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Video card error Not enough power.

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October 30, 2007 10:08:30 PM

:fou:  I'm at my wits end here. My system as stated below started getting an error saying not enough power to the video card. Is there a setting I'm missing somewhere in the bios or something?

I'm not running SLI and I have a LC B400 ATX PS, so what is up? What are recommended PS for my system if it needs replacing?

If pics. are needed then just let me know and I can post them.

More about : video card error power

October 30, 2007 10:09:31 PM

Pentium D Processor
October 30, 2007 10:11:15 PM

It did not list items on my system.

EVGA 680i LT
XFX 8600GTS
Pen. D Processor
2 fans on side case
2 fans in rear
plus the fans EVGA and XFX added to the boards
Related resources
October 30, 2007 10:33:47 PM

Ok - first - gut reaction....if the system says you need more power......uh.....you probably need more power.

Second reaction - That seems to be a sad excuse for a power supply.

You will need a new power supply. Read the PSU 101 sticky regarding what to look for in a power supply.

Then, based on that, get the best PSU you can get. Quality matters - this is the component that feeds the rest of your computer with power - so you want to feed it well.

Recomendations - PCP&C, Seasonic, Fortron (FSP) are all excellent. The Corsair brand is popular - and I think they are OEM'd from Seasonic.

Specific recomendations?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I hope this helps.

October 30, 2007 10:56:57 PM

avarice said:
Ok - first - gut reaction....if the system says you need more power......uh.....you probably need more power.

Second reaction - That seems to be a sad excuse for a power supply.

You will need a new power supply. Read the PSU 101 sticky regarding what to look for in a power supply.

Then, based on that, get the best PSU you can get. Quality matters - this is the component that feeds the rest of your computer with power - so you want to feed it well.

Recomendations - PCP&C, Seasonic, Fortron (FSP) are all excellent. The Corsair brand is popular - and I think they are OEM'd from Seasonic.

Specific recomendations?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I hope this helps.


Yes they are nice PSU's but they are WAY overkill for the current system. Could get away with ~430-500 8600GTS dont use much power...

Antec, Thermaltake - have some cheaper psu's 40-100 bux that would be more than enough...
October 30, 2007 10:57:15 PM

One more quick question.

In order for me to hook up the two fans on the side of the case and the video cards 8 pin ATX connection, I have piggy back several connectors. Could it cause a loss in power somewhere?
October 30, 2007 10:58:28 PM

Opps the video is a XFX GForce 8600GTX
October 30, 2007 11:02:23 PM

My video card alone has to have 350W min and 500W min to run SLI. How is LC B400 ATX over kill isn't it 400W? Otherwise why would i get a error message saying it needs more power?
October 31, 2007 4:37:35 AM

Do you have the required power connection from your psu to the card hooked-up?
October 31, 2007 4:49:03 AM

yep, it requires an 8 pin connector.
October 31, 2007 5:54:02 AM

I too had a similar problem with an X800GTO that would not power up, and after removing all power connections and reassembling, it worked. It seemed that the Y-splitter adapter cable thing for the gfx card needed 2 separate feeds from the power supply, as 'daisy chaining' it from one molex power connector to the next, on the same double plugged cable run, didnt work. If you have cables with a single power connector, use them all first.

I got mine working by connecting the gfx cards power cable to a cable 'run' that also goes to a dvd/cd, also a fan only power run, and other low power drawing runs, but not on a run with a hdd on it, that didnt work. (OK I still have IDE :(  )

All said and done, maybe your supply isn't up to the task. It might be short a few watts from its name, which is quite usual if you got the supply with a low cost case.
October 31, 2007 6:08:53 AM

Well if it says you need more power ill assume it needs more power. you seemed to awnser your question when asking it.

400watts is really really really pushing it. Hell i remember from what 5 or so years ago i believe reccomended power was 350watts even for alot of systems.

If your system says you need more power you need more power. Get a quality 550watt thats really 550watt and stop getting 400 watts that are most likely 300 to 350watt.

just because it says 400 really doesnt mean anything. Even if it was 400 watt i personaly wouldnt get something so weak for your system anyways.
a b U Graphics card
October 31, 2007 8:44:03 AM

Alot of psu's apply alot of power where its not needed, like 3 volt or 5 volt, and not the 12 V rails. Being that high wattage will NEVER be demanded from these voltages, it truly isnt what it claims. When buying a psu, always check to see how much the 12 volt combined AVAILIBLE power is. It may say 20 AMPS per rail, but still only deliver 30 amps to both at the same time. Or : 240 watts per 12V rail, with combined or 360 watts to the entire 12 volt rail. You CAN get 240watts on ONE 12V rail, leaving only 120watts for the other rail. If a cheap psu claims 400 watts, it may give 100 to the 3V and 75 to the 5V, leaving only 225 to the 12 volt rail, which drives your gfx and mobo. Always check this layout when purchasing a psu, as any decent brand WILL have it broken down in such a manner
October 31, 2007 10:35:45 AM

I agree that my reccomendations above are a bit of overkill (though I like overkill so as I am not pushing the absolute limit of my equipment.)

Didja read the sticky? C'mon be honest - didja read it? In it you will find a wealth of information, including a great discussion on amps, watts, connectors, and power calculations. If ya don't wanna read it - I suggest the overkill approach.

If you want something a bit less than the FSP power supply that I listed above (which I own and love) - make sure you have at least 18Amps on a minimum of 2 12V rails (preferably 3 or 4). If you have 20 or more Amps on 2 or more rails, that would be better (notice the fine use of number theory - more is ... more)

As for quality, plan on spending at least $80 USD for a power supply. Not the perfect threshold, but high enough that the components should last you a while. Friends don't let friends buy cheep PSUs.

One alternative - is to get a drive bay power supply such as:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

These are intended to take on the load of a graphics card, while leaving your existing PSU in place. For the cost - you could simply just replace the existing PSU of course - but it is an option.

Good luck.
November 4, 2007 12:59:07 AM

I'm pretty sure I read everyone's response before I posted this, but I think I may have the answer:

When connecting the video card's power (8-pin PCI-e plug), you CAN NOT have it daisy chained at all. The plug going into the card has to be a straight shot from the PSU. Otherwise, you'll get a power error. It needs to be a pure, uninterrupted source.

Hope that helps. If not, get a new PSU :) 
November 4, 2007 2:23:24 AM

If the psu doesnt have a dedicated 4,6,8 pin connecter requrdless its time to get a new psu. IMO
November 4, 2007 2:53:21 AM

come to think of it, I second that idea.

If you're running newer hardware, you really should have the PSU to back it all up.

If you have a video card that needs additional power and your PSU doesn't have dedicated cables/plugs for PCIe, then drop the cash and upgrade. That way, you don't have to worry about making sure it's a clean route from the PSU. That part's taken care of for you.
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