8800GT

Will the 8800GT need PCIE2.0 or will a 1.0 motherboard be enough?
11 answers Last reply
More about 8800gt
  1. 2.0 is needed yes
  2. itotallybelieveyou said:
    2.0 is needed yes


    This is not true... (or you have taken question to wrong context)

    A PCI-e 1.0 motherboard will run a 8800GT, as the 2.0 specification is backwards compatible.
  3. itotallybelieveyou said:
    2.0 is needed yes


    Whaaaat!?! Where on earth do you get your info? :heink: If Nvidia made its new 8800 series PCI-E 2.0 only cards we would all have to rush out and buy the X38 just to use the card, comeon! Think before you spray out assumptions!
  4. Sorry I was in a rush and did not finish my whole question. I am aware that it is backwards compatible.

    My question is is there enough bandwidth in PCIE1.0 motherboard so that my GPU will not be bottlenecked?
  5. theres enough bandwidth, assuming youre using a 16x slot. if youre using 8x and less, youll run into a bandwidth ceiling.
  6. nickc07 said:
    Sorry I was in a rush and did not finish my whole question. I am aware that it is backwards compatible.

    My question is is there enough bandwidth in PCIE1.0 motherboard so that my GPU will not be bottlenecked?


    The 8800Ultra can't even saturate the PCI-e 1.0 bus, it will be at least another year before....
  7. From what I understand PCIe 1.0 and PCIe 2.0 slots have the same x16 bandwidth interface. The only difference is that PCIe 2.0 delivers 150 Watts of power to the graphic card where as PCIe 1.0 only puts out 75 watts.

    The main intention behind the development of the PCIe 2.0 slot was to eliminate the need for power cables to be connected to video card.

    PCIe 2.0 cards will work fine on PCIe 1.0 slots. You just have to make sure all of the power cables are hooked up to the card.

    However I think I read somwhere that even with PCI-e 2.0 slots Nvidia still recommends a 6 pin adaptor be plugged in for their higher end enthusiast cards like the newly released 8800GT.
  8. Good to know
  9. There is actually a difference in bandwidth as PCI-E 2.0 spec doubled the bandwidth from 2.5Gbit/s to 5.0Gbit/s. However as nothing needs that much bandwidth yet, it is really just the power spec that is a notable change for now. In the future the speed may come in handy, but no current card needs more bandwidth then the old PCI-E spec offered.
  10. That doubled bandwidth is a big improvement. 8800gt actually performs fast than that of 8800gts 640mb. The 8800gt has the highest shader units in its class. It has shader 112 units which is very impressive. The 8800gt's graphics memory is intended to run at 1000mhz but the reference designed to run at 900mhz. With good memory properties you can easily clock it to run 1000mhz (2000mhz ddr). Some of the con's i can think of right now that is a big problem is the fan. The card actually gets quite hot. Another thing is with the new Zotac 8800GT AMP 700MHz actually scored higher than the 8800GTX in 3dmark06. So i would think its one of the best bang for buck video cards out there. Cheaper than the 640mb 8800gts but around the same price of the 320mb it still performs a lot better. So the pci-e 2.0 is a big plus. Check out tom's hardware for detail.
  11. Rambocambo said:
    That doubled bandwidth is a big improvement. 8800gt actually performs fast than that of 8800gts 640mb. The 8800gt has the highest shader units in its class. It has shader 112 units which is very impressive. The 8800gt's graphics memory is intended to run at 1000mhz but the reference designed to run at 900mhz. With good memory properties you can easily clock it to run 1000mhz (2000mhz ddr). Some of the con's i can think of right now that is a big problem is the fan. The card actually gets quite hot. Another thing is with the new Zotac 8800GT AMP 700MHz actually scored higher than the 8800GTX in 3dmark06. So i would think its one of the best bang for buck video cards out there. Cheaper than the 640mb 8800gts but around the same price of the 320mb it still performs a lot better. So the pci-e 2.0 is a big plus. Check out tom's hardware for detail.


    Double the bandwidth that won't be used for sometime, its the power (watts) that comes into play so you can decrease the number of 6Pin PCI-E connectors used. Its more about having 150 watts then it is about having double the bandwidth. Current PCI-E 6Pin power connectors are limited to 75 watts, and the new 8Pin connectors that supply 150 watts of power.
Ask a new question

Read More

Motherboards Components Product