinstalling XP after the mobo change? I'm not sure if my gaming performance has been effected though.
December 7, 2007 10:42:55 PM

systemlord said:
I have never had one single error or any conflicts that I know of, now I have 14 hours running Orthos @ 3.2GHz 400FSB no errors. If there were conflicts how would I find that out? Ever since I moved from my dead mobo to this new one (Asus P5E) I have noticed better performance in load times in-between games levels, quicker more responsive in almost every way. But could I be missing out on more performace by not reinstalling XP after the mobo change? I'm not sure if my gaming performance has been effected though.



I really don't think you lost any performance. The ONLY way you are going to be able to tell is Benchmark the system now, then reinstall Windows and rebenchmark.
December 8, 2007 12:38:31 AM

cnumartyr said:
I really don't think you lost any performance. The ONLY way you are going to be able to tell is Benchmark the system now, then reinstall Windows and rebenchmark.


Well heres a before reinstall of my OS with the benchmark in Crysis's built-in bench, look at the before overclock on my CPU @ stock 2.4GHz and then @ 3.2GHz overclock with my 8800GTX overclocked to Core 651/Shader 1525MHz/Memory 2000Mhz.

Look at the 12 frames per second increase going from 2.4GHz to 3.2GHz in Crysis, there was clearly a bottleneck at the processer because I ran both 2.4 to 3.2 with my 8800GTX overclocked all the time. Please any more helpful suggestions before I reformat and reinstall Windows XP? This clearly shows that Crysis is both CPU & GPU bound rather than mostly GPU bound like most have been led to believe.



By systemlord at 2007-12-07


By systemlord at 2007-12-07
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