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CBS Masters coverage

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Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:52:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Watched a few minutes (my golf limit) of the Masters on CBS this afternoon.
Seemed that they were shooting with HD cameras for some of the wide shots
but when they went to close-ups of the golfers and most other shots, it was
16:9 SD. During the time I watched, I would say less than half was HD.

You would think that for the Masters, given the higher-dollar demographic of
that viewing audience and, therefore, the probable larger percentage of HDTV
sets tuned to the broadcast, the network would go all-out to get as much of
it on the air in HD as possible.

More about : cbs masters coverage

Anonymous
April 10, 2005 4:36:38 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mack McKinnon wrote:
> Watched a few minutes (my golf limit) of the Masters on CBS this afternoon.
> Seemed that they were shooting with HD cameras for some of the wide shots
> but when they went to close-ups of the golfers and most other shots, it was
> 16:9 SD. During the time I watched, I would say less than half was HD.
>
> You would think that for the Masters, given the higher-dollar demographic of
> that viewing audience and, therefore, the probable larger percentage of HDTV
> sets tuned to the broadcast, the network would go all-out to get as much of
> it on the air in HD as possible.

The 16:9 SD shots are from the portable cameras. All of the fixed
position cameras are HD. If you want all HD, tell the golfers to stay
out of the woods and in view of the fixed cameras.

The main reason that the portable cameras are SD is the bandwidth
needed for each portable HD camera for the wireless signals and the time
it takes to do the compression. This is a problem for a golf tournament
where the cameras are scattered over a huge area. I have read that while
portable professional HD cameras are widely available, the last figure I
recall seeing was that there was a 5 second delay for the current
cameras to compress the picture, transmit it, and for the receiving hw
to process it. I would expect as newer, faster, and cheaper HD cameras
become available, the Masters will eventually go all HD. The 16:9 SD is
the compromise picked by CBS which I think most will agree is better
than pillarboxed or stretched SD pictures.

Quoting from the CBS press release lifted from the Masters thread at
avsforum.com: "For the third year, the standard analog and HDTV
productions of the 2005 Masters Tournament will be unified and will
provide 18-hole coverage in HDTV's highest definition format with 5.1
Channel Surround Sound.

In the largest HDTV golf production, CBS Sports will utilize 42 high
definition cameras and 10 hand-held 16x9 standard definition cameras.
The unified productions will be produced in HDTV's highest definition
format, 1080i, and downconverted for the CBS Television Network's analog
broadcast. This production technique also produces a better quality
analog picture. Whether watching in widescreen HD or traditional 4x3
analog, viewers will hear the same golf announcers and see the same
camera angles, replays and graphics.

The 2000 Masters was the first golf tournament ever presented live in
HDTV on network television. The 2003 Masters marked the first time that
the standard and HDTV productions of the Tournament were unified."

Alan F
April 10, 2005 5:27:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

CBS telecasts are always inferior it seems. Even on my SD TV, the clarity
was awful.

Jim

"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
message news:cVZ5e.51018$1H3.14406@tornado.texas.rr.com...
> Watched a few minutes (my golf limit) of the Masters on CBS this
> afternoon. Seemed that they were shooting with HD cameras for some of the
> wide shots but when they went to close-ups of the golfers and most other
> shots, it was 16:9 SD. During the time I watched, I would say less than
> half was HD.
>
> You would think that for the Masters, given the higher-dollar demographic
> of that viewing audience and, therefore, the probable larger percentage of
> HDTV sets tuned to the broadcast, the network would go all-out to get as
> much of it on the air in HD as possible.
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 4:43:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt (afiggatt@comcast.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> The main reason that the portable cameras are SD is the bandwidth
> needed for each portable HD camera for the wireless signals and the time
> it takes to do the compression.

I saw a guy with a portable camera snaking a wire around behind him, so they
don't seem to be completely wireless.

--
Jeff Rife |
| http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/OverTheHedge/SportOfKings....
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 7:49:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

All that from CBS sounds a lot better than it looks on the screen, IMO. The
networks seem to be able to manage NFL and college football coverage, using
a combination of fixed and mobile cameras, in almost all HD. The fairly
rare on-the-field football shot in SD really stands out. I see what you
mean about golf having people all over the place and not being very amenable
to HD technology but the result CBS is getting at this point looks pretty
poor. Given the high-dollar demographic for golf and the number of HD sets
that I would imagine are tuned to this particular event, it looks as though
they would go all out to get as much of it in HD as they possibly could. I
suppose that's what they did. But then, they can't get the news right,
either.

mack
austin


"Alan Figgatt" <afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:o NidncMWh4l-MMXfRVn-hw@comcast.com...
> Mack McKinnon wrote:
>> Watched a few minutes (my golf limit) of the Masters on CBS this
>> afternoon. Seemed that they were shooting with HD cameras for some of the
>> wide shots but when they went to close-ups of the golfers and most other
>> shots, it was 16:9 SD. During the time I watched, I would say less than
>> half was HD.
>>
>> You would think that for the Masters, given the higher-dollar demographic
>> of that viewing audience and, therefore, the probable larger percentage
>> of HDTV sets tuned to the broadcast, the network would go all-out to get
>> as much of it on the air in HD as possible.
>
> The 16:9 SD shots are from the portable cameras. All of the fixed
> position cameras are HD. If you want all HD, tell the golfers to stay out
> of the woods and in view of the fixed cameras.
>
> The main reason that the portable cameras are SD is the bandwidth needed
> for each portable HD camera for the wireless signals and the time it takes
> to do the compression. This is a problem for a golf tournament where the
> cameras are scattered over a huge area. I have read that while portable
> professional HD cameras are widely available, the last figure I recall
> seeing was that there was a 5 second delay for the current cameras to
> compress the picture, transmit it, and for the receiving hw to process it.
> I would expect as newer, faster, and cheaper HD cameras become available,
> the Masters will eventually go all HD. The 16:9 SD is the compromise
> picked by CBS which I think most will agree is better than pillarboxed or
> stretched SD pictures.
>
> Quoting from the CBS press release lifted from the Masters thread at
> avsforum.com: "For the third year, the standard analog and HDTV
> productions of the 2005 Masters Tournament will be unified and will
> provide 18-hole coverage in HDTV's highest definition format with 5.1
> Channel Surround Sound.
>
> In the largest HDTV golf production, CBS Sports will utilize 42 high
> definition cameras and 10 hand-held 16x9 standard definition cameras. The
> unified productions will be produced in HDTV's highest definition format,
> 1080i, and downconverted for the CBS Television Network's analog
> broadcast. This production technique also produces a better quality analog
> picture. Whether watching in widescreen HD or traditional 4x3 analog,
> viewers will hear the same golf announcers and see the same camera angles,
> replays and graphics.
>
> The 2000 Masters was the first golf tournament ever presented live in HDTV
> on network television. The 2003 Masters marked the first time that the
> standard and HDTV productions of the Tournament were unified."
>
> Alan F
>
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 5:39:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<<I saw a guy with a portable camera snaking a wire around behind him, so
they
don't seem to be completely wireless.>>

The remote cameras at golf tournaments are operated by two people. One is
the cameraman taking the pictures. The other is the antenna operator.
There is an antenna connected by a cable to the camera and it is his job to
point it toward a fixed receiving antenna mounted high up (usually on one of
those tall boom trucks strategically placed around the course). The
cameraman is constantly looking for his shot while the antenna man is
constantly looking for line-of-sight to the nearest receiver.

Lee


--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 4:33:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

sounds kinda old school, doesn't it? they haven't come up with a better
solution than this yet?


"Lee Gordon" <bucketofspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:i_6dnVpZW736kMffRVn-2A@comcast.com...
> <<I saw a guy with a portable camera snaking a wire around behind him, so
> they
> don't seem to be completely wireless.>>
>
> The remote cameras at golf tournaments are operated by two people. One is
> the cameraman taking the pictures. The other is the antenna operator.
> There is an antenna connected by a cable to the camera and it is his job
to
> point it toward a fixed receiving antenna mounted high up (usually on one
of
> those tall boom trucks strategically placed around the course). The
> cameraman is constantly looking for his shot while the antenna man is
> constantly looking for line-of-sight to the nearest receiver.
>
> Lee
>
>
> --
> To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"
>
>
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 11:58:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt wrote:
> Whether watching in widescreen HD or
> traditional 4x3 analog, viewers will hear the same golf announcers
> and see the same camera angles, replays and graphics.

At least CBS is giving us that.... unlike that rather sour tasting
torture we experienced this last summer known as the Summer
Olympics. Not to mention not having to see the same one Sony
ad over and over and over and over.

"Hey Bob.. whatcha doin..... watchin the game... in high def....
yeah.... can we watch with you.... i got salsa... and chip....
okay."

Bad, almost nine months later and I still can recite it. :( 

Brian The Demolition Man Little
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 1:19:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt wrote:
> Quoting from the CBS press release lifted from the Masters thread
at
> avsforum.com: "For the third year, the standard analog and HDTV
> productions of the 2005 Masters Tournament will be unified and will
> provide 18-hole coverage in HDTV's highest definition format with 5.1

> Channel Surround Sound.

This reminds of the old Bill Cosby bit he did about watching golf on
his new color TV. Paraphrasing, he said "I spent all this money to
watch a half hour of blue sky" (referring to the tee shots).
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 10:09:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote
in news:cVZ5e.51018$1H3.14406@tornado.texas.rr.com:

> Watched a few minutes (my golf limit) of the Masters on CBS this
> afternoon. Seemed that they were shooting with HD cameras for some of
> the wide shots but when they went to close-ups of the golfers and most
> other shots, it was 16:9 SD. During the time I watched, I would say
> less than half was HD.
>
> You would think that for the Masters, given the higher-dollar
> demographic of that viewing audience and, therefore, the probable
> larger percentage of HDTV sets tuned to the broadcast, the network
> would go all-out to get as much of it on the air in HD as possible.
>
>
>
>

I must say that for its shortcomings, it was the best live event I have
seen in HD, so far. Maybe it is just the sheer beauty of the course, I
don't know. The best I have seen overall, is movies in HD. It seems you
never see the pixelization, or digital blurring, that you get a lot of
times with live sports. I guess that is a factor of the on-the-fly encoding
that is done for the broadcast. The next best HD I have seen is NFL
football, especially FOX, Then ML Baseball, with NBA and NASCAR hlding up
the rear. I am on Shaw in Canada, and just get whatever they decide to pick
up so they may also be a factor in the quality. Also did you notice how the
first two rounds on USA Network for the Masters looked way worse than what
CBS put out for the weekend.

My .02 cents

Will
!