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Intel Stock Heat Sink for e8400

Last response: in Overclocking
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February 22, 2008 3:38:17 AM

I'm building a system for my son-in-law. Just doing prelim testing before installing the OS and saw that the BIOS was reporting high temperatures for the CPU 36 to 38 centigrade. The stock heat sink is on tight and I used Artic Silver. Past experience with Core Duo processors, had me expecting temperatures no higher than the low thirties. I finally noticed that the stock heat sink for the e8400 is considerably smaller than heat sinks for the e6600 or the e6750. I've got a couple of the old larger intel heat sinks, I was thinking of switching out the new one. Is this a good idea or a bad one?

Thanks for any response.

Tom
February 22, 2008 5:16:48 AM

I would honestly get a HSF from an etailer that had metal base connectors. The stock ones fall off all the time and cause those high temps. Since you invested largley in the cpu invest 20-40 in HSF!

I would stick with stock one if anything... dont switch out if you arent going to get a nice one. I have thermalright ultra-120 extreme and couldnt be more happy... and only for 50 bucks it keeps my temps in the lower 30s with a nice overclock.
February 22, 2008 9:15:12 PM

Use Coretemp to find out your...well, core temps.
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February 23, 2008 6:33:27 AM

Yes, the e8xxx are so much more power-efficient that Intel seems to have started shipping cheaper coolers with them.
Definitely use CoreTemp 0.96.1 to find out Tj's -- people have reported unexpected temp readings with the e8xxx, so there's likely some calibration issues with the Tcase sensor (which relies on proper data tables in the MB BIOS). After getting some more data, I'd personally probably swap in a beefier Intel cooler, but the stock one should be fine unless you're planning on OCing.
As hh implies, the poor Intel 4-push-pin design is too easy to not-quite-properly install, leading to higher-than-expected temps. Here's a link to some details on how to minimize the chances of problems (key is mounting the cooler before installing the MB in the case): http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/194385-31-part-assemb...
February 23, 2008 9:11:11 AM

Have you put a thermal paste on the cooler/CPU ? The air flow in the case is very important, too.
If the coolers you mentioned are bigger try to switch them to reduce the temperatures. For example those of Pentium-D processor has cooper part with bigger aluminum radiators.
February 23, 2008 3:15:35 PM

I had a problem with memory, so I just finished installing the OS today. I've put on a few of the push pin design heat sinks, I hate them but I know how to verify a good install. I'm paying for some of this new PC and my son-in-law is covering the rest (about 1/2 and 1/2). He didn't want to spend anymore money on it right now, he has got a baby on the way and I'm going to be a Grandpa. Thus even though I tried to talk him into a after market heat sink, he said no. I'll run coretemp today and see what I've got. My big concern with replacing the new heat sink with an old model is pressure on the CPU heat spreader. Is there going to be a difference that I should be concerned about?

Tom
February 23, 2008 3:44:25 PM

ExTechie said:
I had a problem with memory, so I just finished installing the OS today. I've put on a few of the push pin design heat sinks, I hate them but I know how to verify a good install. I'm paying for some of this new PC and my son-in-law is covering the rest (about 1/2 and 1/2). He didn't want to spend anymore money on it right now, he has got a baby on the way and I'm going to be a Grandpa. Thus even though I tried to talk him into a after market heat sink, he said no. I'll run coretemp today and see what I've got. My big concern with replacing the new heat sink with an old model is pressure on the CPU heat spreader. Is there going to be a difference that I should be concerned about?

Tom

No... those things are tough... My thermalright puts a lot of pressure... I mean a lot! I wouldnt worry about that.

Maybe grandpa you could be a sport and get him one as a gift!

Here is the one I got... I paid $55

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
February 23, 2008 6:50:02 PM

I've been thinking about it. But out of a total build cost of about $750.00, six hundred has been from me. Plus, I would like to make use of those older, never been used, intel heat sinks.


Tom
February 23, 2008 7:21:46 PM

All the Intel LGA775 coolers should physically mount the same, so an older cooler designed for a higher-heat LGA775 should work just fine.
!