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Power supply issues, need help.

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October 17, 2007 6:10:04 PM

I recently assembled a new computer but I've run into some power issues. The first time I turned it on I saw the ASUS

bios screen for a few seconds before it died. Now nothing happens at all when I turn it on. Is my power supply dead?

This is the power supply:

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/ite...

The specs say it should work with 230V input so I'm not sure where I went wrong.

More about : power supply issues

a b B Homebuilt system
October 17, 2007 6:30:17 PM

Go over your connections.
Have you connected the right end of the cable to your PCI-Express card? Did you have to force it in?
Do you have any shorts, like too many spacer screws below the motherboard.
October 17, 2007 9:44:53 PM

I've gone over the connections and everything seems to be fine. This is my first time assembling a computer however, so it's possible that I'm missing something obvious.

I had no trouble connecting the graphics card. I removed it altogether just to see if that made a difference, but the results are the same.

I'm not sure exactly what you mean by too many spacer screws touching the motherboard. If you mean are there any spacers touching the motherboard where they shouldn't be, then no.


Thanks for the reply :) 

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a b B Homebuilt system
a b ) Power supply
October 17, 2007 10:58:38 PM

Is there a switch on the back for 115/230v? If so, is it switched to the 230v setting?
October 17, 2007 11:08:51 PM

No, there isn't a switch on it.
October 17, 2007 11:35:54 PM

Most new PSUs are autoswitching so you don't typically need to worry about that anymore. Do you have a spare PSU you could hook up to see if it is your PSU? Is your psu plugged into a powerstrip? If so, you may want to check to make sure the circuit breaker didn't trip for some reason. Could be a short somewhere in your setup.
Just thought of something else. We need to see all of your system specs. Wonder if there could be voltage compatibility issues you are not aware of. Memory comes to mind... :/ 
Example would be if your memory requires a certain voltage your mobo does not provide by default...
October 17, 2007 11:59:48 PM

ailgatrat said:
Most new PSUs are autoswitching so you don't typically need to worry about that anymore. Do you have a spare PSU you could hook up to see if it is your PSU? Is your psu plugged into a powerstrip? If so, you may want to check to make sure the circuit breaker didn't trip for some reason. Could be a short somewhere in your setup.
Just thought of something else. We need to see all of your system specs. Wonder if there could be voltage compatibility issues you are not aware of. Memory comes to mind... :/ 
Example would be if your memory requires a certain voltage your mobo does not provide by default...


I don't have a spare PSU, but I don't mind buying a new one if I can be sure thats where the problem is.

I've checked the powerstrip and tried using the power cord from this PC to no avail.

Here is a list of the components:
Intel Quad Core Kentsfield 2.4Ghz Q6600 CPU (CP2-DUO-Q6600 )

WD Caviar 500GB Serial ATA HD 7200/16MB/SATA-3G (TSD-500AAKS TSR )

Asus P5N-E SLI Socket 775 Motherboard (A455-2322 )

EVGA GeForce 8800 GTS Superclocked 320MB PCIe (E145-8014 )

OCZ 2048MB PC6400 DDR2 800MHz (2x1024MB) (O261-7054 )

OCZ 600W Stealth Xtreme Power Supply

I removed one of the memory sticks and tried different slots too.

Thanks for the help so far, appreciate it :) 
October 18, 2007 11:56:54 AM

ailgatrat said:
Do you have a spare PSU you could hook up to see if it is your PSU?


I just tried a working 250w power supply and it still won't start.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 18, 2007 12:06:49 PM

Sorry I meant standoffs. For every standoff you have under the motherboard there should be a screw on the motherboard.
If you have any extra it will cause shorts. PSU may bwe protecting itself by not starting.
October 18, 2007 12:42:26 PM

At the moment I have the motherboard, cpu, memory, hard drive and power supply all connected outside of the case. Still doesn't work :( 

October 18, 2007 12:57:54 PM

connected CPU fan from PS to motherboard?
October 18, 2007 1:17:20 PM

There is a separate CPU power connector that needs plugged in, is it in?
October 18, 2007 1:31:15 PM

By dead I understand that not even the fans are turning including the CPU fan. I would unplug and replug the power cables going directly to the motherboard, just to make sure they are seated properly. Then, I would check the cables that connect to the power switch, reset switch, etc., just to make sure they are not plugged in backwards.
As a last resort, you could try removing all peripherals like the memory, gfx card, hard drives, etc., and see if you get anything to power up on the board.
Could just be a DOA motherboard, unfortunately.


Edit: I just glanced at the Tiger Direct page that has your motherboard on it and some of the comments on there weren't so good. Lot's of RMA's with that Board. I'm thinking the Board may be bad after all...
October 18, 2007 2:44:28 PM

ever17 said:
connected CPU fan from PS to motherboard?


I don't have a fan specifically for the CPU.

Jim_L9 said:
There is a separate CPU power connector that needs plugged in, is it in?


Yeah that's plugged in.

ailgatrat said:
By dead I understand that not even the fans are turning including the CPU fan. I would unplug and replug the power cables going directly to the motherboard, just to make sure they are seated properly. Then, I would check the cables that connect to the power switch, reset switch, etc., just to make sure they are not plugged in backwards.
As a last resort, you could try removing all peripherals like the memory, gfx card, hard drives, etc., and see if you get anything to power up on the board.
Could just be a DOA motherboard, unfortunately.


Edit: I just glanced at the Tiger Direct page that has your motherboard on it and some of the comments on there weren't so good. Lot's of RMA's with that Board. I'm thinking the Board may be bad after all...


Yeah, the fans weren't turning at all. The green led on the motherboard lights up, and the power cable is definitely in right.

I did get to the BIOS screen initially. Would that rule out the motherboard being DOA or not?

Again, thanks for the replies :) 
a c 122 B Homebuilt system
a c 144 ) Power supply
October 18, 2007 4:35:22 PM

I have seen quite a few "new build failure" threads here. The following is one of my replies that I have cleaned up and expanded. This assumes that the new build is completely dead. Even if not, the same principles still apply.

I have long been a proponent of breadboarding (See Step 6.) a new build. That enables me to test all of the parts before I install them inside the case.
________________________________________________________________________

This is a general purpose reply. Comments applying to my eVGA 122-CK-NF68 motherboard are in italics.


Assuming the speaker is properly connected (or built in) to the motherboard, no beep means the POST did not start. A video card or memory problem that does not affect the PSU will still generate a beep pattern indicating video or memory problems. (eVGA 680i board has builtin piezo beeper - doesn't need speaker.)

You should become familiar with the POST codes. Your motherboard manual may list them. If not, google something like "<motherboard model number> POST codes".

Turn off the computer with the switch on the back of the PSU or unplug it. I prefer to use the switch if present. That way, everything is still grounded through the power cord. Wait a few minutes. While you are waiting, double check all the cable connections. Make sure that the case switches and LED's are connected correctly. Pay close attention to the main power and 4/8 pin 12 volt connectors to the motherboard. If the computer is completely dead, the case power switch may be bad. Swap it with the reset switch to test. Turn on the computer. If it still doesn't work, you have to resort to serious troubleshooting. (680i motherboard has builtin POWER and RESET switches. I use those for testing or troubleshooting.

If so, six possibilities:

1. The motherboard is improperly installed in the case, shorting something out. This happens surprisingly often. Verify that the metal standoffs in the case exactly match the motherboard mounting holes.

2. Bad or inadequate PSU. A working PSU will send a control signal called "PSGood" or something similar to the motherboard. eVGA calls it "PWROK". According to the 680i mobo manual (pg.18), you can find it on pin 8 of the 24 pin power connector. It should go to 5 volts dc when you turn on the PSU. The motherboard needs this signal before the CPU can start the boot process. A problem with any output should kill the PSGood signal. Losing the PSGood signal forces a CPU reset. PC's with modern components NEED a good stable PSU. The forums here contain guides on how to select (by brand and capacity) a good PSU. And even a reputable PSU may be DOA or have other internal problems. All of the outputs can be present, but nothing will happen without PSGood. The CPU will stay reset.

3. A bad drive or video card affecting the PSU.

4. Bad memory.

5. Bad CPU.

6. Bad motherboard.

CAUTION - you need to remove power (ON-OFF switch on back of PSU or unplug it) from the computer each time you install or remove anything. I know this sounds stupid, but you'd be surprised ...

Disassemble everything. Breadboard (assemble the components outside the case on an insulated surface) only the PSU, motherboard and speaker, and CPU and HSF. Doublecheck HSF installation, especially on an LGA775 board if using the Intel-style push pin mounting scheme. If the problem was in the CPU socketing, reinstalling the CPU should solve it. Plug in the main power connector and the 4 or 8 pin EPS connector into the motherboard. Now you need a way to turn on the computer. I use wiring, switches, and LED's scavenged from an old case. Turn on the computer. If the fans start spinning, you at least have some 12 volt power. Look for any motherboard LED's. If you hear beeps, the computer at least started POSTing and the PSU, motherboard, and CPU are probably good. No beeps means that at least one of the three are bad. At that point, all you can do is test the parts by substitution. I say "probably good" here because an inadequate PSU could pass this test and fail later when it's more heavily loaded.

A working motherboard with only power connected and the CPU and HSF installed will complete the POST with a failure beep pattern.

Beeps now should indicate memory problems. (With no memory installed, an eVGA 680i mobo will generate a series of long single beeps.) Install the memory. No beeps probably means that you have a shorted memory chip. Dual channel motherboards can operate with only a single memory module installed. Install each one separately and test. Sometimes motherboards do not properly set the memory operating voltage. That is a more complex problem than the simple "It won't start" problem. ("Simple" is not the same as "easy".) For one thing, if the computer does not start and complete the POST you cannot get into the BIOS to adjust the memory voltage.

With the memory installed, if you hear beeps, that should indicate that the POST detected video problems. (With no video card installed, a 680i will generate a series of one long and three short beeps.) Install the video card, plug in any necessary aux power cables, and plug in the monitor. Turn on the computer. No beeps now means that the video card is shorting out the PSU. Otherwise, at this point you should see something on the monitor if the video card is good.

At this point, if there are no problems, a 680i mobo will successfully POST (a single short beep) and the LED display will show "7F". The monitor will indicate a boot failure.

Turn off the PSU and plug in a keyboard and mouse. Turn on the computer. Try to enter the BIOS to set date and time and verify the amount of memory present. If you can do this, it means that all the expensive parts are probably good.

Start plugging in the rest of the components one at a time and test. No beep, and you have found the problem.

If everything works, it probably means that something was improperly installed in the case. Reassemble in the case and test, following the steps above. If you are lucky, everything works.

I always breadboard a new build. I pretty much reserve the fourth port of my KVM switch for system testing.
!