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Connecting 2.5" SATA Disk to Desktop Internal SATA

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March 5, 2008 1:17:15 AM

I need to connect a 2.5" SATA disk to a Desktop PC internally, not through USB.

Since 2.5" SATA disks require 5V unlike 3.5" SATA which need 12V, is it still alright to connect a 2.5" SATA Disk to a Desktop PC's power using a Molex to SATA power connector? This has the yellow 12V cable. Is the 2.5" SATA disk able to auto-select just 5V and not be fried by the 12V?

Thanks in advance all.

March 5, 2008 12:12:43 PM

psu does not push it's power to a component, it provides just as much as it needs. no prob
March 5, 2008 12:44:45 PM

DkN said:
psu does not push it's power to a component, it provides just as much as it needs. no prob


I think this advice is incorrect and potentially dangerous (likely only to the drive, not your house or anything). The PSU will not push down more amps than the device connected to it requires, but hooking up 12V power to something that's designed for 5V is NOT a good idea. You try plugging your 120V TV into a 220V dryer socket, and see what happens. That's why they make the plugs a different shape.

To the OP, I'd recommend talking to the manufacturer. I don't know if it will work or not, but I wouldn't try it based solely on the first response.

Clint
Related resources
March 6, 2008 12:38:29 PM

Thanks DkN & Clint.

Could you please check out the following & help me decipher if that sheds any light?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Power

I'm still in the dark after reading it together with your responses. I hope we can all benefit from this discussion & I really appreciate your time & contributions.

Thanks again.
March 6, 2008 12:39:28 PM

Thanks DkN & Clint.

Could you please check out the following & help me decipher if that sheds any light?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Power

I'm still in the dark after reading it together with your responses. I hope we can all benefit from this discussion & I really appreciate your time & contributions.

Thanks again.
a b G Storage
March 6, 2008 1:59:08 PM

The drive will use whatever power connections it requires (5V/12V/both), any unused lines will just be ignored.
March 6, 2008 3:18:26 PM

You wont have any problem at all. I did that same thing on my E6550 system to achieve a reduction in sound coming from my case and heat generation. I have a 2.5 inch 160gb SATA drive hooked and it's perfect.

On a side note, it is the most quiet computer I have ever heard...or not heard for that matter. :) 
March 7, 2008 2:03:05 PM

Thanks so much MrLinux & pbrigido.

pbrigido,

To confirm, you connected your 160GB 2.5" SATA to your Desktop PC's Molex power connector using a Molex to SATA Power adapter?

Thanks.
July 5, 2008 11:05:49 AM

DONT DO IT!

I had to send my laptop off for service so I pulled the brand new 250gb samsung sata drive and sent the laptop on it's merry way.

A few days later I desperately needed to access some info on the drive and on closer inspection I couldn't help notice that the 2.5" sata hd connectors are the same as a 3.5" model.

Now industry standards being relatively reliable with something like sata leads me to think that of course it'll be safe. The 12volt line can't possibly be connected in the drive right. Then I browsed some forums just to double check and like this thread, the overall vibe was no probs. So I went ahead and (very stupidly) connected both the 250gb samsung drive, and the original 60gb drive figuring why should 60gb lay waste when it fits in my gaming pc.

Nada, nothing... no sign of the drives in my desktop pc bios. I have a Seasonic M12 psu, I happened to have a molex to two sata adapter cable on hand so rather than fumble about in the back of the loft looking for the official M12 modular psu sata power lead, I just connected this molex to sata adapter.

Yeah so no life from the drives. I figured ah well, mustnt work.

Anyway, my laptop returned from service yesterday. I reconnected the 250gb drive and what do you know.... DEAD AS A DODO!!! then I tried the 60gb in the laptop, also dead! and I'm talking no spinup, nothing.... dead.

So guys i advise against this.. Use a usb external enclosure adapter or at least an internal 3.5" to 2.5" bracket with a power line adapter that only supplies 5v to the drive, if such a thing exists.

July 12, 2008 9:28:57 PM

Might be a workaround for the power issue...buy a 5V voltage regulator and run your power through it. All a voltage regulator does is dissipate the extra voltage, and you should have a stable 5V. You just have to make sure that you buy a +5 Volt regultor (negative voltage models are available, you don't want these), and that its rated for higher than the 3-4 watts your drive will probably consume. You should be able to buy one at a radio shack or something like that. Here's one:

http://www.radioshack.com/pwr/product-reviews/Cables-Parts-Connectors/Component-parts/Transistors-analog-ICs/RadioShack/p/2062599-5V-Fixed-Voltage-Regulator-7805.html

Ok...to connect it...the picture they have there is upside down, the pins should be pointing down, and that orientation is where I give the directions here from. All you really need to do is connect the input pin (left side of the regulator looking at the front) to your 12V power, your output pin (right side of regulator) supplies the 5V power to your drive, and connect the center lead to your negative/ground wire. You'll probably need to splice it directly into the wires...so only do it if you're really sure you want to use this drive for a while.

If you want to have a little more fun with it, How Stuff Works has a guide for it at the following URL...ignore the references to a transformer and all, you just want the filter info...and you honestly don't need the capacitors, since the incoming power is already filtered...it goes so far as to show you how to add an LED into the circuit too, so you'll know if you did it right and have power:

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/digital-electronics4.htm
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 11, 2008 12:45:42 AM

simple answer get a molex to SATA adapter and simply remove the yellow wire. its works, im usin it now.
a b G Storage
November 11, 2008 3:06:54 AM

No need to change anything. Plug it in. It will work fine. The sata power cable provides +12V, +5V, and ground to the drive. The notebook drive uses only the +5v and ground, and the 12v won't matter. Desktop drives use both the +12 and the +5 (as well as the ground). You won't fry a thing.
a b G Storage
December 13, 2008 1:46:57 PM

Lots of good advice above: we needed to format 4 x Toshiba 2.5"
laptop hard drives recently, and we connected the HDD SATA port
to the eSATA port on the rear panel of our ASUS P5W64 WS Pro.

The power input came from an Antec AT-style psu with separate
ON/OFF switch, and a Molex-to-SATA adapter cable.

Everything worked perfectly the first time with all 4 HDDs.

I hope this helps.


MRFS
Anonymous
a b G Storage
February 14, 2010 12:57:00 PM

In my case I had to remove the yellow wire from the molex-to-sata adapter in order to be able to low level format the hard drive using my desktop. With the yellow wire connected, the drive was listed inside the BIOS but the OS wouldn't boot / seagate disk wizard boot iso didn't find it.

Seagate Momentus 5400.2
60 GB
Model ST96812AS
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 23, 2010 1:53:44 PM

you all keep talking about using adapters for the molex connectors but what about hdd that have the sata power connector, will it work a straight connection with sata connector since it sends 3.3, 5, or 12 volts??
May 20, 2010 6:23:03 PM

I hope so coz im dooing it in a custom build of mine very soon..
a b G Storage
May 21, 2010 5:05:30 AM

Quote:
you all keep talking about using adapters for the molex connectors but what about hdd that have the sata power connector, will it work a straight connection with sata connector since it sends 3.3, 5, or 12 volts??

Yes, SATA connectors are universal. A notebook SATA drive will work just fine in a desktop (and as a matter of fact, I have two notebook SATA drives connected to my desktop right now as I'm typing this).
June 17, 2010 9:36:16 PM

Very useful info, some one should sticky this for those who are like my self are looking to use 2.5in drives just data storage while keeping heat and power to a minimum.
a c 351 G Storage
June 18, 2010 6:17:10 PM

Above, that indicated no problem are right = A+. Look at all the 2 1/2 in sata SSDs that are installed in desktops with no problem. For power they are configured identical to HDDs and as seveal have pointed out the Pin that has the +12 (from desktops) is simply not connected internally in the 2 1/2" drives.

For anonymous - the 3.3 only goes to the MB, not to Molex or SATA power connector.
July 30, 2010 5:51:55 PM

Can I request re-opening of this issue with a query.

I have a 2.5" SATA hard drive from my now dead laptop. This drive has a fully functioning set of Win7 OS files.

Will I be able to boot off this drive in a brand new desktop build I am putting together?
a c 351 G Storage
July 31, 2010 3:09:46 AM

Realy should open your own thread

Most likely - No.
Laptop Operating systems are OEM copies an tied to the laptop. It will kind of Barf when you try to boot on a new machine - most of the Drivers (Chipset, sound, ect) will be incorrect. Should you somehow get it to boot, when it checks itself, it will find that it no longer is on the correct computer and politly let you know that it is not good to fool mother nature.
August 1, 2010 10:32:42 AM

From the WIKI:


Cables, connectors, and ports

Connectors and cables present the most visible differences between SATA and parallel ATA drives. Unlike PATA, the same connectors are used on 3.5-inch SATA hard disks for desktop and server computers and 2.5-inch disks for portable or small computers; this allows 2.5-inch drives to be used in desktop computers with only a mounting bracket and no wiring adapter. Smaller disks may use the mini-SATA spec, suitable for small-form-factor Serial ATA drives and mini SSDs.[20]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_ATA#Power
Anonymous
a b G Storage
August 31, 2010 2:13:26 PM

I am a certified electronics technician:

Voltage goes up, current goes down
current goes up, voltage goes down

When you observe a power supply it has 2 ratings, in most cases.

1) Voltage
2) Amperage

This means that the power device is designed to send exactly that! Nothing more, nothing less!

Remember that any device that requires a power supply in order to operate, does not have an internal power supply. This means their is no circuitry that comes with a power supply in such device. For example, a bridge circuit (Converts AC to DC), a regulatory circuit (The section that adjusts or fine tunes the DC output) and there is more... but enough said.

What this means is that what you apply is what it tries to use, and cannot self adjust for any changes. And if you apply the wrong thing.... well...

More over, This is why small devices need a power supply, because without it, one can't manufacture something as small as it is.

Lets make a chart:

Device Expecting _____ Power Supply Out (+VCC) _____ Actual Results
--------------------- _____ -------------------------------- _____ --------------------------
12V & 500 Milli Amps _____ 12V & 500 Milli Amps _____ 12V & 500 Milli Amps
12V $ 500 Milli Amps _____ 5V & 500 Milli Amps _____ 5V & 1.2 Amps
|
+--- This one fries the circuits and psychically burns the lines/wires with way too much current and can actually start a house fire. When the device stops working you smell the burn.

5V & .75 Amps _____ 5V & .75 Amps _____ 5V & .75 Amps
5V & .75 Amps _____ 12V & .5 Amps _____ 12V & .1 Amps
+
+--- This case is not a fire hazard and is the silent killer. The device cannot take the pressure of doubling the voltage without a regulator and physically ionizes the parts, resistors, capacitors. When the device stops working you usually smell nothing.


The clock radio you plug into the wall next to your bed? Do you think it is actually using 120V AC Power? Of course not!

The clock has its own power supply built in, and it also uses 5 or 12 volts DC. If the voltage during the day changes from 110V up to 122V and down to 108V the DC output on the power supply does not change and stays at 5V/12V DC because of the regulatory circuit.

A small external power supply does not work like the bigger internal power supplies. They do have a regulatory circuit just the TV or Radio and produce the same 5V or 12V DC not matter what happens to the AC power in. Not only does it maintain the same Voltage, but it maintains the same Amperage. So think about that next time you say, "HEY I THINK THIS IS THE POWER SUPPLY LET'S PLUG IT IN AND SEE IF IT WORKS?" BAD IDEA!

Always check the ratings on the device, and on the power supply, if they don't match, DON'T PLUG THEM IN! OR ELSE! GUARANTEED!
a c 351 G Storage
August 31, 2010 3:27:22 PM

This is a very old thread, normally not posted to - as the OP has probably forgot about and has resolved his issue.

I'm only providing an input to clarify INCase someone hapens to read.

"Voltage goes up, current goes down"
This is only true if the Power used by the circuitry has a constant power consumption (P=IE). P=constant, then If E increases 10% then I would decrease 10% (real life if E (the change) increases 10 % then I would only decrease (bailpark) say 8%
In a resistive cuircit, Current would Go UP, not Down ( I = E/R)

"current goes up, voltage goes down"
Only in a unregulated PSU (excluding the Effiency of regulation)
External to the PSU. If current has increased then the load Resistance (Impeadance) must have decreased. That component, If in series with a second component will have a lower Voltage drop, BUT the other component in series will show an INCREASED voltage drop. This is true upto the point of exceeding the Current rating of the PSU.

"When you observe a power supply it has 2 ratings, in most cases.
1) Voltage 2) Amperage
This means that the power device is designed to send exactly that! Nothing more, nothing less"

If you are refering to a PSU As a "load" does not "send" it consumes power. And it can be variable, as an example a GPU in 2 D mode switching to 3D mode.
For PSUs, The voltage is the regulated voltage between the designed min/max current Ratings (Most PSUs do not list min, But with the exception of Shunt regulated PSUs there is a min current level. Example: For series regulated, the output would increase to the Max rectified Voltage which is always higher than the regulated Voltage. Old switching PSU would normally self destruct with no load - Newer designs incorporate a internal resistance so that the "Min" load is placed on the output. Shunt regulated can regulate the output even with no load, but have a problem with high loads. This occures when the ouput load current increases the IR drop accross the internal series resitor to the point that the output voltage is less than the shunt regulators voltage rating (ie for a 12 Volt zenor to regulate the voltage cannot drop below 12 V accross it, For the "OLD" VR tumes this was the deionizing voltage.
So Amperage is ONLY the max rated value - the Amperage drawin will always be equal to, and in vast majority of cases will be less.

I'm also a certified ET, My number was 76 (76th person in the state (ILL) to pass the test).
March 28, 2011 6:04:24 PM

brendanchann said:
I need to connect a 2.5" SATA disk to a Desktop PC internally, not through USB.

Since 2.5" SATA disks require 5V unlike 3.5" SATA which need 12V, is it still alright to connect a 2.5" SATA Disk to a Desktop PC's power using a Molex to SATA power connector? This has the yellow 12V cable. Is the 2.5" SATA disk able to auto-select just 5V and not be fried by the 12V?

Thanks in advance all.




Using a notebook IDE drive to convert to sata or an sata to ide.. DOES NOT MATTER! Eletronics do a simple thing called leech prossessssss :)  they take what they need.... nothing more! DO NOT PUT AC vs DC Big diff from 120v 240v amps are the cause besides watts not volts :)  all computers are DC! not AC! this is old post but to many ppl talking like they know. almost every post on here is WRONG! using an sata or IDE drive from a notebook into a tower is NO PROB!!!! if u cant find the drive your bios is not correctly set or u have a i386 on the notebook drive u need to right click my computer and manage - disc drives. then right click your drive u want formated and delete partition then make new drive :)  good day. 16 years gaming = 15 years TECH :p 
April 3, 2011 10:40:04 AM

I would like to say that i use USB to Sata/IDE/floppy connector kit with external psu from VANTEC on the Egg on a nearly weekly basis shuffeling around 2-3 drives(not good for pins i know). To remedy this issue for using the molex to sata adapters, I simply aquired a second molex to sata and removed the yellow 12v wire. I use these two cables based on the HDD being worked on. In ~ 9 month's ive only had one issue with this method.

(issue) The third (<counting 1 Black 2 red 3 black 4 <non present yellow> counting straight across) wire which is a second ground came loose on the molex end and was not making contact and oddly fried my small laptop drive. The issue was figured out quickly on inspection of the wiring. That mistake has been further prevented by packing a minimal amount of Hot Glue into the pin slot with a small tipped Glue Gun. Since this improvement has been made I have yet to encounter any other issues.

The Cable that I modified with the removal of the 12v(yellow) wire is the Aprevia brand (was on sale for 1.99 with free shipping at the time

Aprevia Modified Cable on "The EGG" is ITEM NUMBER - N82E16812201002
The Vantec model on "the EGG" that I have been using is ITEM NUMBER - N82E16812232002

October 15, 2011 6:13:36 PM

CNeufeld said:
I think this advice is incorrect and potentially dangerous (likely only to the drive, not your house or anything). The PSU will not push down more amps than the device connected to it requires, but hooking up 12V power to something that's designed for 5V is NOT a good idea. You try plugging your 120V TV into a 220V dryer socket, and see what happens. That's why they make the plugs a different shape.

To the OP, I'd recommend talking to the manufacturer. I don't know if it will work or not, but I wouldn't try it based solely on the first response.

Clint


In simple terms, current is always as per equipment requirement (however there is a limit), it will draw or consume current (mA). but Voltage (potential difference or Volts) is supplied to the equipment as per it's requirement or design, Therefore you can not give 12V to an equipment that is design to work with 5V, it will burn or will damage immediately 100%, if you go still deeper it's a simple formula V=IxR, where all three are flexible, but this does not work on electronics or microchip based circuits. One more important point is that for 5V you can supply 6 or 7 Volts and it may deal with it, but 12 is little higher and dangerous for HDD, The exception to this is some special equipment designed to run on multiple voltages and adjust automatically like - Power adapter for Mac Mini - it excepts 110 to 250 Volts and still maintains the output constant.
October 21, 2011 8:17:15 AM

How to Install Laptop Hard Drive to Desktop Computer

There are two possible procedures to connect your laptop hard drive to your desktop computer. The first procedure may be done by connecting the laptop hard drive internally via a 2.5” to 3.5” Integrated Drive Electronics “IDE” Interface or Serial Attachment “SATA” interface adapter converter. The second way is by externally connecting your hard drive by the use of IDE or SATA interface enclosure via Universal Serial Bus “USB” cable.

Materials Needed:
- Laptop and Desktop computer
- IDE/SATA hard drive enclosure
- 2.5” to 3.5” IDE/SATA hard disk adapter converter
- USB cable
- IDE cable
- screw driver.

Step 1

Turn off your laptop and remove the battery of the laptop then unscrew the cover where the hard drive is located. Remove the hard drive from your laptop.

Step 2

Check the laptop hard drive if the interface is 'IDE' or 'SATA' interface. If you are using the IDE or SATA interface enclosure via Universal Serial Bus cable, follow Steps 3 to step 4. Follow steps 8 to step 7 if you are using 2.5' to 3.5 IDE/SATA interface adapter converter.

Step 3

Open the cover of the IDE/SATA Enclosure and connect the laptop hard drive to the enclosure adapter. Put the laptop hard drive in the IDE/SATA enclosure. Firmly connect the enclosure adapter to the hard drive. Close the cover of the IDE/SATA enclosure and secure it with screws for safety. Connect the USB cable in the enclosure.

Step 4

The Enclosure is a plug-and-play device. Now, you may connect it to the USB port on the desktop computer and other laptops. Turn off the desktop computer before opening the CPU cover.

Step 5

Attach the 2.5' to 3.5' IDE/SATA hard disk adapter converter to the laptop hard drive. Make sure that the connected laptop hard disk to the converter adapter is firmly connected. Connect the 4-pin peripheral power connector, usually called 'Moldex' connector to the 2.5' to 3.5' IDE/SATA hard disk adapter converter.

Step 6

Connect the IDE/SATA adapter cable to the motherboard’s IDE connector or SATA connector. Place the laptop hard disk with adapter converter inside the desktop computer and screw it tightly.

Step 7

Connect the power cable to the desktop computer. Check the laptop hard drive using basic input /output system 'BIOS'. The BIOS function is to detect, test, and initialize system device like hard drive, floppy drive, and integrated video/sound/network interface card. Now, you can access your files or data in your laptop drive in your desktop computer.

source : http://www.liutilities.com/how-to/install-laptop-hard-d...
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