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Anyone else annoyed by always having to...

Last response: in Home Theatre
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April 17, 2005 6:01:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

....manually change various settings on your HDTV and/or DD tuner, depending
on the sources.

I.e. --

You may have a preference for different brightness, contrast, color,
sharpness, ect settings for different video sources whether it be SD
broadcast, HD broadcast, DVD player, a game console, VCR, ect. While most
TV's have memory to store some of these settings for different sources, its
still far from seamless. My HDTV will automatically re-adjust itself for
different inputs and also SD versus HD, but once you get a lot of other
components feeding into it then you have to start manually re-configuring
all the time. I found one "workaround" though -- using the service codes to
reprogram the "hard settings" (Sports, Multimedia, and of course the
completely worthless store display burner). The service menu even allowed
the name of these hard settings to be changed, which I renamed to "DVD",
"XBox", "PS2-HD", "PS2-SD", ect. Still requires a button press to get to
though.

You may have a preference for different DD, DTS, Dolby Pro Logic I/II,
simulated surround sound, ect settings for different audio sources. Again,
its halfway seamless. Your DD receiver will reconfigure it's bass, treble,
ect based upon the input type -- but not from what the source is.

You may want 480i/p and 1080i channels to pass through the native format
without any conversion, but want 720p to be automatically converted to
1080i. Many HD boxes will do this, but Time Warner's Pace box won't.
Another annoyance.

Dozens more examples are possible. Just pick any combination. This is
2005. I thought we were supposed to have people floating around Jupiter
four years ago. LOL. Would it really be rocket surgery for the
manufacturers to make AV devices more intelligent? Maybe each device can
put out a identifying codes with it's signals-- and the TV/audio boxes could
automatically reconfigure themselves based on how you previously programmed
them.

Sorry to rant, just tired of always having to manually change settings! :^)

Cheers,
-Eric

More about : annoyed

April 17, 2005 6:01:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Rocket surgery?

MGoBlue

"Eric" <nospam@nospam.not> wrote in message
news:8sj8e.3271$Qu2.3089@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> ...manually change various settings on your HDTV and/or DD tuner,
> depending
> on the sources.
>
> I.e. --
>
> You may have a preference for different brightness, contrast, color,
> sharpness, ect settings for different video sources whether it be SD
> broadcast, HD broadcast, DVD player, a game console, VCR, ect. While
> most
> TV's have memory to store some of these settings for different sources,
> its
> still far from seamless. My HDTV will automatically re-adjust itself for
> different inputs and also SD versus HD, but once you get a lot of other
> components feeding into it then you have to start manually re-configuring
> all the time. I found one "workaround" though -- using the service codes
> to
> reprogram the "hard settings" (Sports, Multimedia, and of course the
> completely worthless store display burner). The service menu even
> allowed
> the name of these hard settings to be changed, which I renamed to "DVD",
> "XBox", "PS2-HD", "PS2-SD", ect. Still requires a button press to get to
> though.
>
> You may have a preference for different DD, DTS, Dolby Pro Logic I/II,
> simulated surround sound, ect settings for different audio sources.
> Again,
> its halfway seamless. Your DD receiver will reconfigure it's bass,
> treble,
> ect based upon the input type -- but not from what the source is.
>
> You may want 480i/p and 1080i channels to pass through the native format
> without any conversion, but want 720p to be automatically converted to
> 1080i. Many HD boxes will do this, but Time Warner's Pace box won't.
> Another annoyance.
>
> Dozens more examples are possible. Just pick any combination. This is
> 2005. I thought we were supposed to have people floating around Jupiter
> four years ago. LOL. Would it really be rocket surgery for the
> manufacturers to make AV devices more intelligent? Maybe each device can
> put out a identifying codes with it's signals-- and the TV/audio boxes
> could
> automatically reconfigure themselves based on how you previously
> programmed
> them.
>
> Sorry to rant, just tired of always having to manually change settings!
> :^)
>
> Cheers,
> -Eric
>
>
>



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April 17, 2005 6:06:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Oh, I know there are intelligent remotes out there that can have "macros"
programmed. Probably will get one soon. Would rather see stuff completely
seamless though. My HDTV can autosense signals coming in and reprogram
accordingly, but it would be cool if it knew what the source was as well.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 17, 2005 8:28:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Anyone who produces video should put a subsignal of some kind to indicate
"black" level, "white" level and "chroma" level. Then TV's can compensate
automatically to the best levels for the image. The same for audio. Anyone
transmitting would have to ensure that this signal was there as well.

Then you'd only need to tweak your TV once and then you'd know it was right
and a smart TV could even adjust for room lighting!

Ain't going to happen though. It makes WAY too much sense. (and yes, I'd
expect old content to be processed to include the new info)

"Eric" <nospam@nospam.not> wrote in message
news:8sj8e.3271$Qu2.3089@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> ...manually change various settings on your HDTV and/or DD tuner,
> depending
> on the sources.
>
> I.e. --
>
> You may have a preference for different brightness, contrast, color,
> sharpness, ect settings for different video sources whether it be SD
> broadcast, HD broadcast, DVD player, a game console, VCR, ect. While
> most
> TV's have memory to store some of these settings for different sources,
> its
> still far from seamless. My HDTV will automatically re-adjust itself for
> different inputs and also SD versus HD, but once you get a lot of other
> components feeding into it then you have to start manually re-configuring
> all the time. I found one "workaround" though -- using the service codes
> to
> reprogram the "hard settings" (Sports, Multimedia, and of course the
> completely worthless store display burner). The service menu even
> allowed
> the name of these hard settings to be changed, which I renamed to "DVD",
> "XBox", "PS2-HD", "PS2-SD", ect. Still requires a button press to get to
> though.
>
> You may have a preference for different DD, DTS, Dolby Pro Logic I/II,
> simulated surround sound, ect settings for different audio sources.
> Again,
> its halfway seamless. Your DD receiver will reconfigure it's bass,
> treble,
> ect based upon the input type -- but not from what the source is.
>
> You may want 480i/p and 1080i channels to pass through the native format
> without any conversion, but want 720p to be automatically converted to
> 1080i. Many HD boxes will do this, but Time Warner's Pace box won't.
> Another annoyance.
>
> Dozens more examples are possible. Just pick any combination. This is
> 2005. I thought we were supposed to have people floating around Jupiter
> four years ago. LOL. Would it really be rocket surgery for the
> manufacturers to make AV devices more intelligent? Maybe each device can
> put out a identifying codes with it's signals-- and the TV/audio boxes
> could
> automatically reconfigure themselves based on how you previously
> programmed
> them.
>
> Sorry to rant, just tired of always having to manually change settings!
> :^)
>
> Cheers,
> -Eric
>
>
April 17, 2005 4:19:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Noozer" <dont.spam@me.here> wrote in message
news:xBl8e.1044222$6l.521593@pd7tw2no...
> Anyone who produces video should put a subsignal of some kind to indicate
> "black" level, "white" level and "chroma" level. Then TV's can compensate
> automatically to the best levels for the image. The same for audio. Anyone
> transmitting would have to ensure that this signal was there as well.
>
> Then you'd only need to tweak your TV once and then you'd know it was
right
> and a smart TV could even adjust for room lighting!
>
> Ain't going to happen though. It makes WAY too much sense. (and yes, I'd
> expect old content to be processed to include the new info)
>

LOL, I like your cynicism. You are right -- that would make too much sense!

Cheers,
-Eric
Anonymous
April 18, 2005 11:16:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Noozer" <dont.spam@me.here> wrote:

>Anyone who produces video should put a subsignal of some kind to indicate
>"black" level, "white" level and "chroma" level. Then TV's can compensate
>automatically to the best levels for the image. The same for audio. Anyone
>transmitting would have to ensure that this signal was there as well.
>
>Then you'd only need to tweak your TV once and then you'd know it was right
>and a smart TV could even adjust for room lighting!
>
>Ain't going to happen though. It makes WAY too much sense. (and yes, I'd
>expect old content to be processed to include the new info)

It was tried a long time ago, with analog television. The Vertical
Interval Reference (VIR) signal was a line carrying references for
those three plus chroma phase (tint). The idea was that it would be
added at the output of the production switcher and stay with the video
wherever it went. Gain and phase errors could be corrected anywhere
along the transmission path, including in the home TV set. GE even
made such a TV.

It failed because many TV engineers didn't understand its purpose.
They saw it as just another test signal, which they were used to
deleting and inserting at will. One popular use was to insert a new
VIR at the station's output to the transmitter and use the received
signal to "correct" the output to compensate for transmitter
variations. When they inserted their own VIR they usually did not
correct the incoming signal first, so the reference was lost. As a
result the few sets with VIR correction often looked worse with it
turned on.

You should be able to set your display up using standard test patterns
from Avia, Digital Video Essentials, HDNet or any station's color bars
and not have to readjust for different sources or different programs
from the same source to get an acceptable picture. Unfortunately
that's not the case.

Del Mibbler
Anonymous
May 3, 2005 4:59:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 07:16:42 +0000, Del Mibbler wrote:

> "Noozer" <dont.spam@me.here> wrote:
>
> It failed because many TV engineers didn't understand its purpose.
> They saw it as just another test signal, which they were used to
> deleting and inserting at will. One popular use was to insert a new
> VIR at the station's output to the transmitter and use the received
> signal to "correct" the output to compensate for transmitter
> variations. When they inserted their own VIR they usually did not
> correct the incoming signal first, so the reference was lost. As a
> result the few sets with VIR correction often looked worse with it
> turned on.

Wow a 20 year flashback...
You were correct too many stations did not understand what the VIR signal
was about. But properly executed it was great. That old TV equipment
required constant attention. and the VIR was supposed to compensate for
varying problems in the transport.

The problem has not gotten any better with the move to digital, I see
stations trans coding signals back and forth so that the signal you get on
DTV may not be as High Res as it appears.


--
Korbin Dallas
The name was changed to protect the guilty.
!