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Using a router to send cricket broadband to my other pc's

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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February 19, 2009 1:29:23 AM

how do i make my pc a acess point using a router to send cricket wireless to my other pc's or laptops
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
February 19, 2009 7:33:53 AM

The function of a router is to make the broadband available to all the (authorised) computers within range.

You don't have to connect one computer to the ISP and then send the service on from there.

If you presently have an ADSL service and a modem, an ADSL router/modem unit could replace existing modem.

If you have cable, a cable router would connect to the existing cable modem.
August 5, 2010 2:10:01 PM

I realize this post is over six months old, but for the web record I'll add this:

I think the original poster is trying to share a broadband 3G wireless modem from Cricket Wireless. While this modem connects to the larger internet universe via a cellular network, its only other interface is a USB plug. Cricket does not support the use of their device with a router. Most routers have no USB port. But some routers have one. Typically they are called a "mobile router" or "3G router." Be sure to router's check the list of supported modems, as I know of only one model of router reported to work for Cricket's modems. Usually routers don't care what is attached, but these modems based on cell phone technology use a less-standardized interface. They use an extension to the old Hayes AT command set via Windows "dial-up networking" interface; this is called TIA/EIA IS-707. But they also come with Cricket's proprietary dialer application. I don't yet know whether Cricket's dialer does anything proprietary, but under Windows Dial-Up Networking, it very well could. In any case, if the dialer does nothing special, then a person could replace it by doing this:

Open a terminal to Cricket's modem and send ATDT#777. This tells the modem to dial the number #777. Any router connecting through this modem would need to send this same modem command.

Here, it looks like some people with Macs have figured out how to bypass the dialer software:
http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=2008091817...

Something similar could be done on Windows. If anyone tries it and still has a question, post a reply and I'll try to help.

(I purchased a Cricket Wireless A610 modem a week ago and have been shopping for a router that can share it. I used to work in engineering at QUALCOMM under a boss who in the early 1990s wrote the protocol by which Windows talks to this modem.)
Related resources
August 5, 2010 2:22:03 PM

The original poster may also have been trying to share the connection without buying a special type of router. Under Windows this is possible using Internet Connection Sharing. The shared connection is point-to-point. It can be shared with one other device. That device could be another computer or it could be a conventional router with no USB port.

Description of Internet Connection Sharing:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/234815

Enable Internet Connection Sharing on Win XP:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126

Here are two sets of instructions someone wrote specifically for sharing a Cricket connection via Internet Connection Sharing.
http://filetonic.com/blog/2010/02/01/sharing-cricket-mo...
http://www.ehow.com/how_6504179_cricket-broadband-work-...

This could save the original poster approximately $83.99 versus buying the special "3G" or "broadband" router.
September 29, 2010 1:16:27 PM

Hello, I'm trying to figure out how to share a connection through cricket wireless broadband to two desktops.

I've tried about everything to get a connect to my second desktop. I've asked Walmart associates and they sold me the wrong router. I've asked Bestbuy Geek Squad and they trying to sell me a 100 dollar plus router. I've done the Internet searches on how to connect two PC to share a signal but can not figure it out.
I tried adding hoc, internet sharing option, and changing properties. I have a Trendnet product that came with the PC I think it's used to help get a signal because I can pick up someone elses signal or modem. I've been working at this for three days and I don't want to call it quits yet because I know it can be done. I must just be doing something wrong or missing something.
Can anyone give me some advise I would really appreciate it. The host computer is running Windows XP and is an older model so it doesn't have a ITP protical version 4 or 6 it just has a regular one will that work as well when setting up ICS. The other desktop run Windows Vista and I'm using a cricket Broadband.
I've tried asking help from stores where to associates should know but it seems they just trying to sell me stuff.
a b F Wireless
September 29, 2010 4:38:58 PM

vonney0281 said:
Hello, I've tried about everything to get a connect to my second desktop. I've asked Walmart associates and they sold me the wrong router. I've asked Bestbuy Geek Squad and they trying to sell me a 100 dollar plus router. I've done the Internet searches on how to connect two PC to share a signal but can not figure it out.
I tried adding hoc, internet sharing option, and changing properties. I have a Trendnet product that came with the PC I think it's used to help get a signal because I can pick up someone elses signal or modem. I've been working at this for three days and I don't want to call it quits yet because I know it can be done, I must just be missing something wrong or missing something.
Can anyone give me some advise I would really appreciate it. The host computer is running Windows XP and is an older model so it doesn't have a ITP protical version 4 or 6 it just has a regular one will that work as well when setting up ICS. The other desktop run Windows Vista and I'm using a cricket Broadband.
I've tried asking help from stores where to associates should know but it seems they just trying to sell me stuff.


It might have been better to start your own thread since I'm not sure how much of what has already been posted is relevant. Anyway, let’s describe the goal, then how to achieve it.

Let's say you have two computers, A and B. Computer A has a broadband connection (doesn’t really matter what type; cable, dsl, cellular (Cricket), etc., it’s all the same for the purpose of this exercise). You now want to share that broadband connection w/ computer B. To keep it simple, let's assume computer B is strictly a wired-only machine (i.e., has an ethernet port).

< -- broadband (to isp) -->[computer A](lan)<-- wire -->(lan)[computer B]

In order for this to work, computer A and computer B must minimally have an ethernet port (that's the lan to lan connection in my diagram). Computer A needs to "route" the traffic between its broadband network interface, and its local network interface (the lan to lan connection to computer B). In fact, we can legitimately say computer A needs to become a router!

But none of this happens my magic. We have to have the necessary software to bring this all together. That software is called ICS (Internet Connection Services). Thankfully it’s already installed by default, just not configured. You enable ICS on the network interface w/ the broadband connection. ICS then detects the other (local) network interface, assigns it a static IP address of 192.168.0.1, and starts its own DHCP server. Any computers on the other end of that local network interface can then use that DHCP server to obtain their TCP/IP configuration. That configuration includes a unique IP in the 192.168.0.x address space (e.g., 192.168.0.2), DNS servers (usually obtained from the broadband connection), and gateway IP (ICS itself, 192.168.0.1). Once ICS is configured, you merely reboot computer B (so it renews its DHCP request) and it should be working. Computer A is now a router. It manages the traffic back and forth between its two network interfaces on behalf of any computers on the local (192.168.0.x) network.

Of course, we could extend this routing capability to additional computers (C, D, …) by using a switch and/or wireless AP.

< -- broadband (to isp) -->[computer A](lan)<-- wire -->(lan)[switch/wireless AP](lan)<-- wire(s) -->(lan)[computer B, C, D, …]

That's how it works. Once you have the physical connections setup correctly, there actually isn't a whole lot to do other than enable ICS. It pretty much does all the things I described behind the scenes, w/ little to no intervention on your part. Perhaps the only gotcha I can imagine is if computer B is not configured to use DHCP. If that was the case, computer B would obviously not obtain the correct TCP/IP configuration from ICS’s DHCP server, and thus wouldn’t have Internet access.

You could also replace the wired connection between computer A and computer B w/ a wireless ad hoc connection.

< -- broadband (to isp) -->[computer A]<-- wireless (ad hoc) -->[computer B]

Notice this has no bearing AT ALL on ICS, routing, or anything related to Internet access. Any problems you have in establishing that particular connection have nothing to do w/ ICS. That’s why I strongly suggest, even if you wish to use a wireless connection between computer A and computer B, that you start w/ a wired connection and get it working. Then deal w/ any wireless connection issues later. The simpler you keep it in the beginning, the more likely your chances for success.

Yes, it’s definitely a complex process to implement (from the software's perspective), but for YOU, it's actually just a few clicks here and there. I don’t normally go into such detail, but I’m hoping it helps you visualize things better so perhaps it doesn’t seem so intimidating.




September 30, 2010 8:56:37 PM

Great sounds easy but I actually tried something like that minus the configuration of IP address. I had both PC connected with a regular phone line cord, have one PC as the host and enabled allow other network user to connect through connection, and had selected to obtain IP address automatically or something of the sort. Im not sure what exactly you mean by finding a second IP address for computer B how do I go about doing that.
Can we start from the beginning on enabling ICS and what boxes to check and etc...
I originally started trying to use my old PC as the host it has Windows XP but now have the internet connected to my newer PC that has Windows Vista does it matter which one to use as the host? Please Help I would very much be thankful!!
a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 1:29:26 AM

If you want to use Vista as the host, that's fine.

The Vista machine has to have two network interfaces, one leading to the Internet, the other leading to the Windows XP machine. As I said earlier, let's make the latter a wired connection for now.

To make it easier to follow, let's also label the network interfaces.

< -- broadband (to isp) -->(nic #1)[vista](nic #2)(lan)<-- wire -->(lan)(nic #3)[winxp]

You don't have to do anything to else to nic #1 other than enable ICS. Nic #1 is already configured and accessing the internet successfully. Nic #2 will be configured for us by ICS once we start the configuration process. Nic #3 should be configured for DHCP (i.e., to obtain its IP address automatically).

Go to the Vista machine and locate the network connection (in Windows) for nic #1 (go to Start, type “ncpa.cpl” (no quotes) in the Search field, and hit enter). The Network Connections dialog should appear. You should see the network connections for both nic #1 and nic #2. Right click the network connection for nic #1, select Properties, and the Properties dialog appears. You should see two tabs, Networking and Sharing. Select Sharing. Check both boxes (“Allow other network users to connect through…” and “Allow other network users to control…”) and hit OK. The system will take a few seconds to configure ICS (there’s not much to see, it just does it and returns to the Network Connections dialog).
Just so you can “see” what’s happening, I now want you to right click the network connection for nic #2, select Properties, select “Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP v4), and hit Properties. Notice that a static IP of 192.168.0.1 has been assigned to that connection by ICS. If we weren’t using ICS, that would typically have the other option checked (“Obtain an IP address automatically”, which just means it would be DHCP enabled). But ICS has *automatically* configured this network connection for us by assigning a static IP in the 192.168.0.x network. Hit Cancel (yes Cancel, we’re just looking), then hit Cancel again. You’re now back at the Network Connections dialog.

Besides configuring a static IP of 192.168.0.1 on nic #2, ICS has started (behind the scenes) a DHPC server for nic #2. That means that any network devices (like your WinXP machine) connected to that network interface and using DHCP to request their TCP/IP configuration, will be responded to by that same DHCP server. In fact, the DHCP server will give the first computer to respond the IP address of 192.168.0.2. The next computer will be the assigned IP address of 192.168.0.3. Etc.

For the Vista machine, that’s it! That’s all it takes. We spent more time explaining it than it took to configure it. ICS does all the work for us. I’m only explaining all this so you can “see” what’s happening, just in case there’s some oddity about your setup that’s been missed.

There’s now only one step left; to make sure the WinXP machine is using DHCP (so that it will request the TCP/IP configuration from the DHCP server on nic #2).

Go to the WinXP machine, go to Start->Run, type “ncpa.cpl” (no quotes), and hit enter. The Network Connections dialog appears. Locate nic #3, right click it, select Properties, select “Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)”, and hit Properties. Make sure “Obtain an IP address automatically” and “Obtain DNS server address automatically” are checked (again, we want this WinXP machine to talk to the Vista machine and use the DHCP server on nic #2 to get its TCP/IP configuration). Hit OK, then hit OK again. You’re now back at the Network Connections dialog.

At this point, the WinXP machine should be able to reach the Internet. If not, reboot the machine so it renews its DHCP request and see if it’s now connected to the Internet.

As I keep saying, this is a relatively easy setup process. Most of the work is done by ICS. And most likely the WinXP machine was already using DHCP (we only confirmed it).

If this doesn’t work, then there’s something else about your system that you haven’t so far conveyed. In most cases, you just turn on ICS and it works.


October 2, 2010 4:06:58 PM

Thank you for your help and patience. There is only one obstacle when completely the steps. When I go to my lan connection (nic#3) there is no Internet Protocol Version 4 in the menu just Internet Protocol. Do I need to connect PC 2 to the internet and locate a download for Internet Protocol Version 4? I tried just ignoring the version and just follow the steps for PC 2 with Internet Protocol and no connection
a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 4:23:40 PM

vonney0281 said:
Thank you for your help and patience. There is only one obstacle when completely the steps. When I go to my lan connection (nic#3) there is no Internet Protocol Version 4 in the menu just Internet Protocol. Do I need to connect PC 2 to the internet and locate a download for Internet Protocol Version 4? I tried just ignoring the version and just follow the steps for PC 2 with Internet Protocol and no connection


Oops, yep, you're right. Beginning w/ Vista, Windows now supports two versions of TCP/IP (IPv4 and IPv6), so that's why you see both listed in Vista (and Win7). But XP never supported IPv6, so it just read "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)", which is actually IPv4. So just select "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)", that's what you want.
a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 4:31:44 PM

If it doesn't work, then there's obviously something amiss, but I can tell what as yet.

At the WinXP machine, go to Start->Run, type "cmd" (no quotes), and hit enter. In the command window, type "ipconfig > temp.txt" (no quotes), and hit enter. Post the contents of temp.txt here.
a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 4:51:48 PM

Btw, are you using any third party firewalls on the Vista machine? (Norton, McAfee, etc.)? These could be blocking access to the Vista machine. If so, you may need to provide an exception for that connection (probably exclude it completely).
October 2, 2010 7:35:49 PM

I tried typing in ipconfig > temp.txt and nothing. It just start another line. I think I do have a third party firewall it's called something like Avest and is running a On-screen scanner, well I turned it off. In my windows firewall screen is internet sharing to be check or unchecked to allow. So what steps do we take now?
October 2, 2010 7:43:32 PM

Also I went to check settings on the firewall for PC #2 and nothing is checked to allow. I didn't know if it needed to be since it's to be receiving and not transmitting.
October 2, 2010 8:12:41 PM

Another thing I tried to do was visa versus, try using Windows Xp as the host but is didn't create the IP address when I selected sharing allowed. Obtain an IP address automatically, remains selected.
a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 8:26:33 PM

vonney0281 said:
I tried typing in ipconfig > temp.txt and nothing. It just start another line. I think I do have a third party firewall it's called something like Avest and is running a On-screen scanner, well I turned it off. In my windows firewall screen is internet sharing to be check or unchecked to allow. So what steps do we take now?


Yes, when ipconfig is executed, it will just return to the C: prompt. That’s because the output from the command, instead of displaying to the screen, has been redirected to the file temp.txt. I want you to upload the contents of that file!

Avest would be a problem if it’s the Vista machine (the one w/ ICS). I'm not familiar w/ the Avest product, but usually these products perform several functions. I skimmed the manual and see it has numerous "shields". Make sure ALL of them are disabled for now. Third party malware products are notorious for creating problems w/ ICS. For testing purposes, you just need to disable all of it, if only for a few minutes to see if it’s the problem.

If the Windows firewall is also active on Vista, you need to ALLOW internet sharing. Normally when ICS is enabled, it just configures this properly. But when you throw third party malware into the mix, Windows doesn't know about it or how to manage it. So again, it's often the source of the problem

vonney0281 said:
Also I went to check settings on the firewall for PC #2 and nothing is checked to allow. I didn't know if it needed to be since it's to be receiving and not transmitting.


As far as PC #2 (the XP machine w/ nic #3), any anti-malware like Avest or Windows firewall shouldn’t be a problem. It's the Vista machine that may be preventing access to its service by the XP machine.


October 2, 2010 8:44:27 PM

Okay where do I locate the temp text file s i can post it?
October 2, 2010 8:46:48 PM

Okay I think I got it,
Windows IP Configuration





Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:



Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected



PPP adapter Cricket Wireless:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 10.123.16.4

Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 10.123.16.4



Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :



Tunnel adapter Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface:



Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::5efe:10.123.16.4%2

Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

a b F Wireless
October 2, 2010 11:04:53 PM

Something’s wrong here.

Make sure you’re not jumping back and forth between Vista and XP as the host, otherwise I can’t keep things straight. I'm still assuming the following:

< -- broadband (to isp) -->(nic #1)[vista](nic #2)(lan)<-- wire -->(lan)(nic #3)[winxp]

The ipconfig you provided not only seems incomplete (perhaps edited?), it seems to be from the Vista machine. I see a reference to the Cricket wireless, an IP address that seems to have come from the cellular provider, etc. Plus, the ethernet connection shows "media disconnected".

Remember, I want to see the FULL ipconfig /all dump from the XP machine. It should show an ethernet connection (nic #3), indicate its DHCP enabled, etc.

If you were to run ipconfig /all on the Vista machine, it would show the Cricket wireless/cellular (nic #1) and an ethernet connection (nic #2) w/ IP address of 192.168.0.1, etc.


October 3, 2010 12:22:32 AM

I originally used XP as the host when trying around things at first. I then later switched to Vista as the host before I got contact with you. I just recently tried using XP as the host with the information you gave me but after I supplied the temp.txt. This info is from only XP I have yet to get the temp.txt from Vista. I will get this to you around 10:00pm tonight. Again thanks so much for your patience.
October 3, 2010 4:56:31 AM

Windows Vista


Windows IP Configuration


PPP adapter Cricket Wireless:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.123.23.201
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 0.0.0.0

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 6:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 7:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:4137:9e76:4a1:24d2:f584:e836
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::4a1:24d2:f584:e836%10
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : ::

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 11:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 12:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Windows XP (nic3)

Ethernet Adapter Local Area Connection

Media State................: Media Disconnected

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo- Interface:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address.................................: fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5
Default Gateway........................:


That's it, I typed ipconfig and looked up the temp.txt and thats all it said. i'm wondering if maybe there is a problem with the hardware on PC 2 XP machine. Could that be why it not picking up a LAN connection? What do you suggest.
a b F Wireless
October 3, 2010 5:46:20 AM

The Cricket wireless shows connection information, although it seems a bit odd:

PPP adapter Cricket Wireless:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.123.23.201
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 0.0.0.0

No default gateway, no dns servers, etc. The wired ethernet connection is worse, it shows media is disconnected:

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

That's the connection that should have a wire leading from the Vista (host w/ ICS) to the XP (guest).

If we just assume the Cricket wireless is working for the moment (and you can certainly verify that from the Vista machine right now), then you have to figure out why Vista is reporting no connection from its wired ethernet port to the XP machine. It's as if there isn’t a network cable between the two machines, or perhaps there is but it’s a bad cable. I can’t help you there. You need to have the machines properly connected before any of this will work.


October 3, 2010 3:03:46 PM

Okay, so I got to find another Ethernet cord to see if that is the problem. I hope it is, it's funny how something so simple can be so frustrating. I was hoping to have this all and done before school stared back up tomorrow and I didn't want to give into the Cricket salesman who just wants me to spend money, lol. Thank you for your help, I really appreciate it.
October 3, 2010 7:05:12 PM

Vista machine

Windows IP Configuration


PPP adapter Cricket Wireless:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 10.122.107.42
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 0.0.0.0

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::95e4:7d35:6d57:be03%11
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.190.3
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 6:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 7:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:4137:9e76:30fa:3d96:f585:94d5
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::30fa:3d96:f585:94d5%10
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : ::

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 11:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 12:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :


XP machine

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Autoconfiguration IP Address . . . . : 169.254.136.67
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .: 255.255.0.0
Defualt Gateway . . . . . . . . . . . .. . : fe80::21e:90ff:fe2b:D d38%4

Tunnel adapter Teredo Tunneling Pseudo- Interface:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address.................................: fe80::ffff:ffff:fffd%5
Default Gateway........................:

Tunnel Adaptrer Automatic Tunneling Pseudo- Interface:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address.................................: fe80::5efe:169.254.136.67%2
Default Gateway........................:

It still is not connected it shows under the LAN connection in the network connection window "Limited or no connectivity"
a b F Wireless
October 3, 2010 11:08:51 PM

Both the Vista and XP machines have now assigned themselves an IP address in the 169.254.x.x range on their respective wired connections. What that means is that both of them are attempting to use DHCP to automatically obtain an IP address. That’s correct as far as the XP machine, but makes no sense wrt the Vista machine.

In the case of the Vista machine, we enabled ICS on the Cricket wireless connection, AND AS I SHOWED YOU, ICS disabled DHPC on the Vista wired connection and assigned itself the IP address 192.168.0.1. It then started its own DHPC server so that the XP machine could then use it. Somehow, apparently, the Vista machine is no longer configured for ICS! It has reverted to using DHCP on the wired connection. So now each end of the wired connection, both Vista and XP, are attempting to reach a non-existent DHCP server, and therefore, their respective DHPC requests fail, and they have no choice but to assign themselves an IP address in the 169.254.x.x range, which is completely useless.

So what happened? How did we go from ICS configured and running on the Vista machine, to having all that disappear and reverting to the old configuration, the one before we ever messed w/ ICS?!
October 9, 2010 10:55:02 PM

Thank you so much for your help. I got it working now it occasionally goes off automatically but I just restart PC 2 and it fixes the problem. I appreciate your help and time I would have been able to get it working if it weren't for you. One question though, if I where to log off the internet with the host PC that would loose connect to PC 2 right?
a b F Wireless
October 10, 2010 7:22:09 PM

If PC1 (the one hosting the Internet connection) disconnects from the Internet, there's no reason communication should be lost between PC1 and PC2 (the guest PC). The only thing PC2 should lose is Internet access. PC1 and PC2 should still have their respective IP configurations on the local network they share in common (192.168.0.1 and 192.168.0.2, respectively). So, for example, trying to ping from one to the other should still work. There would only be a total loss of communication between them if ICS itself was disabled.
!