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Best value for $... Amd / Intel?

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October 26, 2007 7:13:01 PM


Ok first off please no flaming. I would like to find out what CPU is currently the best value for the money. I really don't care how much money Intel is making or how much money AMD is losing. I am looking for the best overall value for the amount of money spent. I am trying to keep expenses low as I will soon be going to quad probably in another year. I would do it now but for tax purposes it's better if I wait til next year.

I understand the number scheme of AMD processors better than Intel's so that is mainly the reason for this question. With the release of the Black Edition AMD 5000+ AM2 cpu I am leaning toward this right now. The sole purpose is to beef up an existing system to play Crysis. I am not interested in running at extreme clock rates or anything like that. Just want a mid tier system that can handle this game really well.

This AMD cpu I found for $127
AM2 Mother board $139
2 GB ram $140
M$FT Vista Home $ 60
video card ??? may reuse existing card.

All other components I should have already.

So comparing cost to functionality is this better / cheaper than a comparative Intel offering? :heink: 

I think the Black Edition Amd 5000+ is probably the best bang for the buck right now with Amd... anybody have any thoughts?

Remember this is best bang for the buck only. Thanks. :hello: 

More about : amd intel

October 26, 2007 7:23:05 PM

Looks like a solid build. Perhaps the 8800 GT coming up in Nov might be a good deal for ya.

OC'ing only really shines when you buy cheap CPU's that behave like expensive ones.

For example, earlier this year, E4300 were about $170, and the E6600 was around $324. I found an OEM for $133 for my dad, and over clock it to E6600 speed of 2.4ghz.

The main key is to do your shopping well, to try to save as much as you can. My list of parts minus the video card and OS:

E4400 - 126
2gb A-DATA - 90 (30 rebate)
MSI OEM P6N Platinum - 80

So I'm just throwing something at ya just to look at, as well as trying to get the best bang for the buck. I know most people just want to throw something together that runs like its suppose to.

Hopefully this won't turn into a flame thread, but ya never know. :lol: 
October 26, 2007 7:31:18 PM

Get the AMD 5000+ BE or the eXXXX alternative and just OC the heck out of it. The best thing about the BE though is price vs. performance, and the ease of which it can been OC'ed w/o requiring additional cooling. The Intel chips are faster & perform better, but I think you have to buy the "Extreme" versions in order to get the same unlocked multiplier you get with the BE. I'm not choosing sides here! Just stating pro's and con's of each, so all you Intel/AMD fanboys don't try to stir up crap.
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October 26, 2007 7:33:09 PM

1) Only consider the 5000+ Black edition if you are going to OC. Otherwise, there are cheaper AMD X2 Chips that run faster by default.

2) The E2160 for $85 will easily OC to about 3.2 Ghz and can often hit as high as 3.4 on stock cooling. At these speeds it easily easily beats the X2 6000+ which runs neck and neck with the BE 5000+.

This would make the E2160 really the best bang for the buck at the moment.

If you want to kick power up a notch, the E6750 is the next chip most people look at since it will OC much higher than the E2160 and is much faster clock for clock.

I think most of the Chips between the E2160 and the E6750 are not worth the extra cost since they will only OC about the same at best not better. Also most are not as fast as the E6750 clock for clock since many only have 2gb of memory. The E6750 is the first chip that can both clock higher and provide more power per cycle.
(The E6550 often has FSB wall issues when OCing, so I prefer the E6750.)
October 26, 2007 7:37:30 PM

rgeist554 said:
Get the AMD 5000+ BE or the eXXXX alternative and just OC the heck out of it. The best thing about the BE though is price vs. performance, and the ease of which it can been OC'ed w/o requiring additional cooling. The Intel chips are faster & perform better, but I think you have to buy the "Extreme" versions in order to get the same unlocked multiplier you get with the BE. I'm not choosing sides here! Just stating pro's and con's of each, so all you Intel/AMD fanboys don't try to stir up crap.


The unlocked multiplier is not really needed to OC the Intel Chips since you adjust the FSB.
This is really only critical for OCing AMD Chips.

75%+ OCs are the norm for many of the lower speed C2Ds.

a c 83 B Homebuilt system
a b À AMD
a b å Intel
October 26, 2007 7:50:54 PM

AMD with it's integrated memory controller requires good memory to match, the C2D processors run well on almost anything. The AMD mobos also seem to be a bit more expensive. These parts in your post total $406.
You can get a gigabyte DS3L mobo for $95,
2gb of value ram for $55,
E6750 for $195,
total---$345
Look at the cpu charts on toms, and find the workloads that are most important to you. I suspect that the E6750 will beat the AMD. Oh yes, that is even before overclocking.
October 26, 2007 8:13:17 PM

Actually, AMD boards tend to be slightly cheaper because the Intel Boards need a memory controller which is built into the AMD Chip.

The motherboard the OP selected was on of the more expensive ones, so there really is not much of a savings there between many of the really nice P35 mobos.

Abit has a really entry level P35 that is just like the DS3L for only $69.99 after rebate.

The Gigabyte DS3R for about $129 is a great board if you want RAID and some more features that most people really will not use.
October 26, 2007 8:36:17 PM

Quote:
The best thing about the BE though is price vs. performance, and the ease of which it can been OC'ed w/o requiring additional cooling.


You make it sound like raising the multiplier does not increase the amount of power consumption/heat. This is not the case, more cycles/second = more heat.

Quote:
AMD with it's integrated memory controller requires good memory to match, the C2D processors run well on almost anything.


Not true. AMDs generate the memory frequency from a ratio of the processors clock speed. For example:

2400 Mhz clock
Divider 6 -> 2400/6 = 400Mhz (DDR2 800)

OC to 2800 Mhz clock
Divider 7 -> 2800/7 = 400Mhz (DDR2 800)

You just need to know how to overclock, which nowadays, does not require some specialized parts it did in the past (memory in this case).
October 26, 2007 8:44:49 PM

Quote:
You make it sound like raising the multiplier does not increase the amount of power consumption/heat. This is not the case, more cycles/second = more heat.
You can gain up to 15x on the multiplier before having to increase voltage to the core. Check out the review Tom's wrote up on it.
October 26, 2007 11:58:34 PM

Voltage is not the only thing that increases power and in turn heat. Stop pretending like increasing clocks does not consume more power.
October 27, 2007 1:01:36 AM

690G motherboards are sweet-n-cheap-n-current-n-hdmi-n-hdcp-n-lowpower. I'm not sure why you picked a $130 board over a $70 board.
October 27, 2007 1:05:35 AM

zenmaster said:
The unlocked multiplier is not really needed to OC the Intel Chips since you adjust the FSB.
This is really only critical for OCing AMD Chips.

75%+ OCs are the norm for many of the lower speed C2Ds.


It's not critical for AMD chips, I have OC'ed the hell out of some opty's without an unlocked multi. It just makes it easier for people that don't know what they are doing.
October 27, 2007 1:13:12 AM

True, Critical may have been a bad choice of words.
Most just pointing out that the Unlocked multiplier rarely limits the OC potential of many C2Ds.

Yeah, Opty's are/were OCing Beasts.
October 27, 2007 1:27:30 AM

Grab the processor from the company you like best, that appeals to you. It is EXACTLY like choosing a car.

If AMD has slower processors, they are only priced accordingly.

I just can't believe how good this industry is to the consumer at this point in time!
October 27, 2007 1:36:25 AM

I agree AMD boards are alot cheaper than Intel Boards. Talking about good chips or even the cheaper chips 1 reason is the memory controller.

Thats why DDR2 is cheaper than DDR which includes memory controller per stick

AMD is better for price and performance. And better to upgrade later since no need to change board when AMD Quadcore/Tricore comes.
October 27, 2007 1:45:12 AM

pogsnet, where the HELL did you get that cat with the AK-47, I can't stop looking at it. I had a few beers and it is preventing me from blinking
October 27, 2007 1:48:09 AM

lols, it is called mad cat. I got much worth watching avatar than that.

I wonder you are using opteron which is your avatar.
October 27, 2007 1:58:53 AM

Thanks y'all for the suggestions. The reason I listed the mobo at $139 is that I know I can get one at this price point. I bought a cheaper mobo before that was part of a processor bundle and had nothing but problems with it... d@mn via.

Also curious does anyone know if the Quad opty's will run in AM2 mobo?

That might sinch my decision... being I've still got 2 plus weeks I can figure this a couple of times and see what is going to be the best way to go with this.

Looks like intel is e2160 or e6750, but I think if the upcoming opty quads can use the AM2 board the BE will likely be the better choice for me.

Thanks.
October 27, 2007 2:06:57 AM

Yes it can run Opty procie AM2 boards if the Opty is designed for AM2. Or BTW the upcoming Phenom X4 or Tricor.


I suggest wait for RD790 FX chipset mobo for AMD which is coming this November. Better OCed and new features such as PCE-e 2.0, HT 3.0

No DDR3 on AMD since memory controller is controlled by procie and not the board, maybe until new procie arrives.

Reference: http://techreport.com/discussions.x/13461
October 28, 2007 7:08:09 PM

Ok I've looked at countless mobo combinations :pt1cable:  and I think right now Amd has more bang for the buck.

AMD

5000+ BE $127
MSI K9AGM3 $ 77
OCZ 2GB 800Mhz DDR2 $ 55
Vista Home Basic U/G $ 41

= $300 gives plenty of room for unexpected's like PSU / video card etc.
PC can serve multiple purposes... HTPC as one example another possible mobo choice is ECS AMD 690GM-M2 and is $4 cheaper.

Intel

E2160 C2D $ 78.00
Gigabyte GA-P35-DS3L $ 91.00
OCZ 2GB 800 Mhz DDR2 $ 55.00
Vista Home Basic U/G $ 41.00

= $265 While slightly cheaper the mobo offers less in terms of functionality as opposed to Amd solution IE no firewire / HDMI... it's very hard to find an intel board that offers both HDMI and Firewire, I got tired of looking. Also the form factor is ATX and I would be more likely to have to buy another case after I looked at what I currently own. I could make it work in another PC I own but not sure I want to do that. I did find firewire quite often with an Intel board but I would suspect and Intel board would not allow me to OC the E2160 am I right in this assumption?

Moving to the Intel E6750 really isn't cost effective at more that $100 more for that solution. If I wasn't planning a move to quad by next year sometime this solution might make more sense.

So if I am missing something obvious on the Intel let me know..... :sol: 
November 4, 2007 2:04:58 AM

I would go for the ABIT P35-E. Seems to be a lot of deals on this recently and with BF on the horizon, one can only assume with MIR the price will be in the mid $60s.

If you desperately need Firewire, add a PCI card for > $15 and isn't HDMI on your video card?
!