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cooling a q6600

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January 12, 2008 9:08:18 PM

Hi, everyone.

I've collected my components and I'm beginning the install on my second build. I've got a Q6600 and a Gigabyte ds4 mobo. I've got a Rosewill CPU cooler. I've got other stuff, too, but that's not important right now. Important, though, is that I found out that installing an aftermarket cooler on a BFG 8800 GT OC 512 will invalidate the lifetime warranty, so I've decided not to do it.

That got me thinking...will installing an aftermarket cooling device on the Intel Q6600 invalidate a warranty?

Does it matter?

Should I do it?

Thanks for answering these questions--I'm just waiting until I get the word of you experts before I complete my build.

Thanks!

More about : cooling q6600

January 12, 2008 9:56:34 PM

Here's the deal on warranties...

Overclocking a Q6600 voids the warranty, period. Normally there isn't a way to tell.

Using an aftermarket cooler on a Q6600 won't void anything. It's impossible to put 2 Q6600s next to each other and say "this one had aftermarket and this one didn't."

As far as the aftermaret cooler on the 8800 GT. Save the original one. If the card ever craps out put the stock one back on and try to get it warrantied. It works more often than not.
January 12, 2008 10:40:09 PM

Well supposedly you're to use Intel-approved heatsinks, but who will know?

Like what cnumartyr said, it's nearly impossible to tell what you did, as long as you revert it back to the original.
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January 12, 2008 10:40:18 PM

Thanks for the tips. Wish I had consulted you before I sent back the Accelero S1 & Turbo fan. Maybe I'll reorder these if I see a problem with the 8800 GT stock cooling.
January 12, 2008 10:42:06 PM

gary101 said:
Thanks for the tips. Wish I had consulted you before I sent back the Accelero S1 & Turbo fan. Maybe I'll reorder these if I see a problem with the 8800 GT stock cooling.


The one thing you have to watch for is stickers. My DFI Blood Iron had a sticker on the NB heatsink that was designed to tear so they knew if you had removed it. It had big letters "WARRANTY VOID IF REMOVED."
January 12, 2008 10:44:45 PM

I think that's so stupid. I owned an emachine before and there was a sticker on the case that prevented me from opening it unless I wanted to void my warrenty. All I wanted to do was to add a new vidcard (6800OC lol).
January 12, 2008 10:49:35 PM

As I understand it, there's a sticker on the BFG version of the 8800 GT OC that tends to fall off and into the cooling fan anyway. Don't know whether there's one designed to prevent removal of the cooling unit.
January 12, 2008 10:53:54 PM

gary101 said:
As I understand it, there's a sticker on the BFG version of the 8800 GT OC that tends to fall off and into the cooling fan anyway. Don't know whether there's one designed to prevent removal of the cooling unit.


As long as it doesn't say void if removed or something, it's fine.
January 12, 2008 10:58:53 PM

cnumartyr,

If I'm reading between the lines correctly, it sounds like you recommend replacing the cooling unit. Would you care to tell me the pros/cons of doing so/not doing so?
January 12, 2008 11:05:01 PM

gary101 said:
cnumartyr,

If I'm reading between the lines correctly, it sounds like you recommend replacing the cooling unit. Would you care to tell me the pros/cons of doing so/not doing so?


The 8800 GT runs particularly hot because of the single slot cooling configuration.

*IF* you want to overclock it I would suggest aftermarket cooling. If you are leaving it stock turn the fan up with Rivatuner to as loud as you are comfortable with. The target range on my 8800 GTS was 78C under operation.. that was a bit hot to me, so I turned the fan up and OC'd a bit. Never goes over 60C now.
January 12, 2008 11:06:44 PM

That's why you get a 8800GTS instead of the 8800GT.

Well, at least I would anyways.
January 12, 2008 11:07:07 PM

That's with the stock cooling?

Also, I've got a Cooler Master 690 case, and I can put an extra case fan on it situated such that it blows right onto the GPU. That should help, too, I think.
January 12, 2008 11:08:44 PM

gary101 said:
That's with the stock cooling?

Also, I've got a Cooler Master 690 case, and I can put an extra case fan on it situated such that it blows right onto the GPU. That should help, too, I think.


It doesn't help nearly as much as you'd think.

The TARGET temp in my BIOS for my card is 78C. The fan only runs at 29% or so. With it turned up manually to 60% the card runs around 60C under load overclocked.

I have a CM690. I have an 8800 GTS. The dual slot solution is a bit better... but an HR-03GT would be even better.
January 12, 2008 11:11:19 PM

gary101 said:
That's with the stock cooling?

Also, I've got a Cooler Master 690 case, and I can put an extra case fan on it situated such that it blows right onto the GPU. That should help, too, I think.

Yeah the stock cooling of the 8800GT sucks a lot. Max cfm for that little fan is like 11cfm.

Anyways since you have a CM 690, I highly suggest you to outfit the maximum number of fans. I recommend Yat loon fans since they are really cheap (~$3.50 for the 120mm fans). Perhaps you can mount a Yat loon 140mm fan ($4.50).
January 12, 2008 11:17:12 PM

Do you know if there's any difference in temps between the GT and the GTS? Maybe I'm nit-picking, but I'm getting all worried about heat, since I've killed a bunch of hardware in the previous build due to heat problems.

How do you measure the temps?
January 12, 2008 11:23:31 PM

gary101 said:
Do you know if there's any difference in temps between the GT and the GTS? Maybe I'm nit-picking, but I'm getting all worried about heat, since I've killed a bunch of hardware in the previous build due to heat problems.

How do you measure the temps?


They both will probably run about the same temp at stock.. thing is the GTS can run cooler.

The temps you can measure with speed fan... nVidia has temp sensors.
January 12, 2008 11:25:42 PM

Should I worry?
January 12, 2008 11:27:48 PM

Evilonigiri said:
Yeah the stock cooling of the 8800GT sucks a lot. Max cfm for that little fan is like 11cfm.

Anyways since you have a CM 690, I highly suggest you to outfit the maximum number of fans. I recommend Yat loon fans since they are really cheap (~$3.50 for the 120mm fans). Perhaps you can mount a Yat loon 140mm fan ($4.50).



cnumartyr, how do you think this will impact heat dispersal? I could max out the case fans...
January 12, 2008 11:31:07 PM

gary101 said:
cnumartyr, how do you think this will impact heat dispersal? I could max out the case fans...


I only think you need 3 fans in that case. It keeps everything I have sufficiently cool.

One side bottom and one front intake. One rear exhaust. I have Yate Loon High Speeds that I've undervolted with a Rheobus and it does just fine.

Answer this one thing.. do you plan to OC the 8800 GT at all?
January 12, 2008 11:35:27 PM

I'm pretty novice when it comes to this stuff, so I am not sure whether I understand the benefit of doing so, nor do I understand the process, and don't get me started on messing with voltage--confuses the heck out of me. So, no. I probably won't. Unless you can convince me to do it.

BTW, I thought this thing came overclocked.
January 12, 2008 11:38:17 PM

gary101 said:
I'm pretty novice when it comes to this stuff, so I am not sure whether I understand the benefit of doing so, nor do I understand the process, and don't get me started on messing with voltage--confuses the heck out of me. So, no. I probably won't. Unless you can convince me to do it.

BTW, I thought this thing came overclocked.


Overclocking GPUs is 100x easier than a CPU. There is no changing voltages.. you don't have the ability to.

The card is factory overclocked from nVidia Reference Specifications. That doesn't mean it can't go farther.

If you want to learn we can teach you without a problem.. You will want to get Rivatuner anyways (one OCing program for Video Cards) to up the fan speed to help out on temps.

Normally.. 90% of the people that buy that card won't think anything of it... so I wouldn't worry. It's just personal preference.. I have a habit of OCing and trying to maximize temperatures.
January 12, 2008 11:41:13 PM

gary101 said:
I'm pretty novice when it comes to this stuff, so I am not sure whether I understand the benefit of doing so, nor do I understand the process, and don't get me started on messing with voltage--confuses the heck out of me. So, no. I probably won't. Unless you can convince me to do it.

BTW, I thought this thing came overclocked.

Bfg does slightly OC their cards.

Anyways you do not need to adjust the voltage of the vidcards to OC. All you need to do is download Rivatuner and up the frequencies and that's it. If it's too high, your games won't be stable, so you lower the speeds. It's as simple as that really.

Performance impact will be something like 5-10% more frames.

The best thing is no one would be able to tell you OC'ed it.
January 12, 2008 11:47:08 PM

Well, due to the aforementioned heat problems, I'm really interested in maintaining cool temperatures. However, I've also got competing interests in performance and price.

I think I mentioned earlier that I had some aftermarket GPU cooling, but sent it back (Since I'm still a poor graduate student, I'm concerned about invalidating warranties). I figured that if the GPU crashes, they'll send me a new one (confirmed via email from BFG themselves). Since I'm still a poor graduate student, I'm concerned about invalidating warranties.

How much benefit would I see in OCing? How much impact might it have on temperatures and subsequent performance, assuming I don't upgrade to an aftermarket cooler? Would there be any impact on hardware other than the GPU from the heat if I OC only the GPU?

(by the way, you guys are awesome! thanks for answering so many questions here.)
January 12, 2008 11:50:22 PM

OCing won't cause any problems as long as things are kept in check (temperatures). And you make sure to check for artifacts in games (ATiTool, which we will explain when you decide to OC or not).

I think we scared you a bit.. but the thing would be fine as it's covered by a warranty. I just personally prefer things running cooler as I OC them anyways.

Once you get things built, download speed Fan and let's see where you are at with temperatures and the like.

Edit: It also depends on your games.. I play Crysis at 16x10 at all high. OCing helps me get a bit better frame rates so it's playable.
January 12, 2008 11:53:45 PM

So, if Evilonigiri is right, I'll see an increase of 5-10% in framerate--meaning Crysis would run at roughly 47.25-50 frames versus 45. Is that even worth considering?

And if not, can I get by on the current system for a while without overclocking and with minimal heat problems?

Build I'm working on:
Cooler Master 690 Case
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 (with Rosewill Cooler)
Gigabyte P35-DS4 rev. 2 motherboard
2 GB (2 x 1 GB) Crucial Ballistix 8500 RAM @ 1066 Mhz
BFG GeForce 8800 GT OC 512 MB (with stock cooling--should I upgrade in violation of the warranty?)
Corsair HX520 PSU
LG 20X DVD +/- RW w/ Lightscribe (transferred from existing rig and IDE, so will be on an IDE-> PCI card)
Seagate 500 GB SATA HDD perpendicular (though this may have to wait for a sale or I might buy s/t else)
2 X WD 250 GB IDE HDDs (transferred from existing rig)
Pair of JBL speakers which I like the sound of, but aren't shielded
Old 19" Samsung SyncMaster 763MB monitor that works fine. Keeping it until I can afford some nice LCD that works well for gaming (Any thoughts on these inexpensive 2ms Chimea LCDs that I've seen lately at Bensbargains.net???)

Updating from P4 2.4 GHz, 1 GB RAM, ASRock P4I45D Mobo, BFG GeForce 7800 GT OC (AGP and running only X4)
January 12, 2008 11:56:06 PM

I think you'd be fine for what you want to do.

We're just crazy about OCing... I mean look at my sig.
January 12, 2008 11:56:15 PM

NO! If you even touch the card, you're warrenty is voided! ;) 

Joking aside, OCing is a real good idea if you want about a 5-10% increase in performance. However it may shorten the life of the gpu. How much the life shortens depends on how much you overclock and how hot it is. But OC enthusiast counters with the reasoning that most people will upgrade by the time so worrying about the card dying is no biggie.

Heat will increase, perhaps as much as 5-10C. So you'll need better cooling.
January 12, 2008 11:56:24 PM

cnumartyr said:
OCing won't cause any problems as long as things are kept in check (temperatures). And you make sure to check for artifacts in games (ATiTool, which we will explain when you decide to OC or not).

I think we scared you a bit.. but the thing would be fine as it's covered by a warranty. I just personally prefer things running cooler as I OC them anyways.

Once you get things built, download speed Fan and let's see where you are at with temperatures and the like.

Edit: It also depends on your games.. I play Crysis at 16x10 at all high. OCing helps me get a bit better frame rates so it's playable.


I'm used to playing games at pretty low res--just finished Witcher at like 800 X 600 or whatever, with most detail turned off. Oblivion runs, but often stutters. Most detail is turned to medium, low, or off. I certainly want better than that, but I don't have to have top o' the line performance. Just want something that isn't going to make me complain about performance in detailed 3D games.
January 13, 2008 12:02:33 AM

Evilonigiri said:
NO! If you even touch the card, you're warrenty is voided! ;) 

Joking aside, OCing is a real good idea if you want about a 5-10% increase in performance. However it may shorten the life of the gpu. How much the life shortens depends on how much you overclock and how hot it is. But OC enthusiast counters with the reasoning that most people will upgrade by the time so worrying about the card dying is no biggie.

Heat will increase, perhaps as much as 5-10C. So you'll need better cooling.


But I'll be fine without touching it?

Convince me to become an OC enthusiast. Why does 5-10% matter? Seems relatively insignificant considering the (potential) risks/costs.
January 13, 2008 12:07:04 AM

gary101 said:
But I'll be fine without touching it?

Convince me to become an OC enthusiast. Why does 5-10% matter? Seems relatively insignificant considering the (potential) risks/costs.

Okay here we go!

Most games, 30fps is playable. However the game may go below 30 fps, resulting into stuttering of some sort. Ocing the vidcard to bring a 5% increase would smooth the game play out. Perhaps you would be able to go play a higher setting.

The hardcore OCer would get a cheaper card, such as the 8800GT and OC it to heaven. That way you get the performance of a top end card for $270 and some time ocing.
January 13, 2008 12:07:09 AM

gary101 said:
But I'll be fine without touching it?

Convince me to become an OC enthusiast. Why does 5-10% matter? Seems relatively insignificant considering the (potential) risks/costs.



If I convince you to, the bug will get you.

I OC to bench. 3DMark06. I got 17k with a single card on all air. I was happy.

As far as Crysis goes.. I *LIKE* playing games at 16x10 maxed out. If I could OC my card further I would, it's choppy with 4xAA. Get a good game with maxed out res and see the difference and you WILL start OCing. It's just addicting.

5-10% means a lot when you realize it's the difference between stuttering and not stuttering.
January 13, 2008 12:10:49 AM

Perhaps if you don't like to take risks, you could buy one of those highly factory-OCed vidcards. However they cost around $20-$50 premium and most people would save that money and OC themselves.
January 13, 2008 12:12:30 AM

I can buy that. I suppose with unlimited (or at least LESS limited) resources, I could get into the "maximum performance" thing, too. However, at this point, I suspect that the difference that I'll see between my old and new rigs will be sufficient to please me, so perhaps it's best for me to avoid the bug.

Since we're talking percentages, though....can you estimate the percentage performance jump I'm likely to see from the old to the new builds?
January 13, 2008 12:14:00 AM

gary101 said:
I can buy that. I suppose with unlimited (or at least LESS limited) resources, I could get into the "maximum performance" thing, too. However, at this point, I suspect that the difference that I'll see between my old and new rigs will be sufficient to please me, so perhaps it's best for me to avoid the bug.

Since we're talking percentages, though....can you estimate the percentage performance jump I'm likely to see from the old to the new builds?

What was your old build? Could you list the specs out?
January 13, 2008 12:15:07 AM

Evilonigiri, so for $20-50, I get the 5-10% benny of OCing without invalidating the warranty? Where does one find these highly OC'ed cards?
January 13, 2008 12:21:03 AM

gary101 said:
Evilonigiri, so for $20-50, I get the 5-10% benny of OCing without invalidating the warranty? Where does one find these highly OC'ed cards?

Weeell...There's a the XFX 8800GT XXX series or something that's highly Oced.

Oh look, here's an Asus at 700mhz core:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
January 13, 2008 12:24:17 AM

Oh, thought I did list the specs. Maybe another forum...

it's a little old now, and I don't remember all the details. I'm going to guesstimate some of these:

P4 2.4 GHz, 1 GB 667 MHz memory (Kingston or PNY, I think), ASRock P4I45D mobo (533 MHz FSB), BFG GeForce 7800 GT OC 256 MB, 2 WD Caviar (I think) hard disks @ 250 GB, one 120 GB WD HD that just crapped out, LG 20X ATA DVD +/- RW w/ Lightscribe.
January 13, 2008 12:27:12 AM

I thought the BFG 8800 GT OC generally outperformed the others. Within the $300 or less price range, are the others to be considering?
January 13, 2008 12:29:47 AM

gary101 said:
I thought the BFG 8800 GT OC generally outperformed the others. Within the $300 or less price range, are the others to be considering?



All 8800 GTs are the same other than clocks.

So in theory.. whichever has the higher GPU/Shaders/Memory will perform the best.

Edit: I got my eVGA 8800 GTS for $339 with a free copy of Crysis. I think it was a great deal.
January 13, 2008 12:31:39 AM

gary101 said:
I thought the BFG 8800 GT OC generally outperformed the others. Within the $300 or less price range, are the others to be considering?

BFG has the best services. Worth the price if you're gonna keep that card for a long time.
January 13, 2008 12:33:17 AM

I'd say depending on what game, and resolution, you see anywhere from 80% - 500% performance gains.
January 13, 2008 12:34:46 AM

When you say services, you mean customer service? They told me via email that the warranty was for MY lifetime, not that of the card. Seems good.

I'm assuming, then, that you'd say performance for this architecture among the various manufacturers is about same?
January 13, 2008 12:38:27 AM

gary101 said:
When you say services, you mean customer service? They told me via email that the warranty was for MY lifetime, not that of the card. Seems good.

I'm assuming, then, that you'd say performance for this architecture among the various manufacturers is about same?

Right customer service-wise, BFG is the best. They are very caring and helpful. Of course there are other compaines that has life-time warranty, however BFG has the best services.

All 8800GT and GTS are the same. The only diff is the sticker and perhaps the clock speeds.
January 13, 2008 12:40:03 AM

Evilonigiri said:
I'd say depending on what game, and resolution, you see anywhere from 80% - 500% performance gains.



I know that's just an estimate, but that seems pretty good to me. 1024 X 768 is my current screen resolution. Don't need it to be freakin' high-def (though wouldn't that be nice...). Out of curiosity, what games are you using for those extremes in your estimate?
January 13, 2008 12:41:41 AM

gary101 said:
I know that's just an estimate, but that seems pretty good to me. 1024 X 768 is my current screen resolution. Don't need it to be freakin' high-def (though wouldn't that be nice...). Out of curiosity, what games are you using for those extremes in your estimate?

CPU intensive games such as Supreme commander, which effectively uses 4 cores. Supcom is the most intensive cpu/ram game out there.
January 13, 2008 12:46:09 AM

So the new build should be able to play supreme commander acceptably without overclocking or any extreme cooling solutions whereas my current build will likely just struggle trying to play it?

January 13, 2008 12:49:37 AM

gary101 said:
So the new build should be able to play supreme commander acceptably without overclocking or any extreme cooling solutions whereas my current build will likely just struggle trying to play it?


Yep.

I don't have extreme cooling. I do everything on air.
January 13, 2008 12:50:03 AM

gary101 said:
So the new build should be able to play supreme commander acceptably without overclocking or any extreme cooling solutions whereas my current build will likely just struggle trying to play it?

I'm sorry to say that Supcom is so demanding cpu wise that stock isn't going to cut it. I have a Q6600 and a 8800GTS 320mb and my pc struggles during the latter half the the game. (it's an RTS game). There's about 3000units on a fairly large map before my cpu starts studdering. So I OCed it to 3.15Ghz and now there isn't lag. The only problem is the OS, which is XP. It has a 2gig ram limit for any program and once it exceeds it, the game crashes.
January 13, 2008 12:58:27 AM

Hmmm... I'm going to be using XP Pro SP2. Don't want to crash, but also will only have 2 GB RAM, so maybe it's not an issue. Will the fact that mine's a 512 MB card vs. your 320 mb card prevent or help minimize the struggles in the latter part of the game?
January 13, 2008 12:59:27 AM

Maybe "extreme" was a bit...well...extreme. I meant "non-stock."

Since we've wandered (wonderfully) far afield from the original post topic, I think I should sum up where I'm at right now:

--I think, per your information, I'll probably do the aftermarket cooling of the Q6600 (Rosewill cooler: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...), but leave the 8800 cooling at stock at least for now.

--Not going to overclock anything at this time.

--Going to hold my breath and hope that a GPU upgrade will be all I'll need to do in the next few years. Luckily, the mobo will accomodate the 45 nm chips if I need to do a CPU upgrade, though.
!