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GUIDE: Overclocking On EP/P35-DS3L v1.3.1 [UPDATED: 10/2/2008]

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a b K Overclocking
January 13, 2008 1:30:01 PM

UPDATES:

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P35-DS3L Overclocking Guide

Update 3/4/2008:
Images now hosted by Flickr.com instead of MediaFire. Also added helpful information provided by homerdog

Update 3/18/2008
Included more detailed explanation of BIOS options and recommended settings.

Updated 3/19/2008
Minor corrections.

Updated 4/14/2008
Added new Prime95 Images. More text edits. Added Disclaimer

Updated 4/17/2008
Fixed text errors (phrasing errors, ie random %$# symbols through out page) after THF forum updates.

Updated 4/22/2008
Included new note under "CPU Host Frequency" about BIOS versions.

Updated 4/25/2008
Included note to future P35-DS3x DS4x owners.

Updated 5/15/2008
Included update that effects newer owners of P35-DS3L. (aka EP35-DS3L)

Updated 6/7/2008
Included new BIOS setting image with explanations. Version updated to 1.3.

Updated 10/2/1008
Minor updates in the text.
=================================================================
=================================================================


IMPORTANT NOTE TO FUTURE P35-DS3L ( and P35 DS3x /DS4x and other P35 chipset based) OWNERS:
If you are planing on getting RAM natively higher than DDR2 800 be aware that there will be compatibility issues. Many users reports and my personal testing has shown that there is a very good chance you will run in to issues with RAM higher than DDR2 800, such as DDR2 1066. I recommend you get quality DDR2 800 RAM and run them at 1:1 ratio or overclock the RAM. This issue dose not apply to DDR2 800 RAM that has been overclocked.


Note to EP35-DS3L owners: To "Disable" DES all you have to do is to not install DES program.
Special thanks to knotknut for his information.
Link 1
Link 2


Disclaimer: I (or any one else on THF) is not responsible for damage to equipment due to incorrect overclocking/excessive overclocking,etc. Do overclocking at your own risk. Due to the nature of the manufacturing processes for CPU,etc your results might not be exact as others.



BIOS OPTIONS IN DETAIL:

Note: These settings are very smiler/ same on all Gigabyte Motherboards.
Note: Users have reported that to successfully use 400Mhz FSB you must have F8b BIOS(For P35-DS3L) and F5 (For EP35-DS3L installed

R.G.B.: Helps to enhance the performance of the GPU and
VRAM. "Auto" allow the BIOS to automatically set the R.G.B. mode based on system configurations. This Option must be set to "Auto" for successful overclock.


CPU Clock Ratio: This is the CPU Multiplier. The lowest it can reach is 6x (most of the time) and the highest is dependent on the CPU. I recommend that you set this to the highest possible due to the fact that it puts fewer limits on the FSB (i.e. Less likely to hit an FSB wall etc.). But, there are cases in which it should or could be lowered.

CPU Host Clock Control: This option is "Disabled" by default. You MUST change this to "Enabled" in order to overclock the CPU.

CPU Host Frequency (Mhz): This is the FSB. Increase this value by 50-70Mhz over your Stock FSB during your first attempt.

For an 800 MHz FSB this is set to 200 MHz.
For a 1066 MHz FSB this is set to 266 MHz.
For a 1333 MHz FSB this is set to 333 MHz.
You can also enter any other value like 300 (1200FSB).

Change this item to reach the desired speed. This multiplied by the CPU multiplier gives the clock speed. I recommend that you change this by 50-100Mhz during the first few test phases to narrow down the stable overclock. Then after you reach the Maximum Clock speed (the point at which Prime95 fail in less than 5 hours) decrease the FSB by 20-50Mhz or increase the CPU core voltage .

Note: Users have reported that to successfully use 400Mhz FSB you must have F8b BIOS installed

CPU Frequency: This is the speed after any changes in the FSB and/or Multiplier.
This is equal to:

Multiplier * FSB = CPU Frequency (CPU Speed)

Example:
10*300=3000Mhz



PCI Express Frequency (Mhz): This is the PCIe frequency for the PCIe slots. Keep this at 100Mhz or "Auto" .

C.I.A.2: CPU Intelligent Accelerator 2 (C.I.A.2) is a system designed to automatically adjust the CPU Clock speed by a given percentage. This option is "Disabled" by default. It must be set to "Disabled" in order to successfully overclock the CPU .

Performance Enhance: Must be set to "Standard" for a successful overclock.


System Memory Multiplier (SPD): This is the RAM SPD. Change this item so that the "Memory Frequency" shown below the SPD is not exceeded. It is OK to be under the "Memory Frequency" shown.


Memory Frequency (Mhz): The first RAM value listed (I will call this the "Rated RAM Speed" to make life easier) (to the left ) is the normal speed of the RAM being used; the second (to the right) is the memory frequency that is automatically adjusted according to the "CPU Host Frequency (Mhz)" and "System Memory Multiplier" settings. I would strongly suggest you decrease the SPD to stay at or below the "Rated RAM Speed". If your RAM is overclockable (i.e. RAM like the Crucial Ballastix) you should still set the SPD to the "Rated RAM Speed" as it would be one less variable in a CPU overclocking failure until you find the best stable overclock. I recommend that you DO NOT overclock the RAM until you reach a stable CPU speed.

System Voltage Control: Determines whether to manually set the system voltages (i.e. CPU core voltage, RAM voltage, PCIe voltage, etc). "Auto" lets BIOS automatically set the system voltages as required. I recommend that you set this to "Auto" only if your overclock is small like 10-11%. Set this to "Disable" if your overclock is high (i.e. 400+Mhz CPU speed increase). Also set this to "Disable" if you need to change RAM voltages, this is specially true for most high performance RAM like the Crucial Ballastix and Corsair XMS2, etc. If your RAM is higher than 1.8v you must set this to "Disabled" . ***(see near end of this section)

DDR2 OverVoltage Control: This is the RAM voltage. Increase this by +0.1v increments to reach the voltage specified by the ram manufacture. The standard voltage is 1.8v. So if your voltage is rated as 2.2v increase this to +0.4v since 1.8 + 0.4 = 2.2.



Rated RAM voltage - 1.8 = The needed voltage increase

Example:
2.2 -1.8 = 0.4


PCI-E OverVoltage Control: Allows you to set PCIe voltage. There should be no need to change this value for 98% of the overclockers.

FSB OverVoltage Control: Allows you to increase the FSB voltage. Increase this to reach stability under high FSB (i.e. 310Mhz+).

(G)MCH OverVoltage Control: This is the Northbridge voltage. Most overclockers will not need to change this setting. Change this to increase stability under certain FSBs (i.e. 420Mhz+). Note that an increase in this setting WILL produce increase motherboard heat output. A Northbridge cooler is recommended for most P35/X38 motherboards even if you are not changing the MCH voltage. Gigabyte motherboards with out Ultra Cool should have a small Northbridge fan ( I noticed a 8C drop in my motherboard temperatures once I installed a 40mm fan on the heat sink on my P35-DS3L.).

CPU Voltage Control: Allows you to set the CPU voltage. Increase the voltage little by little until you reach stability at a given CPU speed*. Increasing this setting WILL cause an increase in CPU temperatures, so therefore a good CPU cooler is highly recommended. You should also monitor your temperatures through software like CoreTemp. DO NOT LET CPU TEMPERATURES EXCEED 65C. If your temperatures exceed 65C you are still safe but long term operation will not be advisable. You should NEVER let the CPU reach thermal threshold (Tjunction). This is the point where the CPU automatically decreases the Multiplier to 6x, even if SpeedStep is disabled.

Normal CPU Vcore: This is the standard CPU voltage at stock settings.

--------------------
*** Some users have reported that decreasing the CPU voltage will allow an increase in the overclock/stability. This is due to the fact that less voltage means less heat therefore more stable overclock. This is mainly true for most of the E6xxx CPUs and E8xxx.
================================================================
///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

++Go with the SpeedFan temps. Those temps were calibrated according to the
Core 2 Quad and Duo Temperature Guide by CompuTronix ++


The CPU on that motherboard is a E2180. The CPU has been stress tested with Prime95.








==================================================================

CHANGING THE tRD VALUE

Note: To gain acces to these settings press "Ctrl"+ "F1" in the main screen. tRD value is listed as "Static tRead Value". It is recommended to have F5 BIOS or later.

One of the most important and often overlooked settings is the MCH read delay (tRD). Without going into too much detail I will say that, similar to memory timings, the lower this value is the better your system will perform. However, setting this too low will compromise system stability, and if you go REALLY low your system will fail to POST.

This review from AnandTech does an excellent job explaining this critical setting. I recommend starting at page 4, but the quick and dirty can be found on page 9.

Setting tRD on the DS3L can be a bit tricky. The "Performance Enhance" setting adjusts it as follows:
Standard__tRD=11
Turbo_____tRD=6
Extreme___I have never been able to POST at this setting, so I don't know

On my system I am able to boot into Windows with Turbo, but Prime fails after ~2 seconds. Backing off to Standard will make things nice and stable, but the performance hit is noticeable. So how do we go about fine tuning the tRD on this board?

It's easy really actually. The DS3L refers to tRD as "Static tRead Value." Manually setting this will override the default "Performance Enhance" value. Weird I know, but that's it. Setting this to 8 allows my system to be completely stable at a FSB of 400MHz while yielding a nice performance boost over the default "Standard" setting of tRD=11.
(by: homerdog)
==================================================================
==================================================================

Please post your settings, OCing success, BIOS settings image,etc. This would help people with smiler set ups to narrow down voltage ranges,etc.
January 14, 2008 4:34:17 PM

This was the only guide I needed to help me Overclock my e2180 to 3.0ghz, great job shadow! :D 
a b K Overclocking
January 14, 2008 6:10:33 PM

^Will edit the text ASAP.

edit: Text finally edited on v1.3. :) 
January 14, 2008 10:54:20 PM

I got the same board with a 6750 , got it to 3.0GHZ , the only thing holding me back is my 600 mhz ram , already got it to 750mhz!thinking of getting 800mhz ddr2 to really push the cpu , but that'll come after a new case and a few new heatsinks:) 
January 15, 2008 2:00:06 AM

THANK-YOU! I was looking for this but nobody seemed to have it. I have a e6750 like ^this guy. When i want some more speed i'll use this. Again thank you.
January 15, 2008 1:17:19 PM

Right. Just tell me how to squeeze that last 50MHz out of my P4 631 and I'll be happy.

Been bashing my head against that particular wall since September last year.
January 16, 2008 6:09:30 AM

yeah, one last thing. just set the PCI Express Frequency(Mhz) to 100Mhz.
January 16, 2008 6:51:00 AM


Do these steps work with E6750 processors too?

a b K Overclocking
January 16, 2008 9:36:48 PM

^Agreed.

Run Prime95 for at least 5 hours.
January 17, 2008 2:47:31 PM

i heard one guy saying (in some forum) that primer should be ran for 24hr for maximum stability!
January 18, 2008 5:37:15 AM

I prefer to leave Prime95 running for a solid weekend, and then use the notebook or something. Running Prime for 48 hours also forces any inadequacies in a cooling systems ability to handle heat over the long term to become apparent.

Incidentally, mine takes 5 minutes to hit 53ºC from 38ºC at idle, and a further 17 hours to eventually peak at 65ºC. [/have to get the second rad installed STAT!]
January 18, 2008 9:46:41 AM

Mugz......48 hours seems a little much..no?

Will you ever have your PC on full load for that long. I usually do an 8 hour test and then a 12 hour Blend test.
January 18, 2008 9:56:48 AM

Not a bad idea, I'll post one up for the P5K-E with the 0906 BIOS for 45nm.
January 18, 2008 3:55:51 PM

Mugz said:
I prefer to leave Prime95 running for a solid weekend, and then use the notebook or something. Running Prime for 48 hours also forces any inadequacies in a cooling systems ability to handle heat over the long term to become apparent.

Incidentally, mine takes 5 minutes to hit 53ºC from 38ºC at idle, and a further 17 hours to eventually peak at 65ºC. [/have to get the second rad installed STAT!]


Heh, a weekend? In my case a fail after 6 hours was good enough, I've using it for week or so now and have not had anything funky happen yet. I thought the recommended was 8 hours or so? Also isn't the HS considered 'fully absorbed by 10 minutes. I guess it's true considering after checking it out for 10 minutes and then many hours later it was the same using core temp. Just for an experiment prime it for 10 minutes and compare those temps to the final temps you got.
January 18, 2008 3:59:37 PM

bildo123 said:
Heh, a weekend? In my case a fail after 6 hours was good enough, I've using it for week or so now and have not had anything funky happen yet. I thought the recommended was 8 hours or so?


The makers of Prime95 recommend 24 hours.

I (from personal experience) think that 8 hours of Small FFT and 12 hours of Blend is plenty.
a b K Overclocking
January 18, 2008 8:42:20 PM

^Agreed. Prime95 duration depends on personal preference or if you want to fell better about the stability :D  . The MINIMUM should be 4-5 hours.
January 18, 2008 11:34:20 PM

All I have to say to Mugz is "STOP WASTING ELECTRICITY!"
January 20, 2008 6:16:46 AM

lol oni.


Great guide shadow, I'll be referring to this with my DS3L and E8400 next week when my parts arrive =)
January 20, 2008 12:42:07 PM

cnumartyr said:
The makers of Prime95 recommend 24 hours.

I (from personal experience) think that 8 hours of Small FFT and 12 hours of Blend is plenty.


i did 8+hrs of small FFT. n didnt bother about the Blend at all. being running my system for 3 monthes now. so far seems stable.
January 20, 2008 2:21:39 PM

Well, I finally got around to running memtest86+ and had an error! So I decided to go back to 3Ghz on the E2180 and set my voltages to a safe stable level as well as the timings on the memory, and 17+ hours later im memtest86+ stable. I guess this will be my holding ground. I'm to lazy to see if it was the OC high voltage on the CPU (because memtest does more than the ram modules, it does the cpu cache's etc') or If it was because I put my timings on auto. Either way all my corners are covered in the posistion im in. I think thats way it's good to run the blend test because it tests big chunks of your memory, and will find some problems if there are some. You can have one stupid little error like I did, but in the end murphy will get you, so I fixed it.
January 20, 2008 3:14:20 PM

Thats a nice guide, just one question though. How did you know that default ddr voltage is 1.8?
January 20, 2008 4:00:57 PM

Its Jedec standard.....its like that for all motherboards with DDR2
January 20, 2008 4:04:35 PM

mikecdm said:
Thats a nice guide, just one question though. How did you know that default ddr voltage is 1.8?


Yea... What Silverion said, JEDEC DDR3 is 1.5v
January 20, 2008 5:05:11 PM

Silverion77 said:
Its Jedec standard.....its like that for all motherboards with DDR2


Thats pretty much explains it. So if my ram is rated at 2.1v I should have the setting to +.3? I'd also like to ask if it helps with stability to set it higher? I had initially set the memory timings to 4-4-4-12, which my ram is rated at, but I didn't know what the default voltage on the board was so I didn't make any changes. Once I started o/c, I relaxed to the timings to 5-5-5-15, but haven't changed them back. Would raising the voltage to 2.1 and lowering the timings again be better? I'd assume so, but this is my first time o/c'ing.

January 20, 2008 5:13:18 PM

Set the voltage to 2.1v and then change it depending on your overclock. Yes more voltage will make it more stable (like a Cpu) but u dont want to overvolt it by adding too much
January 20, 2008 5:14:38 PM

If you do add too much voltage, the ram would be unstable.

Tighter timings require more voltage too.
a b K Overclocking
January 20, 2008 9:19:52 PM

^Agreed.
January 21, 2008 4:08:04 AM

Me? Waste electricity? Damn, my secret's out.

The reason I run it the entire weekend is usually because I can't be bothered to test it for longer than about 30 minutes during the week, whereas over a weekend I'm usually involved in playing various forms of paintball and/or hiking up a mountain and/or socialising and/or getting shagged to smithereens (lately) and/or partying and am thus not in the immediate vicinity of my PC.

Hey - it works for me...
January 29, 2008 2:31:24 PM

Great guide, especially for an OC noob like me.
January 29, 2008 8:40:27 PM

Did you ever change the purple writing?
a b K Overclocking
January 29, 2008 8:55:17 PM

^No, I haven't gotten the time to edit the pic. My camera rechargeable are dead and I need new ones. :( .
January 30, 2008 9:56:13 PM

Thanks for the link shadow, when i get my PC i will refer back to this guide to OC it.
a b K Overclocking
January 30, 2008 11:51:56 PM

^Glad I could help ;) 
a b K Overclocking
February 29, 2008 1:54:36 AM

Hey guys, I will be updating this thread during this weekend to better explain the BIOS options and to include the options for DS3R,etc. since the options are very smiler (in OCing at least)
February 29, 2008 12:52:00 PM

Cool. I've been playing with my brand new DS3L and I have to say I'm very impressed with the board. I have my e6750 at 3.2GHz undervolted to 1.3V and I still lowering. I think I got a really good e6750 :bounce: 

Are you planning on going into the Ctrl+F1 settings? There's some good stuff in there like timings and MCH read delay (tRD). I know the "Performance Enhance" setting adjusts the tRD, but going from "Standard" to "Turbo" drops it from 11 to 6, which is too low for a 400MHz FSB to be stable.

I've got most of the setting figured out and I'd be glad to help.
a b K Overclocking
March 1, 2008 10:22:38 PM

^I am not planing on going in to RAM timing and RAM over clocking in general. This is meant to be for CPU OCing only. I would be glad if you could post the explanations here or on another topic and link it here.
March 1, 2008 10:35:55 PM

It's best to keep things consolidated so when I get the time I'll post my findings with regards to memory timings and MCH delay here. Needless to say those settings can make a BIG difference, both for stability and performance.

Cool thread by the way; I wish I had found this before I set my overclock up. Would've saved me a couple of hours.
a b K Overclocking
March 2, 2008 2:26:15 PM

^Thanks.
March 2, 2008 4:01:56 PM

Here's some stuff to get the ball rolling:

One of the most important and often overlooked settings is the MCH read delay (tRD). Without going into too much detail I will say that, similar to memory timings, the lower this value is the better your system will perform. However, setting this too low will compromise system stability, and if you go REALLY low your system will fail to POST.

This review from AnandTech does an excellent job explaining this critical setting. I recommend starting at page 4, but the quick and dirty can be found on page 9.

Setting tRD on the DS3L can be a bit tricky. The "Performance Enhance" setting adjusts it as follows:
Standard__tRD=11
Turbo_____tRD=6
Extreme___I have never been able to POST at this setting, so I don't know

On my system I am able to boot into Windows with Turbo, but Prime fails after ~2 seconds. Backing off to Standard will make things nice and stable, but the performance hit is noticeable. So how do we go about fine tuning the tRD on this board?

It's easy really actually. The DS3L refers to tRD as "Static tRead Value." Manually setting this will override the default "Performance Enhance" value. Weird I know, but that's it. Setting this to 8 allows my system to be completely stable at a FSB of 400MHz while yielding a nice performance boost over the default "Standard" setting of tRD=11.
March 4, 2008 4:08:45 PM

^nice find. thanks...


shadow. ur pics have being removed. u gotta do something about it.
March 4, 2008 4:59:34 PM

homerdog said:


It's easy really actually. The DS3L refers to tRD as "Static tRead Value." Manually setting this will override the default "Performance Enhance" value. Weird I know, but that's it. Setting this to 8 allows my system to be completely stable at a FSB of 400MHz while yielding a nice performance boost over the default "Standard" setting of tRD=11.


Yes finally! I googled this and couldn't find how to adjust this setting on my DS3L. I've read a review pertaining to a certain make of ram where as changing this setting to a lower timing increased a benchmarks FPS by a decent amount, being ~3FPS or so. I believe it was a real world run through and not something synthetic as well. I myself will now play with this and see what results I can come up with. Thanks.
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2008 9:59:31 PM

night_wolf_in said:
^nice find. thanks...


shadow. ur pics have being removed. u gotta do something about it.

Yeah, looks like it. Got to update the pics.

Updated the pics on 3/4/2008. Along with new helpful information posted by homerdog
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2008 10:15:15 PM

One more question for you guys:

What colors do you guys want the text in the pics to be (ones for the BIOS settings) to be?
March 4, 2008 10:56:34 PM

:hello:  The green is OK, but the purple is kind of difficult to read against the blue background.
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2008 11:01:00 PM

Cool, Thanks will change it when i get the time.
March 5, 2008 1:26:10 AM

bildo123 said:
Yes finally! I googled this and couldn't find how to adjust this setting on my DS3L. I've read a review pertaining to a certain make of ram where as changing this setting to a lower timing increased a benchmarks FPS by a decent amount, being ~3FPS or so. I believe it was a real world run through and not something synthetic as well. I myself will now play with this and see what results I can come up with. Thanks.


What a minute though, let me get this straight as there was no Static tRead Value on my DS3L. I changed a sub memory timing named Refresh to ACT delay, is that it? I changed it to 8 and everything seems to be stable....
March 5, 2008 1:45:42 AM

No, that's not it.

Did you press Ctrl+F1 at the main BIOS screen? You can't change a lot of settings unless you do that. Don't ask me why :??: 
March 5, 2008 10:31:51 AM

Ya I did, it's the only way t show the hidden memory sub-timings....lol then what the heck did I set to '8'....system hasn't acted funny though...As a matter of fact I have an old picture of me messing around and I have all the memory timings in this screenshot. This doesnt reflect anything I have set right now but if you could just point to the one that would be good enough


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