beyond Blu-Ray, HD-DVD: InPhase Holographic Disc Storage S..

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

200 GigaByte and 300 GigaByte Storage -
on a disc / system called WORM (Write Once, Read Many)


"InPhase Technologies will be showing off a holographic video recorder
next week with a new type of 3D storage that can hold 20 movies on a
single disc"


"Holographic media will get an airing next week in Las Vegas, as
InPhase Technologies promises a demonstration of its first prototype
system.

In addition, InPhase firmed up its product plans, too - the first
InPhase drives will ship to commercial customers in 2006, at a larger
300 GByte capacity point."


http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:XPmgX2waHEoJ:news.zdnet.co.uk/hardware/0,39020351,2107853,00.htm+inphase+%22Constellation+3D%22&hl=en
http://www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20050413_201751.html
http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1558,1785630,00.asp
http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20050412005244&newsLang=en
http://www.networkmagazineindia.com/200503/newsanalysis08.shtml
http://www.networkmagazineindia.com/200503/20050307.jpg
http://press.xtvworld.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4937
http://www.itpronto.com/content/112/523.html
http://www.hardwarezone.com/news/view.php?id=1143&cid=4


300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD

and still a ~6x leap beyond 50 GB Blu-Ray (2x)

*20Mb transfer rate on the 200GB model, (a little slow, no?)


The only thing that might be able to compete with InPhase's Holographic
Disc storage system is the FMD / FMD-ROM (Fluorescent Multilayer Disk)
by Constellation 3D which can hold something like 140 GB in its first
generation, and TeraByte+ capacity in its second generation.
(correct me if I'm wrong on that)

Constellation 3D's FMD / FMD-ROM was announced about 5 years ago.


btw, InPhase is aiming for 1.6TB of space, so it seems both InPhase
and Constellation 3D have similar storage-space goals.

I wonder when computers, consumer electronics, playstations, etc will
be able to have this technology (Holographic or Fluorescent disks) at
affordable mass-market prices ?
12 answers Last reply
More about beyond inphase holographic disc storage
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    I also forgot to mention in my post that, there is also HVD
    ~ Holographic Versatile Disc by Japan's Optware Corp. and Fuji Film

    which will store between 1 TB and 3.9 TeraBytes of data


    http://groups-beta.google.com/group/alt.video.dvd/msg/195fb61ff72c3407?dmode=source

    http://www.thechannelinsider.com/article2/0,1759,1760259,00.asp

    ________________________________________________________
    http://www.cameratown.com/news/news.cfm/hurl/id%7C1182

    FujiFilm To Display Holographic Storage Technology at NAB

    Holographic Storage Offers Several Terabytes of Removable, Backward
    Compatible DVD-size Disc Storage For Film & Electronic Media
    Applications

    Valhalla, New York, April 13, 2005 Next week at the National
    Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Show in Las Vegas, Fuji Photo Film
    U.S.A., Inc. will display its next generation information storage disc
    technology that promises over 200 times greater capacity (or up to 3.9
    TB) and 40 times the transfer speed of today's DVD media. Called
    Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD), the technology utilizes existing
    manufacturing processes and a unique application of servo information
    to markedly increase the storage capacity beyond that of today's
    optical discs.

    This technology is the result of innovation from Optware Corporation,
    now supported by the recently formed Holographic Versatile Disc (HVD)
    Alliance, an industry consortium of global technology companies
    announced in January.
    ________________________________________________________


    It would be interesting to learn the pros and cons of these 3 next-next
    gen optical storage technologies:

    *FMD ~ Fluorescent Multilayer Disc by Constellation 3D
    *HVD ~ Holographic Versatile Disc by Optware / Fuji Film
    *Holographic Storage by InPhase
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Radeon350@yahoo.com wrote:

    > 200 GigaByte and 300 GigaByte Storage -
    > on a disc / system called WORM (Write Once, Read Many)
    >
    >
    >
    > "InPhase Technologies will be showing off a holographic video recorder
    > next week with a new type of 3D storage that can hold 20 movies on a
    > single disc"
    >
    >
    > "Holographic media will get an airing next week in Las Vegas, as
    > InPhase Technologies promises a demonstration of its first prototype
    > system.
    >
    > In addition, InPhase firmed up its product plans, too - the first
    > InPhase drives will ship to commercial customers in 2006, at a larger
    > 300 GByte capacity point."
    >
    >
    >
    >
    http://64.233.167.104/search?q=cache:XPmgX2waHEoJ:news.zdnet.co.uk/hardware/0,39020351,2107853,00.htm+inphase+%22Constellation+3D%22&hl=en
    > http://www.tomshardware.com/hardnews/20050413_201751.html
    > http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1558,1785630,00.asp
    >
    http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20050412005244&newsLang=en
    > http://www.networkmagazineindia.com/200503/newsanalysis08.shtml
    > http://www.networkmagazineindia.com/200503/20050307.jpg
    > http://press.xtvworld.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=4937
    > http://www.itpronto.com/content/112/523.html
    > http://www.hardwarezone.com/news/view.php?id=1143&cid=4
    >
    >
    > 300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD
    >
    > and still a ~6x leap beyond 50 GB Blu-Ray (2x)
    >
    > *20Mb transfer rate on the 200GB model, (a little slow, no?)
    >
    >
    > The only thing that might be able to compete with InPhase's Holographic
    > Disc storage system is the FMD / FMD-ROM (Fluorescent Multilayer Disk)
    > by Constellation 3D which can hold something like 140 GB in its first
    > generation, and TeraByte+ capacity in its second generation.
    > (correct me if I'm wrong on that)
    >
    > Constellation 3D's FMD / FMD-ROM was announced about 5 years ago.
    >
    >
    >
    > btw, InPhase is aiming for 1.6TB of space, so it seems both InPhase
    > and Constellation 3D have similar storage-space goals.
    >
    > I wonder when computers, consumer electronics, playstations, etc will
    > be able to have this technology (Holographic or Fluorescent disks) at
    > affordable mass-market prices ?

    If the market functions true to form then computers will be able to have
    this technology at affordable mass-market prices right about the time that
    hard disks with significantly greater capacity become cheaper than the new
    technology.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > Radeon350@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I wonder when computers, consumer electronics, playstations, etc will
    >>be able to have this technology (Holographic or Fluorescent disks) at
    >>affordable mass-market prices ?
    >
    >
    > If the market functions true to form then computers will be able to have
    > this technology at affordable mass-market prices right about the time that
    > hard disks with significantly greater capacity become cheaper than the new
    > technology.
    >

    Do a google search for "perpendicular magnetic storage" to verify your
    prediction. Hitachi is talking terabytes for laptops.

    --
    Matthew

    I'm a contractor. If you want an opinion, I'll sell you one.
    Which one do you want?
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    <Radeon350@yahoo.com> wrote in message

    > I wonder when computers, consumer electronics, playstations, etc will
    > be able to have this technology (Holographic or Fluorescent disks) at
    > affordable mass-market prices ?

    As important as videogames have become financially, and with the market's
    ability to change formats without alienating customers (hard to do with
    movies), it might work the other way around: their incorporation in
    videogame consoles might be what brings their prices down to mass-market
    levels.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >
    >300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD

    Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    --
    Paul 'US Sitcom Fan' Hyett
  6. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Paul Hyett wrote:

    > In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >>
    >>300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD
    >
    > Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    > when 100Mb HD's came out... :)

    High definition television.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  7. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Paul Hyett wrote:
    > In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    > >
    > >300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or
    HD-DVD
    >
    > Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    > when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    > --
    > Paul 'US Sitcom Fan' Hyett


    heh, 300 GB is nothing compared to what else is on the horizon. The
    other holographic technology, the one proposed by an alliance of
    Japanese companies lead by Fuji Film and Optware, HVD ~ Holographic
    Versatile Disc, will reportedly start off at about 1 TeraByte or so,
    and go upto 3.9 TeraBytes.

    The InPhase technology ranges from 200 GB to 1.6 TeraBytes by
    comparison.


    If that weren't enough, Michael Thomas of the company called Colossal
    Storage, who says that HVD might have a fatal flaw, is working on
    something called (get ready to swallow this one) "Colossal Atomic
    Holographic DVR disc drives"

    "each one of which would be equal to a 10,000 to 100,000 Gigabyte Disk
    Drive"

    and I think that's the same as 10 to 100 TeraBytes


    here's the 2 articles I've seen on this bad mofo
    http://p2pnet.net/story/3855
    http://p2pnet.net/story/842


    the main features of this "ultimate" storage technology

    "Advantage of Rewritable Atomic Holographic Optical Disk Drive Storage
    Colossal Storage wants its 3D Volume Holographic Optical Storage to be
    an " ALL IN ONE " Storage Solution replacing Ram, Rom, DRAM, Ovonic,
    Flash, 2D Optical Drives, Tape Drives, and Hard Drives for " ALL IN ONE
    " complete system hardware storage requirements."

    * New novel storage media - Ferroelectric Molecular Holographic
    Optical
    * New novel integrated semiconductor FE Read/Write Head
    * New novel recording using UV/Blue Laser Diode and electric field
    transducer
    * Potential bit density far exceeding present/future drive
    technology
    * Extremely Fast Switch Sub nanosecond State Change
    * Extremely High Read and Write Data Transfer Rates
    * Extended Temperature Range
    * No Altitude Requirements
    * Dense Packed Crystallis with densities >200 Tbits/sq.in.
    * 8 cents per Gigabyte versus Hard Drives cost of $ 1.00 cents
    Gigabyte
    * 1 10 Terabyte Removable Rewritable Fedisk will be $ 45
    * 1 10 Terabyte Fedisk = 20,000 DVD's or 4,000 Blu-Ray
    * Download 6,840 raw uncompressed TV Hours
    * Initial cost per gigabyte be greater than hard drives to
    recapture R&D expenses
    * No Power Requirements for Media - Non Volatile Media
    * Much higher sales margins for media, heads, and drive than data
    storage
  8. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Radeon350@yahoo.com wrote:

    >
    > Paul Hyett wrote:
    >> In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >> >
    >> >300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or
    > HD-DVD
    >>
    >> Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    >> when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    >> --
    >> Paul 'US Sitcom Fan' Hyett
    >
    >
    > heh, 300 GB is nothing compared to what else is on the horizon. The
    > other holographic technology, the one proposed by an alliance of
    > Japanese companies lead by Fuji Film and Optware, HVD ~ Holographic
    > Versatile Disc, will reportedly start off at about 1 TeraByte or so,
    > and go upto 3.9 TeraBytes.

    Reported by _who_? The standards they've submitted to the ISO are for 30,
    100, and 200 GB disks, with approval expected in late 2006 or early 2007.

    > The InPhase technology ranges from 200 GB to 1.6 TeraBytes by
    > comparison.

    In other words about the same.

    > If that weren't enough, Michael Thomas of the company called Colossal
    > Storage, who says that HVD might have a fatal flaw, is working on
    > something called (get ready to swallow this one) "Colossal Atomic
    > Holographic DVR disc drives"
    >
    > "each one of which would be equal to a 10,000 to 100,000 Gigabyte Disk
    > Drive"
    >
    > and I think that's the same as 10 to 100 TeraBytes

    Has this company ever produced a product?

    It's easy to say that you're going to use bafflegabbed trekulators to
    achieve forty exabytes. It's a lot harder to actually do it.

    > here's the 2 articles I've seen on this bad mofo
    > http://p2pnet.net/story/3855
    > http://p2pnet.net/story/842
    >
    >
    > the main features of this "ultimate" storage technology
    >
    > "Advantage of Rewritable Atomic Holographic Optical Disk Drive Storage
    > Colossal Storage wants its 3D Volume Holographic Optical Storage to be
    > an " ALL IN ONE " Storage Solution replacing Ram, Rom, DRAM, Ovonic,
    > Flash, 2D Optical Drives, Tape Drives, and Hard Drives for " ALL IN ONE
    > " complete system hardware storage requirements."
    >
    > * New novel storage media - Ferroelectric Molecular Holographic
    > Optical
    > * New novel integrated semiconductor FE Read/Write Head
    > * New novel recording using UV/Blue Laser Diode and electric field
    > transducer
    > * Potential bit density far exceeding present/future drive
    > technology
    > * Extremely Fast Switch Sub nanosecond State Change
    > * Extremely High Read and Write Data Transfer Rates
    > * Extended Temperature Range
    > * No Altitude Requirements
    > * Dense Packed Crystallis with densities >200 Tbits/sq.in.
    > * 8 cents per Gigabyte versus Hard Drives cost of $ 1.00 cents
    > Gigabyte
    > * 1 10 Terabyte Removable Rewritable Fedisk will be $ 45
    > * 1 10 Terabyte Fedisk = 20,000 DVD's or 4,000 Blu-Ray
    > * Download 6,840 raw uncompressed TV Hours
    > * Initial cost per gigabyte be greater than hard drives to
    > recapture R&D expenses
    > * No Power Requirements for Media - Non Volatile Media
    > * Much higher sales margins for media, heads, and drive than data
    > storage

    Looks to me like a typical snake oil pitch.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  9. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Paul Hyett <pah@nojunkmailplease.co.uk> wrote in
    news:IfKYRDEbJ2XCFwKc@activist.demon.co.uk:

    > In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >>
    >>300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD
    >
    > Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    > when 100Mb HD's came out... :)

    Wasn't it Bill Gates who said, in the early days of PC's that 640K ought to
    be enough memory for anyone? I have 2 gigabytes of fast RAM in this box
    and it's just enough for present needs and probably not for future! My
    first disc drive was a 5.25 inch floppy drive by Micropolis with a
    controller for the S100 Bus and an OS. That cost more in those-days'
    dollars than my 120gb and WinXP cost in today's bucks. Yet we complain!

    --
    Dave Oldridge+
    ICQ 1800667

    A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv,rec.video.dvd.tech,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage,alt.games.video.sony-playstation2,comp.arch.storage (More info?)

    Dave Oldridge wrote:

    > Paul Hyett <pah@nojunkmailplease.co.uk> wrote in
    > news:IfKYRDEbJ2XCFwKc@activist.demon.co.uk:
    >
    >> In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >>>
    >>>300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or HD-DVD
    >>
    >> Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    >> when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    >
    > Wasn't it Bill Gates who said, in the early days of PC's that 640K ought
    > to
    > be enough memory for anyone?

    That's an urban legend. Gates denies it and nobody has ever been able to
    produce the source. The "640k barrier" was established by the location of
    the video memory in the PC, which was an IBM design decision--MS/PC-DOS
    allowed a good deal more than that if the video memory was relocated.

    > I have 2 gigabytes of fast RAM in this box
    > and it's just enough for present needs and probably not for future! My
    > first disc drive was a 5.25 inch floppy drive by Micropolis with a
    > controller for the S100 Bus and an OS. That cost more in those-days'
    > dollars than my 120gb and WinXP cost in today's bucks. Yet we complain!
    >

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
  11. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in
    news:d3ojb00gvn@news2.newsguy.com:

    > Dave Oldridge wrote:
    >
    >> Paul Hyett <pah@nojunkmailplease.co.uk> wrote in
    >> news:IfKYRDEbJ2XCFwKc@activist.demon.co.uk:
    >>
    >>> In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    >>>>
    >>>>300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or
    >>>>HD-DVD
    >>>
    >>> Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the
    >>> same when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    >>
    >> Wasn't it Bill Gates who said, in the early days of PC's that 640K
    >> ought to
    >> be enough memory for anyone?
    >
    > That's an urban legend. Gates denies it and nobody has ever been able
    > to produce the source. The "640k barrier" was established by the
    > location of the video memory in the PC, which was an IBM design
    > decision--MS/PC-DOS allowed a good deal more than that if the video
    > memory was relocated.

    There's certainly enough such legends. But I do remember people saying
    this as if it were gospel right around that time (which was about the
    time I was installing a 386 in my box and 2Mb of RAM to go with).


    --
    Dave Oldridge+
    ICQ 1800667

    A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Whatever happened to Keele High Density (NMR based)?

    "J. Clarke" <jclarke.usenet@snet.net.invalid> wrote in message
    news:d3otsd110iu@news2.newsguy.com...
    > Radeon350@yahoo.com wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Paul Hyett wrote:
    > >> In rec.video.dvd.tech on Thu, 14 Apr 2005, wrote :
    > >> >
    > >> >300 GB, that is a roughly ~10 fold leap beyond Blu-Ray (1x) or
    > > HD-DVD
    > >>
    > >> Who on earth would want that much memory... mind you, I said the same
    > >> when 100Mb HD's came out... :)
    > >> --
    > >> Paul 'US Sitcom Fan' Hyett
    > >
    > >
    > > heh, 300 GB is nothing compared to what else is on the horizon. The
    > > other holographic technology, the one proposed by an alliance of
    > > Japanese companies lead by Fuji Film and Optware, HVD ~ Holographic
    > > Versatile Disc, will reportedly start off at about 1 TeraByte or so,
    > > and go upto 3.9 TeraBytes.
    >
    > Reported by _who_? The standards they've submitted to the ISO are for 30,
    > 100, and 200 GB disks, with approval expected in late 2006 or early 2007.
    >
    > > The InPhase technology ranges from 200 GB to 1.6 TeraBytes by
    > > comparison.
    >
    > In other words about the same.
    >
    > > If that weren't enough, Michael Thomas of the company called Colossal
    > > Storage, who says that HVD might have a fatal flaw, is working on
    > > something called (get ready to swallow this one) "Colossal Atomic
    > > Holographic DVR disc drives"
    > >
    > > "each one of which would be equal to a 10,000 to 100,000 Gigabyte Disk
    > > Drive"
    > >
    > > and I think that's the same as 10 to 100 TeraBytes
    >
    > Has this company ever produced a product?
    >
    > It's easy to say that you're going to use bafflegabbed trekulators to
    > achieve forty exabytes. It's a lot harder to actually do it.
    >
    > > here's the 2 articles I've seen on this bad mofo
    > > http://p2pnet.net/story/3855
    > > http://p2pnet.net/story/842
    > >
    > >
    > > the main features of this "ultimate" storage technology
    > >
    > > "Advantage of Rewritable Atomic Holographic Optical Disk Drive Storage
    > > Colossal Storage wants its 3D Volume Holographic Optical Storage to be
    > > an " ALL IN ONE " Storage Solution replacing Ram, Rom, DRAM, Ovonic,
    > > Flash, 2D Optical Drives, Tape Drives, and Hard Drives for " ALL IN ONE
    > > " complete system hardware storage requirements."
    > >
    > > * New novel storage media - Ferroelectric Molecular Holographic
    > > Optical
    > > * New novel integrated semiconductor FE Read/Write Head
    > > * New novel recording using UV/Blue Laser Diode and electric field
    > > transducer
    > > * Potential bit density far exceeding present/future drive
    > > technology
    > > * Extremely Fast Switch Sub nanosecond State Change
    > > * Extremely High Read and Write Data Transfer Rates
    > > * Extended Temperature Range
    > > * No Altitude Requirements
    > > * Dense Packed Crystallis with densities >200 Tbits/sq.in.
    > > * 8 cents per Gigabyte versus Hard Drives cost of $ 1.00 cents
    > > Gigabyte
    > > * 1 10 Terabyte Removable Rewritable Fedisk will be $ 45
    > > * 1 10 Terabyte Fedisk = 20,000 DVD's or 4,000 Blu-Ray
    > > * Download 6,840 raw uncompressed TV Hours
    > > * Initial cost per gigabyte be greater than hard drives to
    > > recapture R&D expenses
    > > * No Power Requirements for Media - Non Volatile Media
    > > * Much higher sales margins for media, heads, and drive than data
    > > storage
    >
    > Looks to me like a typical snake oil pitch.
    >
    > --
    > --John
    > to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    > (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
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