Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

mobos keep dying

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
December 29, 2007 3:47:37 AM

It seems like every time i try to liquid-cool a mobo or modify a liquid cooling system on a mobo, my computer dies. This is the third time I've finished working on a system, only to push the power button and have nothing happen.

I've already tested the power supply, which works fine if the mobo is not connected, and I've tried plugging a different PSU into the mobo. I've even tried shorting the power-on "jumper" with a piece of metal, in case the switch was damaged. No go.

This keeps happening to me, and I was wondering if there's some sort of rookie mistake that could cause this. Also, what could cause a mobo to not power on, and how can that be fixed?

Current setup:
proc - Intel Q6600
ram - GSKill DDR2 800
mobo - GA-P35-DS3L rev 2.0

Cooled components: NB, SB, RAM, HDDs, processor

The change I made just before it all went wrong was to replace my Swiftech NB cooling block with a Koolance one.

I hope someone has some ideas, because I'm really tired of not being able to perform a basic computer mod like liquid cooling.

-M4F

More about : mobos dying

December 29, 2007 3:53:18 AM

Liquid cooling isn't too basic...

Anyways, what thermal material are you using?
December 29, 2007 4:07:24 AM

Yeah, but how many people have killed two mobos (possibly three) trying to do it? It's very frustrating. I know this system is more complex, but damn it, it was working this time, at least until the NB block's connectors started to leak. Thank goodness I use FluidXP non-conductive stuff; even if my mobo is dead, my video cards and such should still be ok.

Arctic silver for everything except the CPU. Because it's under a TEC block, the manufacturer recommended (and supplied) Arctic Ceramic instead.

-M4F
Related resources
December 29, 2007 4:14:09 AM

Why bother with liquid cooling when air-cooling suffice?

Was the last 2 motherboard the same ones?
December 29, 2007 4:17:21 AM

Mad4Power said:
Yeah, but how many people have killed two mobos (possibly three) trying to do it? It's very frustrating. I know this system is more complex, but damn it, it was working this time, at least until the NB block's connectors started to leak. Thank goodness I use FluidXP non-conductive stuff; even if my mobo is dead, my video cards and such should still be ok.

Arctic silver for everything except the CPU. Because it's under a TEC block, the manufacturer recommended (and supplied) Arctic Ceramic instead.

-M4F



AS5 is conductive and a horrible idea to use around the mobo. Any trace of it on the PCB can cause a short... I've killed a mobo with it before.
December 29, 2007 4:24:43 AM

cnumartyr said:
AS5 is conductive and a horrible idea to use around the mobo. Any trace of it on the PCB can cause a short... I've killed a mobo with it before.


REALLY? You mean all this time, I might have been killing my mobo's because I was using the wrong THERMAL STUFF??? There's no emoticon for what I'm feeling.

What do you recommend instead?

-M4F
December 29, 2007 4:29:48 AM

Mad4Power said:
REALLY? You mean all this time, I might have been killing my mobo's because I was using the wrong THERMAL STUFF??? There's no emoticon for what I'm feeling.

What do you recommend instead?

-M4F



I can't guarentee that's what is happening, but if you get any AS5 on the mobo and just wipe it off, it's still there.

I would use the Ceramique or MX-2 or Shin-Etsu X23 instead. All of them are non-conductive.
December 29, 2007 4:31:46 AM

Evilonigiri said:
Why bother with liquid cooling when air-cooling suffice?

Was the last 2 motherboard the same ones?


Air cooling was a bit warm for me, especially on my NB. liquid cooling is more efficient, and not only does it allow for great over-clocking (the only thing holding me back from 4.2GHz on a 2.4GHz CPU is my slow-ass ram) but it will allow me to pipe almost all the heat from my case out the window (by extending the radiator lines so the radiator exhausts to the outside air).

Plus, there's the fun of modding, and the bling factor ;)  (though I admit it is only bling if it works.

As for the mobo question:
the first mobo was a GA-965P-DS3
the second was a GA-P35-DS3L
the 965P came back to life, sort of, so I tried it again. Now it will power up, but not show any video of any kind. I think I pissed it off when I turned it on and then turned it off again while it was reloading the BIOS (it said the old settings were corrupt).

This latest mobo is another GA-P35-DS3L

-M4F
December 29, 2007 4:38:26 AM

cnumartyr said:
I can't guarentee that's what is happening, but if you get any AS5 on the mobo and just wipe it off, it's still there.

I would use the Ceramique or MX-2 or Shin-Etsu X23 instead. All of them are non-conductive.


Thanks:)  Any recommendation for removing the AS5 if just rubbing won't do it?

I bet that's the problem; the NB block slid around a bit when i was installing it, and it probably spread some of the AS5 to the little components surrounding the NB chip (it's one of those with a tiny square of raised chip in the center of a square of material that has a bunch of micro-components on it (probably caps or resistors)).

-M4F
December 29, 2007 5:00:33 AM

Mad4Power said:
Thanks:)  Any recommendation for removing the AS5 if just rubbing won't do it?

I bet that's the problem; the NB block slid around a bit when i was installing it, and it probably spread some of the AS5 to the little components surrounding the NB chip (it's one of those with a tiny square of raised chip in the center of a square of material that has a bunch of micro-components on it (probably caps or resistors)).

-M4F



Rubbing alcohol works great for removing it. The best thing (imo) is the Arti-Clean set... Otherwise just the purist isopropyl alcohol you can find.
!