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a microATX gaming rig?

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Last response: in Systems
October 18, 2007 7:13:44 PM

Would it be possible to build are great gaming PC using a microATX mobo? Something that could play crysis on high settings? If so what mb would i need to do it with? Thanks for the help!

More about : microatx gaming rig

a b B Homebuilt system
a b 4 Gaming
October 18, 2007 7:42:23 PM

Most, if not all, ATX motherboards have microATX cousins. They support all the same CPUs as the ATX boards, but have some limiting options like limited or no overclocking features and fewer add-on card options (single PCI-Ex16 slot). Other differences may include fewer SATA connectors or DIMM slots. None of which prevents you from building a killer gaming system.

-Wolf sends

Edit - Just an example:
Gigabyte G31MX
a b 4 Gaming
October 18, 2007 8:03:09 PM

The micro-atx WILL kill the hi-end gaming system. You're talking about an extremely SMALL case with ALOT of hi heat devices with NO way to get rid of it. That's why you don't see "gaming" micro-atx computers.
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October 18, 2007 8:18:04 PM

are there any good microATX boards for overclocking?
October 18, 2007 8:29:55 PM

Alright thanks the info. I kinda figured that, but i thought it would be kinda cool. Anyways case size doesn't matter because i am building my own.
October 18, 2007 9:19:18 PM

computertech82 said:
The micro-atx WILL kill the hi-end gaming system. You're talking about an extremely SMALL case with ALOT of hi heat devices with NO way to get rid of it. That's why you don't see "gaming" micro-atx computers.


That's not necessarily true- there are several microatx gaming boxes. Maybe the best known is the Falcon Northwest Fragbox with 4 DIMM slots, Core 2 Duo on a 965 chipset, PCI-E x16, and a 750W Silverstone PSU. Does it get hot? probably but it's probably engineered to get rid of as much heat as possible.
October 18, 2007 9:27:57 PM

computertech82 said:
The micro-atx WILL kill the hi-end gaming system. You're talking about an extremely SMALL case with ALOT of hi heat devices with NO way to get rid of it. That's why you don't see "gaming" micro-atx computers.


I'm sorry, but my last build WAS a m-ATX GAMING RIG; Thermaltake Lanbox case with 2Gb RAM, 2 HDDs in RAID, XFX 7950GT, Athlon X2 4400+ Brisbane, Creative X-Fi Fatal1ty Sound Card, and TT 750W PSU. Granted, with a slot cooler under the card and another above, the system runs well.
October 18, 2007 10:08:05 PM

Aye, I would never build a micro-atx system for 2 very plausible reasons:

1) too small a case to work on, difficulty in swapping components in tight spaces, etc.

2) more likely to have overheating problems, fewer fans, less ventilation w/ heat trapped in undesirable locations.

With the new system I'm building I like the design of the Silverstone TJ09-B case I ordered. The PS is situated on the bottom away from the CPU and RAM which can generate considerable heat within a case. Considering that heat rises, the dual 120mm fans ontop of the case should be very effective at removing heat from the case.
October 18, 2007 10:36:01 PM

Quote:
Alright thanks the info. I kinda figured that, but i thought it would be kinda cool. Anyways case size doesn't matter because i am building my own.


If case size is not a problem, why both with a small one for a gamming rig? Get a nice sized case with great airflow and be happy. Antec 900, 180series. Lian Li A70, A10. thermaltake Armour. Coolermaster Stacker series.
a b 4 Gaming
October 18, 2007 11:03:17 PM

PCKid777 said:
I'm sorry, but my last build WAS a m-ATX GAMING RIG; Thermaltake Lanbox case with 2Gb RAM, 2 HDDs in RAID, XFX 7950GT, Athlon X2 4400+ Brisbane, Creative X-Fi Fatal1ty Sound Card, and TT 750W PSU. Granted, with a slot cooler under the card and another above, the system runs well.


The "lan" boxes i really wouldn't call a micro-atx. (typical matx):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A "special" box just for the purpose (redesigned just for cooling) can help. But it's not really a typical m-atx case even if it only supports micro-atx motherboards:
http://www.thermaltake.com/product/Chassis/miniCase/lan...
It will produce ALOT of noise with the smal fans. Cases with 120mm fans are better (and more quiet). How much noise do you want (or don't want).
October 19, 2007 1:13:29 AM

computertech82 said:
The "lan" boxes i really wouldn't call a micro-atx. (typical matx):
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A "special" box just for the purpose (redesigned just for cooling) can help. But it's not really a typical m-atx case even if it only supports micro-atx motherboards:
http://www.thermaltake.com/product/Chassis/miniCase/lan...
It will produce ALOT of noise with the smal fans. Cases with 120mm fans are better (and more quiet). How much noise do you want (or don't want).


Strike two: WRONG AGAIN. The fans are just as quiet as the 120mm case fans on my TT Tsunami case. In fact, they are just as quiet as the TT MaxOrb at 1700RPM (mind you, that's a 110mm open frame fan and yes, it's installed in that case).

In regards to the OP; short answer: YES. However, the only reason to build a m-ATX is for portability or a smaller footprint. But ya, m-ATX builds can be just as powerful - minus the lack of SLi/Crossfire support for the newer generation of m-ATX boards.
a b 4 Gaming
October 19, 2007 1:50:56 AM

PCKid777 said:
Strike two: WRONG AGAIN. The fans are just as quiet as the 120mm case fans on my TT Tsunami case. In fact, they are just as quiet as the TT MaxOrb at 1700RPM (mind you, that's a 110mm open frame fan and yes, it's installed in that case).

In regards to the OP; short answer: YES. However, the only reason to build a m-ATX is for portability or a smaller footprint. But ya, m-ATX builds can be just as powerful - minus the lack of SLi/Crossfire support for the newer generation of m-ATX boards.


Acually you prove your self wrong (and looking stupid). Everyone one knows 60mm fans (about 20cfm) are far LOUDER then any 120mm (60cfm). Give up while you're FAR behind. Wow, what a dumb comment. Learn about fans:
http://www.thermaltake.com/product/DCfan/DCfan_index.as...
And it has NOTHING to do with powerful, it has EVERYTHING to do about heat. The re-arranged mini-Lan cases can help, there are also models with bigger quieter fans, but still is limited to how much air it can push.
And with monitors reaching much higher resolutions it's better to have a sli or crossfire option open. Some games are too much for a single card at high resolutions.
a c 334 4 Gaming
October 19, 2007 2:06:23 AM

If you are thinking about sticking an 8800GTX in a mATX case then you should probably stop right now. The 8800GTX will probably be too big to fit.
a c 334 4 Gaming
October 19, 2007 2:14:17 AM

Forget what I said before.

Apparently the Thermaltake VF1000BWS is capable of fitting a 8800GTX if the hard drive cage is removed. At least that what a few users say.

Thermaltake VF1000BWS
October 19, 2007 2:16:48 AM

I think everyone is forgetting about the Mac Mini. That's a pretty sweet gaming rig! *snicker*
October 19, 2007 2:43:16 AM

Just in case someone else reads this and is confused, I'd like to clarify the matter of fan sizes and noises. As one of the previous posters has stated, and as the overwhelming majority of the posters here will confirm, smaller fans are louder for a given amount of airflow. Someone may have a loud large fan and a quiet small fan, but that's going to occur because the loud fan is older or just imperfectly manufactured (or just cheap), or because it's a normal large fan compared to a high quality small fan. As a former technician with over a decade of experience, I have seen it over and over again - larger fans, all things being equal, tend to push more air and, at the same time, produce less noise than smaller fans.
In the end, though, good design trumps everything else. A small fan placed well can be quieter and more effective than a large fan in a less optimal position
October 19, 2007 2:52:41 AM

I just wanted to build a microATX gaming rig cause it would be small, easier to bring to parties, and i just like things that are small. I see now that it makes no sense and ill just stick to getting my normal sized stuff for my waterfall cooled pc.
October 19, 2007 2:53:18 AM

computertech82 said:
Acually you prove your self wrong (and looking stupid). Everyone one knows 60mm fans (about 20cfm) are far LOUDER then any 120mm (60cfm). Give up while you're FAR behind. Wow, what a dumb comment. Learn about fans:
http://www.thermaltake.com/product/DCfan/DCfan_index.as...
And it has NOTHING to do with powerful, it has EVERYTHING to do about heat. The re-arranged mini-Lan cases can help, there are also models with bigger quieter fans, but still is limited to how much air it can push.
And with monitors reaching much higher resolutions it's better to have a sli or crossfire option open. Some games are too much for a single card at high resolutions.


Strike Three: YOU'RE OUT! Wow, what a pathetic remark.... Learn how to use google:

http://www.virtual-hideout.net/reviews/Thermaltake_LANB...

And oh ya, learn how to use TT's and Newegg's website if you're gonna compare fans: The link you provided to a similar Lanbox reports that the fans spin at ~ 1800RPMs. Even the Vantec fan found at http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811999615 spins between 1900~4200RPMs, and it's reported to be quiet at low speed. So actually, you indirectly proved yourself wrong.

And oh ya, I forgot: YOU DON'T OWN THE CASE!

And oh ya, (last point), EVERYONE KNOWS THAT FANS DON'T ALL SPIN AT THE SAME SPEED!
October 19, 2007 3:09:00 AM

MattC said:
Just in case someone else reads this and is confused, I'd like to clarify the matter of fan sizes and noises. As one of the previous posters has stated, and as the overwhelming majority of the posters here will confirm, smaller fans are louder for a given amount of airflow. Someone may have a loud large fan and a quiet small fan, but that's going to occur because the loud fan is older or just imperfectly manufactured (or just cheap), or because it's a normal large fan compared to a high quality small fan. As a former technician with over a decade of experience, I have seen it over and over again - larger fans, all things being equal, tend to push more air and, at the same time, produce less noise than smaller fans.
In the end, though, good design trumps everything else. A small fan placed well can be quieter and more effective than a large fan in a less optimal position


In regards to your message, I agree 100%. What I think was omitted earlier was the fact that fans all spin at different speeds, which leads to different noise levels. Also, the way the fan is built can also affect noise (i.e. the bearings). Heck, resonance or vibration...
October 19, 2007 3:32:00 PM

Keep in mind though, when you build it, the smaller the case, the harder to work on. Like for example, I'm just upgrading from an Athlon XP with a full ATX board, didn't have a lot of $$ to play with, so I'm going to micro atx board, b/c it was a little better priced. Keep it cool and it'll be fine, heat is what will kill. But bigger is better too. You find that out when you are trying to plug in a cable on the corner of your board and wires are all in your way.
October 19, 2007 5:27:56 PM

i think i am just going to stick to my ATX board, and finish up my mod project.
December 27, 2008 5:23:39 PM

The original question was whether a MicroAtx motherboard would be capable of handling a gaming hardware and that was answered YES. Now all the argument seems to be over fitting a gaming computer into a MicroAtx case. Why use a MicroAtx case, all Atx cases support MicroAtx motherboards anyway!
December 28, 2008 5:15:29 AM

yeah but some people want as smal a computer as possible. laptop maybe fools? lanbox?
December 28, 2008 11:44:35 AM

-Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1
-Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 Kentsfield 2.4GHz
-ECS G43T-M LGA 775 Intel G43 HDMI Micro ATX
-G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel
-Rosewill RP600V2-S-SL 600W ATX12V v2.01 SLI Ready
-ZALMAN CNPS7000B-AlCu
-HITACHI Deskstar 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache
-SAMSUNG Black 22X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 16X W/ Lightscribe
-MSI N9800GT 512M OC GeForce 9800 GT 512MB 256-bit GDDR3 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported
-APEVIA X-QPACK2-BK Case

This is my MICRO gaming rig. Its weird cause i currently have the cover off so its all exposed right now. and it get the same cooling temps and if it had the cover on.

Im just having trouble using all 4 dimm slots right now :( 
December 29, 2008 6:46:35 AM

The M3A78-CM by Asus is great! Its micro atx, and it is awesome with overclocking!!It even has this special feature, that if the computer fails due to OC'ing it will reset the settings automatically instead of resetting the jumpers. its great. It also has the 780 AMD chipset for high data transport, for overclocking
January 17, 2009 12:15:44 AM

I've been thinking about going this route as well.

I had been looking at the recent system builder $1250 PC and wondered how I might be able to squeeze some of those components into a smaller package. I definitely don't want to skimp on the GPU (4830 or 4850 with 1GIG), and 2-4Gb system ram. I already have a WD Raptor 300Gb drive...

I just wasn't sure whether or not Micro or Mini ATX was the way to go and still be able to OC stuff...