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high-def, low-emission tv?

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Anonymous
April 27, 2005 8:17:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dear folks:

My sister is very sensitive to electrical imput...loud noises, auditory
buzzes (like in some department stores, etc.), high voltage wires,
etc.. I would like
to help get her a high-definition tv but I don't know if they make any
with relatively low emissions. I am trying to do some research on this,
thus my question to you.

Do you know of any tv manufacturers who might make low-emission,
high-definition tvs? She has an old 19" analog tv set now (about 20
years old). I don't even know how standard high-def tv's compare with
these older analog tv sets regarding emissions. Do you know anywhere I
might do some searches on the internet for my research on this? Also, I
am not versed in electronics or electronic lingo, so the simpler the
explanations, the better for me!

thanks--!
Craig

More about : high def low emission

Anonymous
April 28, 2005 12:22:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<csmith@cts.com> wrote in message
news:1114643875.308215.204300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Dear folks:
>
> My sister is very sensitive to electrical imput...loud noises, auditory
> buzzes (like in some department stores, etc.), high voltage wires,
> etc.. I would like
> to help get her a high-definition tv but I don't know if they make any
> with relatively low emissions. I am trying to do some research on this,
> thus my question to you.
>
> Do you know of any tv manufacturers who might make low-emission,
> high-definition tvs? She has an old 19" analog tv set now (about 20
> years old). I don't even know how standard high-def tv's compare with
> these older analog tv sets regarding emissions. Do you know anywhere I
> might do some searches on the internet for my research on this? Also, I
> am not versed in electronics or electronic lingo, so the simpler the
> explanations, the better for me!
>
> thanks--!
> Craig

What KIND of emissions? I suspect it is high pitched sound alone.

The sound that probably drives your sister nuts is the 17.5KHz Horizontal
sweep of a standard CRT.

When I was younger, I had extraordinary high frequency hearing and some TV's
were difficult to be around. Ultrasonic alarms were so loud as to be
physically very painful. Fortunately, I can no longer hear much above16KHz,
so TV's have gotten much quieter.

BUT... most HD sets don't have CRT's or even high voltages anymore.

Rear projection CRT sets have the same stuff that regular TV's have, only
operating at higher frequencies that she may or may not be able to hear. Can
she hear CRT computer monitors? If not, the RP CRT is potentially ok. And
certainly the most HDTV for the dollar.

LCD and TI DLP engine based RP sets don't have CRT's but do have a high
frequency plasma arc metal halide lamp / power supply that she may find
discomforting - she should try and see - if ok, this is your best choice.

LCD panels use fluorescent lights, these have an inverter and might be
audible, probably not. LCD flat panels tend to be small for the money.

Plasma panels operate their electronics in the tens of KHz, it's highly
unlikely that she can hear them. The cheap ones typically look lousy with
dark scenes and may have low (less than HD) resolution called "ED".
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 1:35:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Also, most run their horizontal frequency about 31k now not the 15.735 for
NTSC. May still get a bit of yoke buzz for the vertical deflection tho but
that will be a low frequency buzz not the squeal.
"Randy Sweeney" <rsweeney1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:uNydnby9BtUtse3fRVn-rA@comcast.com...
>
> <csmith@cts.com> wrote in message
> news:1114643875.308215.204300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>> Dear folks:
>>
>> My sister is very sensitive to electrical imput...loud noises, auditory
>> buzzes (like in some department stores, etc.), high voltage wires,
>> etc.. I would like
>> to help get her a high-definition tv but I don't know if they make any
>> with relatively low emissions. I am trying to do some research on this,
>> thus my question to you.
>>
>> Do you know of any tv manufacturers who might make low-emission,
>> high-definition tvs? She has an old 19" analog tv set now (about 20
>> years old). I don't even know how standard high-def tv's compare with
>> these older analog tv sets regarding emissions. Do you know anywhere I
>> might do some searches on the internet for my research on this? Also, I
>> am not versed in electronics or electronic lingo, so the simpler the
>> explanations, the better for me!
>>
>> thanks--!
>> Craig
>
> What KIND of emissions? I suspect it is high pitched sound alone.
>
> The sound that probably drives your sister nuts is the 17.5KHz Horizontal
> sweep of a standard CRT.
>
> When I was younger, I had extraordinary high frequency hearing and some
> TV's were difficult to be around. Ultrasonic alarms were so loud as to be
> physically very painful. Fortunately, I can no longer hear much
> above16KHz, so TV's have gotten much quieter.
>
> BUT... most HD sets don't have CRT's or even high voltages anymore.
>
> Rear projection CRT sets have the same stuff that regular TV's have, only
> operating at higher frequencies that she may or may not be able to hear.
> Can she hear CRT computer monitors? If not, the RP CRT is potentially ok.
> And certainly the most HDTV for the dollar.
>
> LCD and TI DLP engine based RP sets don't have CRT's but do have a high
> frequency plasma arc metal halide lamp / power supply that she may find
> discomforting - she should try and see - if ok, this is your best choice.
>
> LCD panels use fluorescent lights, these have an inverter and might be
> audible, probably not. LCD flat panels tend to be small for the money.
>
> Plasma panels operate their electronics in the tens of KHz, it's highly
> unlikely that she can hear them. The cheap ones typically look lousy with
> dark scenes and may have low (less than HD) resolution called "ED".
>
Related resources
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 3:12:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Art" <plotsligt@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:WZSdnV_UGuxSoO3fRVn-1A@comcast.com...
> Also, most run their horizontal frequency about 31k now not the 15.735 for
> NTSC. May still get a bit of yoke buzz for the vertical deflection tho but
> that will be a low frequency buzz not the squeal.

yep... my HDTV is always quiet, but I can still sense that an analog TV is
on

apparently my high freq roll off is still allowing at least my subconscious
mind to hear the horizontal sweep singing - but it's MUCH better than
listening to that annoying whistle I heard until I was around 30.
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 9:41:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My guess is that over the last 20 years, TVs have lowered emissions GREATLY.
Technology has gotten so much more advanced and more rules in place
pertaining to emissions. It will be tough to find the right set without
watching each one in a quiet room.

Good luck
--Dan

<csmith@cts.com> wrote in message
news:1114643875.308215.204300@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Dear folks:
>
> My sister is very sensitive to electrical imput...loud noises, auditory
> buzzes (like in some department stores, etc.), high voltage wires,
> etc.. I would like
> to help get her a high-definition tv but I don't know if they make any
> with relatively low emissions. I am trying to do some research on this,
> thus my question to you.
>
> Do you know of any tv manufacturers who might make low-emission,
> high-definition tvs? She has an old 19" analog tv set now (about 20
> years old). I don't even know how standard high-def tv's compare with
> these older analog tv sets regarding emissions. Do you know anywhere I
> might do some searches on the internet for my research on this? Also, I
> am not versed in electronics or electronic lingo, so the simpler the
> explanations, the better for me!
>
> thanks--!
> Craig
>
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 7:04:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

there's still a lot of EMI stuff in the electromagnetic spectrum. the lower
frequencies here, might be more distuptive... 200Hz is used in the Electric
Chair, for example because it is so much more deadly. Not as a sound, but as
an electrical current.

high levels of photins can also interact unpleasantly with the human body.
Although sunlight is a million times worse than most TV sets.

My 32 inch sanyo makes a brief 60 cycle buzz at turn-on time, which is the
degaussing coil.

15,750 drove me nits as a kid, too.

zeke


"Randy Sweeney" <rsweeney1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:UPednS0toLQAye3fRVn-ug@comcast.com...
>
> "Art" <plotsligt@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:WZSdnV_UGuxSoO3fRVn-1A@comcast.com...
>> Also, most run their horizontal frequency about 31k now not the 15.735
>> for NTSC. May still get a bit of yoke buzz for the vertical deflection
>> tho but that will be a low frequency buzz not the squeal.
>
> yep... my HDTV is always quiet, but I can still sense that an analog TV is
> on
>
> apparently my high freq roll off is still allowing at least my
> subconscious mind to hear the horizontal sweep singing - but it's MUCH
> better than listening to that annoying whistle I heard until I was around
> 30.
>
Anonymous
April 29, 2005 11:34:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"ZEKE, of the NERDS" <nerds@1-US.com> wrote in message
news:Gbyce.292$DC2.119@okepread01...
> there's still a lot of EMI stuff in the electromagnetic spectrum. the
> lower frequencies here, might be more distuptive... 200Hz is used in the
> Electric Chair, for example because it is so much more deadly. Not as a
> sound, but as an electrical current.
>
> high levels of photins can also interact unpleasantly with the human body.
> Although sunlight is a million times worse than most TV sets.
>
> My 32 inch sanyo makes a brief 60 cycle buzz at turn-on time, which is
> the degaussing coil.
>
> 15,750 drove me nits as a kid, too.
>
> zeke

could be worse, a friend of my wife was in a car accident that left her with
a peculiar brain injury

She no longer has persistence of vision - she can see the 24 fps blinking of
movies, see the dot on CRT's being scanned, see the flashing of fluorescent
lamps (even ones in laptop PC's)

and all of these things can drive her into a seizure

a serious problem - especially since her job required he to use a PC

she had to get a special LCD panel made with an incandescent backlight
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 7:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks to all of you who have responded. It sounds like the
high-definition sets are more likely to have less electro-magnetic
emissions than the standard analogue tv's, which is encouraging...

Do any of you have any recommendations on electronic companies-- online
or brick and mortar-- which might be more informed about lower
emissions? Or any place on the web I might get more info on this?
thanks again,
Craig
Anonymous
May 1, 2005 11:23:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

<csmith@cts.com> wrote in message
news:1114988257.579313.278350@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Thanks to all of you who have responded. It sounds like the
> high-definition sets are more likely to have less electro-magnetic
> emissions than the standard analogue tv's, which is encouraging...
>
> Do any of you have any recommendations on electronic companies-- online
> or brick and mortar-- which might be more informed about lower
> emissions? Or any place on the web I might get more info on this?
> thanks again,
> Craig

I think you have this "emissions" thing out of proportion.

ALL TV's and indeed all electronic devices have limited electromagnetic
emission, all in the FCC Part 15 regulations to prevent interference.

All the posters here were speaking of sound emissions.

Humans really don't sense weak electro-magnetic fields.
May 6, 2005 4:44:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 1 May 2005 19:23:24 -0400, "Randy Sweeney"
<rsweeney1@comcast.net> wrote:

>
><csmith@cts.com> wrote in message
>news:1114988257.579313.278350@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> Thanks to all of you who have responded. It sounds like the
>> high-definition sets are more likely to have less electro-magnetic
>> emissions than the standard analogue tv's, which is encouraging...
>>
>> Do any of you have any recommendations on electronic companies-- online
>> or brick and mortar-- which might be more informed about lower
>> emissions? Or any place on the web I might get more info on this?
>> thanks again,
>> Craig
>
>I think you have this "emissions" thing out of proportion.
>
>ALL TV's and indeed all electronic devices have limited electromagnetic
>emission, all in the FCC Part 15 regulations to prevent interference.
>
>All the posters here were speaking of sound emissions.
>
>Humans really don't sense weak electro-magnetic fields.
>

Then there's the Toshiba set that was transmitting an international
distress signal ;) 
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 10:18:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"gerry" <gerry_m@spam_this.com> wrote in message


>>I think you have this "emissions" thing out of proportion.
>>
>>ALL TV's and indeed all electronic devices have limited electromagnetic
>>emission, all in the FCC Part 15 regulations to prevent interference.
>>
>>All the posters here were speaking of sound emissions.
>>
>>Humans really don't sense weak electro-magnetic fields.
>>
>
> Then there's the Toshiba set that was transmitting an international
> distress signal ;) 

It obviously wanted everyone to know that it was failing
!