XP Full/upgrade what?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
CDs.

Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk or
OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.

Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.

My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or do
I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix problems
or to reinstall.

Any assistance appreciated.
11 answers Last reply
More about full upgrade what
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Many computers have an option to create the necessary CDs.
    Check your manual and/or contact the seller of the computer for the options
    of getting the CDs.

    If you have to go to Microsoft, you will pay full price.

    --
    Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar
    http://www.dts-l.org


    "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...
    >I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    > CDs.
    >
    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk
    > or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >
    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or
    > do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    > for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    > problems
    > or to reinstall.
    >
    > Any assistance appreciated.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...
    > I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    > CDs.
    >
    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk
    or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.

    So do I. If you buy a computer from a small retail outlet you can usually
    specify exactly what you want although it may cost you slightly more. You
    also get the discs if you build your own PC obviously. It's slightly harder
    to find a laptop supplied with all the discs (not forgetting the vendor
    specific drivers a portable might need) but perhaps not impossible?

    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or
    do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    > for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    problems
    > or to reinstall.

    Perhaps..
    http://www.easydesksoftware.com/news/news1.htm
    http://www.easydesksoftware.com/recovery.htm
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Wed, 13 Jul 2005 22:55:01 -0700, "Skiph"
    <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    >years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    >CDs.
    >
    >Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk or
    >OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    >Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >
    >My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or do
    >I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    >for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix problems
    >or to reinstall.
    >
    >Any assistance appreciated.
    >

    You can purchase and use the "Retail Upgrade" CD IF:
    1) You have a current installation of Windows 98/98SE/ME/NT
    4.1+/Windows 2000/WindowsXP Home/Pro on your HD when you install XP.
    This is the way to go if you do not have the OS installation CD for a
    previous version of Windows.
    2) You possess the OS installation CD from a previous version of
    Windows. This OS install CD MUST be a FULL RETAIL CD,or so-called
    "FULL OEM" CD. This is the best situation, and you will pay at least
    $100 less than the "FULL RETAIL" version of the XP install CD. The
    "Retail Upgrade" CD can do either a clean install, which will entail
    the destruction of all programs and data on your HD, and will wind up
    with the most stable installation of XP, or an upgrade, which will
    keep your current file system intact, but may be unstable.

    Current XP "Full Retail" prices:
    From Microsoft
    XP Pro -- $299 XP Home -- $199. The COAs for these products will be
    printed directly on the distribution packaging, while the Product Key
    will be printed on a piece of orange paper, and stuck to the back of
    the product sleeve.

    From third-party distributors
    XP Pro -- $250 and up XP Home -- $125 and up
    The COA and Product Keys for these packages will be the same as the
    packages from Microsoft, since the distribution packages are
    manufactured by Microsoft.

    Current XP "Full OEM" prices:
    Around $125
    This package contains all the code as a "Full Retail", but will not be
    able to perform an "Upgrade" install and will necessitate the
    destruction of all programs and data on your HD(although some "Full
    OEM" packages will allow you to perform a "Repair Install", which will
    keep your file system structure mostly intact.) "Full OEM" packages
    contain the COA and Product key printed on specially-printed stickers
    containing Microsoft holograms.

    These stickers are almost always found attached to the shrink-wrap of
    the package containing the CD and introduction booklet. Be very
    careful when disposing of this shrink wrap, since most distributors of
    "Full OEM" software seldom record the CD keys distributed with each
    package they sell, and you will have to purchase a completely new
    license for XP if the COA is lost.

    Microsoft has recently changed its policy concerning Internet
    Activation of some OEM software: They now no longer allow automatic
    Activation of the newly-installed software via the Internet. For the
    affected copies of OEM software, an activation via telephone is
    required. While Microsoft has not announced this change for ALL OEM
    copies of XP, they MAY change their activation policy at any time for
    ALL OEM copies of XP.

    I personally advise people to purchase the XP "Retail Upgrade"
    installation media, since they will save at least $100 on their
    purchase, and they will always be guaranteed an Internet Activation of
    their software, and they can be assured that they have genuine
    Microsoft software, which will be fully supported by Microsoft.

    Although, if you really need to save money, purchase the "Full OEM"
    distribution package. But make sure it is not a "Pull" (a
    manufacturer's OEM which was originally produced for distribution with
    a new computer, but never used. The COAs of packages like these will
    contain a string on the COA containing the name of the manufacturer
    the CD was manufactured for. If the distributor of these packages is
    on Microsoft's list of manufacturers of computers for which Microsoft
    has disallowed Internet Activations, you will be at the mercy of
    Microsoft for activation of your software.

    I also advise EVERYONE to NOT purchase XP software via auction
    services such as eBay. XP software sold on eBay is notorious for
    being pirated. Purchasing pirated software will only ensure no
    updates from Microsoft. While it MAY save you a few bucks, it will
    almost always result in eventually having to purchase a legitimate
    license for XP at your own expense, and will make you a law-breaker if
    you use it.

    Donald L McDaniel
    Please reply to the original thread.
    If you must reply via email, remove the obvious
    from my email address before sending.
    =======================================================
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Instead of wasting the money on the XP cd, use it to purchase one of the
    many imaging applications out there and create an image of your XP partition
    to cd, dvd or an external disk. It will cost you a whole lot less money and
    give you the ability to restore your laptop to exactly where it was when you
    imaged it. I built my own pc and have XP Home. The only time I've needed
    that cd was when I installed it, haven't taken it out of the pkg it came in
    since.

    "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...
    I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    CDs.

    Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk or
    OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.

    Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.

    My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or do
    I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix problems
    or to reinstall.

    Any assistance appreciated.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "BR549" <sirspamalot@spammer.com> wrote in message
    news:iDtBe.159693$VH2.55042@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    > Instead of wasting the money on the XP cd, use it to purchase one of the
    > many imaging applications out there and create an image of your XP
    > partition
    > to cd, dvd or an external disk. It will cost you a whole lot less money
    > and
    > give you the ability to restore your laptop to exactly where it was when
    > you
    > imaged it. I built my own pc and have XP Home. The only time I've needed
    > that cd was when I installed it, haven't taken it out of the pkg it came
    > in
    > since.
    >

    Unfortunately, this approach doesn't help if you need to run the recovery
    console or a repair install (for which you need a bootable CD).

    There is always a data difference between an image and the current state of
    a system. Simply re-installing an image can guarantee data loss, unless
    you've carefully set up the system so that every bit of user data is on a
    non-system partition. But even then, there will be registry differences.

    Many systems that come without OS disks do come with instructions to make
    one. It's a very good idea to follow these directions. One needs to wind
    up with a bootable OS install disk, with the recovery console available.

    Alternately, contact the system supplier and request a bootable OS disk.
    Some charges may apply - this scheme is intended to save money for the
    manufacturer and customer.

    Manufacturers who will only provide the ability to restore a system to
    factory specs, with no care for data loss, should not be patronized.

    HTH
    -pk

    > "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...
    > I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    > CDs.
    >
    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk
    > or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >
    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or
    > do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    > for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    > problems
    > or to reinstall.
    >
    > Any assistance appreciated.
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Skiph wrote:
    > I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    > CDs.
    >

    Are you not also, in general, paying less and less for each subsequent
    computer? So is it really any surprise that you're also getting less?


    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >


    Legally, the OEM has met it's contractual obligation to Microsoft by
    providing a means of returning the PC to its ex-factory state, whether
    it's a Recovery CD or a Recovery Partition. Sadly, they are not legally
    obliged to provide a true installation CD as part of the sale.
    Reputable, customer-service aware OEMs, like Dell, MPC, and Gateway,
    (there may well be others, but these spring to mind immediately) do
    provide a full OEM installation CD, that does permit custom
    installations and repairs. Many uncaring OEMs, especially those who
    sell their computers through department stores and chain outlets, such
    as Compaq, HP, eMachines, and Sony, however, in an effort to save
    pennies and reduce their support costs by having to hire support people
    that can only say "Boot from the Recovery CD to return your PC to its
    original condition," provide only a CD bearing a disk image of the hard
    drive as it left the factory. These Recovery/Restore CDs cannot perform
    normal installations, nor can they be used to do any sort of customizations.

    Essentially, it boils down to "You get what you pay for."


    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >


    The "old way" still exists. One can still get a full set of OS,
    application, and driver CDs with a new computer, but one must be
    somewhat selective in choosing computer brands, and be willing to pay a
    bit more.


    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk?


    Before buying an unnecessary retail license, you should first contact
    the laptop's manufacturer to see if they are willing to provide you (at
    a nominal cost) with an installation or recovery CD.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    >years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    >CDs.
    >
    >Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk or
    >OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    >Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >
    >My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or do
    >I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    >for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix problems
    >or to reinstall.
    >
    >Any assistance appreciated.
    >

    Check with your laptop manufacturer's customer service dept. They may
    be willing to provide you with the installation CDs, but there may be
    a charge for this.

    Also inquire about the type of CD that they provide - is it just a
    "system recovery" disk image of the factory install or is it an
    installation CD that includes the ability to boot to Recovery Console
    and to do a Repair Install.

    Good luck


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
    http://aumha.org/alex.htm
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    It's difficult to survive w/o an XP CD these days. You can buy an old
    qualifing OS for a few bucks and then the upgrade version of XP - saves you
    some; alternatively, ask the vendor of the laptop for a solution to make
    your own XP CD.

    Michael

    "Skiph" <Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...
    >I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way of
    > CDs.
    >
    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver disk
    > or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new system.
    >
    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade or
    > do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I see it
    > for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    > problems
    > or to reinstall.
    >
    > Any assistance appreciated.
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Someone earlier suggested using a image and I have to agree that it is
    one of the better solutions. While you do have to be careful about
    backing your files onto a non-system partition, it restores everything
    quickly.

    Second option is to just burn one, I am almost positive you can copy
    a XP installation CD, and as long as you have a cd key you are good to
    go. At the HelpDesk I was working at we had many copies of the install
    cd which seemed to work flawlessly.

    -Matt

    Phillips Wrote:
    > It's difficult to survive w/o an XP CD these days. You can buy an old
    > qualifing OS for a few bucks and then the upgrade version of XP -
    > saves you
    > some; alternatively, ask the vendor of the laptop for a solution to
    > make
    > your own XP CD.
    >
    > Michael
    >
    > "Skiph" Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com wrote in message
    > news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...-
    > I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last
    > few
    > years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way
    > of
    > CDs.
    >
    > Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver
    > disk
    > or
    > OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >
    > Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new
    > system.
    >
    > My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade
    > or
    > do
    > I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I
    > see it
    > for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    > problems
    > or to reinstall.
    >
    > Any assistance appreciated.
    >
    > -


    --
    matt_fleming
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    You can do lots of things - even create your own XP Cd using your XP
    installation (the I386 folder) on hard drive and all type of tools available
    on the web; however, it's tedious and not always successful. In other words,
    it's not worth the time (unless you make a hobby out of it :) if you can get
    a genuine XP Pro CD.

    Imaging also might save you at least to some retrievable files - restoring
    the boot partition is not always completly successful either. Acronis True
    Image 8.0, or BootIt NG would do for that.
    No matter what you do, save whatever precious files you have on some media
    asap.
    Michael

    "matt_fleming" <matt_fleming.1s81po@pcbanter.net> wrote in message
    news:matt_fleming.1s81po@pcbanter.net...
    >
    > Someone earlier suggested using a image and I have to agree that it is
    > one of the better solutions. While you do have to be careful about
    > backing your files onto a non-system partition, it restores everything
    > quickly.
    >
    > Second option is to just burn one, I am almost positive you can copy
    > a XP installation CD, and as long as you have a cd key you are good to
    > go. At the HelpDesk I was working at we had many copies of the install
    > cd which seemed to work flawlessly.
    >
    > -Matt
    >
    > Phillips Wrote:
    >> It's difficult to survive w/o an XP CD these days. You can buy an old
    >> qualifing OS for a few bucks and then the upgrade version of XP -
    >> saves you
    >> some; alternatively, ask the vendor of the laptop for a solution to
    >> make
    >> your own XP CD.
    >>
    >> Michael
    >>
    >> "Skiph" Skiph@discussions.microsoft.com wrote in message
    >> news:2D191BE6-BCCD-4B70-AB12-A997F5A6839C@microsoft.com...-
    >> I have a brand spanking new lap top. And I have noticed over the last
    >> few
    >> years that when I buy a computer I am getting less and less in the way
    >> of
    >> CDs.
    >>
    >> Now I got a card with a blue circle on it saying there is no driver
    >> disk
    >> or
    >> OS disk. And tells me how I can restore my system to new condition.
    >>
    >> Liked it the old way better when we got a full OS disk with a new
    >> system.
    >>
    >> My question is, I have XP Pro, I want an OS disk. Can I buy an upgrade
    >> or
    >> do
    >> I have to shell out for the full OS disk? From a reputable source I
    >> see it
    >> for 250 USD. That's a bit steep just for pieces parts to update/fix
    >> problems
    >> or to reinstall.
    >>
    >> Any assistance appreciated.
    >>
    >> -
    >
    >
    > --
    > matt_fleming
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    matt_fleming <matt_fleming.1s81po@pcbanter.net> wrote:

    >

    >Second option is to just burn one, I am almost positive you can copy
    >a XP installation CD, and as long as you have a cd key you are good to
    >go. At the HelpDesk I was working at we had many copies of the install
    >cd which seemed to work flawlessly.
    >

    That is not likely to work. In order to do so it would require that
    the CD be for the same version and type of Windows XP as is the CD
    key.

    There are 4 versions of Windows XP:
    Home, Pro, Media Center, and Tablet PC

    There are (at least) 6 different types of Windows XP:
    Retail Full Install, Retail Upgrade, OEM SLP, OEM Generic, Volume
    License, and Value Pack.

    Product keys are coded specifically for both the version and type of
    Windows XP and will not work with a CD that is not of the same version
    and type.

    Hope this clarifies the situation.

    Good luck


    Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
    --
    Microsoft MVP
    On-Line Help Computer Service
    http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

    In memory of a dear friend Alex Nichol MVP
    http://aumha.org/alex.htm
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