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Xp home wont boot on my c drive..can i just install another os on my extended pa

Last response: in Windows XP
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April 2, 2010 10:25:31 PM

ok guys I've give up on this problem somewhat of having xp not able to boot. won't boot to recovery console,dos, etc. is there a way I can just install vista on my extended partition just so I can login to the system,backup my data and format c drive at a later date...once I do that...create an extended partition out of the formatted c drive. is this possible?
April 3, 2010 4:35:06 PM

yes you can install vista in other partition....

but u cannot format xp as if u do u will not be able to boot

u can change the priority from advance option in my computer to avoid so hope if u

like can select my ans as best ... if any problem send me msg.

thank u
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April 3, 2010 5:11:40 PM

The safest method (if your data is really important) would be to take out your current hard disk drive, set it aside, and install a new (or another) hard disk to install Windows to. Once you have a bootable computer, you can retrieve your data from the old hard disk drive by connecting it as a secondary drive on your motherboard, or by using a USB converter to connect it as an external
USB hard drive. A new drive should run you under a hundred dollars and the usb adapter usually runs under $30.00.

Mind you, this is only the safest route. Did you try booting off your XP CD and choosing the second repair option (not the first which is recovery console). Many versions of XP will recognize that XP had been previously installed and offer to do a Repair Install. A repair install would only replace missing or damaged windows files, but it will not delete your data. The worst thing that would happen is that not all you apps may work because of previous registry damage. So would have to reinstall those apps if this happens.
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April 3, 2010 5:21:22 PM

digitalprospecter said:
The safest method (if your data is really important) would be to take out your current hard disk drive, set it aside, and install a new (or another) hard disk to install Windows to. Once you have a bootable computer, you can retrieve your data from the old hard disk drive by connecting it as a secondary drive on your motherboard, or by using a USB converter to connect it as an external
USB hard drive. A new drive should run you under a hundred dollars and the usb adapter usually runs under $30.00.

Mind you, this is only the safest route. Did you try booting off your XP CD and choosing the second repair option (not the first which is recovery console). Many versions of XP will recognize that XP had been previously installed and offer to do a Repair Install. A repair install would only replace missing or damaged windows files, but it will not delete your data. The worst thing that would happen is that not all you apps may work because of previous registry damage. So would have to reinstall those apps if this happens.



What is the need to spend for "set it aside, and install a new (or another) hard disk to install Windows "

"using a USB converter to connect it as an external "

Now it certain you dont know that when a operating system is installed in hdd and wen u try to connect it with the extrnal case ..

It totally damage's the os and his needed files....... I personally had used it for ur info


extrnal is great only wen u need to use a complete os free hdd whether it is sata or pata hdd... [:huntluck:7]
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April 3, 2010 5:32:35 PM

Not at all Huntluck. Getting his computer working with a new hard disk drive will leave his exisiting hard drive untouched. We do this process over a dozen times a day in our service shop, especially with business clients who can't risk data loss (you'd be surprised how many people still don't perform regular backups on their own!).

The only difference between what I described and our shop is that in our shop we simply take the customers hard drive out of their computer and connect it as an external USB (or internal secondary drive) and copy their data to our own service computer. Then we (if necessary) reformat and reinstall their Windows on their computer using their original hard drive and then restore the data from our backup.

I suggest buying the new hard disk drive in this instance, because the user did not specify that they had a second computer on their premises to do the process as we do. If the data is still on their hard disk, my process will insure that it stays there unharmed. As I said, it is not the only way... but I believe that it is the safest way.

Cheers!
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April 3, 2010 5:53:41 PM

digitalprospecter said:
Not at all Huntluck. Getting his computer working with a new hard disk drive will leave his exisiting hard drive untouched. We do this process over a dozen times a day in our service shop, especially with business clients who can't risk data loss (you'd be surprised how many people still don't perform regular backups on their own!).

The only difference between what I described and our shop is that in our shop we simply take the customers hard drive out of their computer and connect it as an external USB (or internal secondary drive) and copy their data to our own service computer. Then we (if necessary) reformat and reinstall their Windows on their computer using their original hard drive and then restore the data from our backup.

I suggest buying the new hard disk drive in this instance, because the user did not specify that they had a second computer on their premises to do the process as we do. If the data is still on their hard disk, my process will insure that it stays there unharmed. As I said, it is not the only way... but I believe that it is the safest way.

Cheers!



Just tell me one thing what is the need to such long process [:huntluck:4] ..... I know that process very well but instead using extrnal devices he can just do with is single handed computer

you did'nt read the forum

READ HERE

"Xp home wont boot on my c drive..can i just install another os on my extended pa"

i suggest u know better what it means
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April 3, 2010 6:10:32 PM

Hi Blackns,

You can try installing your Vista to your extended partition and see if you can dual boot. I am assuming that the extended partition already exists and is formatted.

If you want to try the Vista install route, let me know and I will email you extended instructions. Just be real careful to choose the correct partition when you install, otherwise you could lose the data that you want to protect!

I am just real careful where peoples data is concerned and do not favour the not-in-person support processes that leave room for error.
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April 3, 2010 6:16:33 PM

digitalprospecter said:
Hi Blackns,

You can try installing your Vista to your extended partition and see if you can dual boot. I am assuming that the extended partition already exists and is formatted.

If you want to try the Vista install route, let me know and I will email you extended instructions. Just be real careful to choose the correct partition when you install, otherwise you could lose the data that you want to protect!

I am just real careful where peoples data is concerned and do not favour the not-in-person support processes that leave room for error.



Hey dude

now here you are .............i agree with u friend on this statement ......................... :hello:  :D 

I recommend you to plz read first what exactly he or she wants in any forum

thanx bye!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :non: 
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April 3, 2010 9:45:31 PM

thanx for the help. im going to go ahead and install vista on the e drive. will I be able to access my xp files once I install it? I just need to copy a few from the c drive before formatting it
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Best solution

April 3, 2010 10:11:11 PM

Yes. You should have access to those files if the file system isn't already corrupted, but installing Vista on your E: drive will not cause you to lose anything on your C: that isn't already lost. In other words, it can't hurt (just do not install Vista to the C: drive during the install process and read each screen carefully).

Let us know how you make out.
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April 6, 2010 12:18:42 AM

ok vista is installed and running. I'm In the process of transfering data to this side of the hdd and installing updates. One more question, the e drive has now been renamed the c drive. Once i format the the extended partition (which is now the d drive but was before the c drive...stay with me)...will i have to go through the whole computer management thing of assigning allocated space or will the space just automatically become d:127gb of unused space? Right now my current drive is set for only like 104 gb


i really appreciate all the help guys!
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April 6, 2010 12:26:51 AM

Best answer selected by blackns.
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April 6, 2010 12:29:59 AM

Make sure you back up all your important data to an external storage media before you try formatting what was the C: drive. CD, DVD, flash drive, or external USB Hard disk will do. I am not 100% sure what will happen because you are now dual-booting at startup. You might loose the ability to get back into either partition!

You might be better off to reinstall XP to what is now your extended partition and the location of your original XP install.

I think we had better call in some advise from someone who has more dual-boot experience than I do. Meantime, backup any data to be safe!
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April 6, 2010 2:03:08 AM

Hi again,

I've put in a request for another individual to check this thread out and advise on your next step regarding your other partition reformatting. He is offlinbe right now, but should be back tomorrow I would imagine. We just don't want to see you take a step backwards at this point!

Cheers.
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April 6, 2010 3:51:28 AM

Hey guys
Where is the important data? First, I would recommend moving it to a USB or external drive, as digitalprospector suggested.

Is the goal to recreate the dual boot, and restore the files to that main drive?
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April 6, 2010 4:07:12 AM

Hi aford10. Thanks for popping in.

blackns has a corrupted XP install on the original Primary partition and went the route of installing Vista on his extended partition as a dual boot so that he could access and copy his data from the XP partition. He has done this and now wants to know if he can format the xp partition and keep the Vista install. I am not sure if this would kill the dual boot as well and leave him in a non bootable state. I recommended moving his data off the computer onto backup media of some type. I would normally suggest simply reloading the O/S of his choice as a fresh install at this point as I thought the goal was to get xp running again, but he may want to keep Vista now. What do you think?
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April 6, 2010 4:26:01 AM

The dual boot can be set up from this point, if done correctly. Vista is now set as the C drive, right? That means the PC is using the BCD (boot configuration data) to boot, which is on the main partition (C).

From that point, the partition containing the corrupt XP install can be formatted, and reinstalled, as if setting up a new dual boot.

If that is the desired configuration, follow this guide. Pay special attention to the bottom of pg.2. The boot manager is different between Vista and XP. This is where you can run into trouble if not done correctly. That is why it's important to back up the files before proceeding.
http://www.syschat.com/dual-boot-vista-xp-vista-already...
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April 6, 2010 6:21:45 AM

1 more thing aford, i'm not wanting to reinstall windows xp on the d drive but only want it for available space...should i still follow the guide below? just checked computer management and it shows as follows
c drive healthy (boot, page file, crash dump, logical drive) vista
d drive healthy (system, active, primary partition) xp home

the d drive is what im wanting to delete with the corrupted xp install, should i be concerned at all with it saying primary partition/active?



thanks for all the help especially dig and aford.
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April 6, 2010 2:25:31 PM

This is where I'm unsure of the true partitioning aford10, his original C: drive is being listed as the D: drive when booting to Vista, but I'm not sure if that is just for when he does boot to Vista. I suspect the current dual boot info is on what was the XP drive and if he formats that drive from Vista, he might be wiping out the ability to boot at all.
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April 6, 2010 2:35:22 PM

Do you get the dual boot prompt on startup, to choose XP or vista?

It is interesting that D is showing as active. Once you've backed up your data, boot off your Vista disc. When you see the menu to choose the partition, choose the XP one. Then on the next screen you should have the option to format just that partition, leaving the C partition in tact.

You will most likely have to do a windows repair on your vista installation after that. It's not a complete reinstall, but it will repair/replace any system/boot files that have gotten crossed.

Make sure you've backed up your data first! I'm not 100% sure why it's reading your D drive as an active system partition. It sounds like the XP partition wasn't too damaged, and vista is still seeing it that way.
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April 6, 2010 4:07:12 PM

Thanks aford10. We appreciate your assistance.
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April 6, 2010 4:15:42 PM

Happy to help
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April 7, 2010 3:47:50 PM

yes, im getting the dual boot prompt

ok ill do it this weekend. My bro needs to backup his data as well so i can't just go ahead and format just yet. I'll keep you guys posted though
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April 7, 2010 3:49:22 PM

Sounds good. Let us know how things turn out.
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!