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Fridge as a chassis cooling system

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March 4, 2008 8:22:21 AM

Hello again!

I had an idea on using a fridge as a case. I think it's a great idea, since it produce alot of icecold air around the components. Now, my idea was to cut out the side on the chassis, where you put the components on. And put it in the fridge/freezer. And maybe cut some holes in the front, and put some fans that can push out the air. And the fridge push cold air in. But I was thinking, does it get muggy in there? If so, isn't that dangerous for my hardware?
(Edit: A colleague at my work, said that it won't get muggy inside the fridge, if I keep it closed all the time. If I open the door, it'd can get muggy).
If not, I was thinking of setting a watercooling in the fridge where the freezer itself is. So it gets extra cold, and will cool down my components even more.
The noise? Yeah, it'll be really noisy, but I don't care 'bout that. Even though I'll set some Nexus DampTek Noise Absorption Material around the freezer/fridge inside (maybe outside too? If that helps).

Noise Reduction:
- DynaMat
DynaMat is actually for cars. But in great use for this too. Reduce vibration and noise.
- DampTek
This will reduce noise.

I will cover the walls inside with these materials. Maybe on the outside too?

Fans:
- Akasa Crystal 80mm LED Fan
Fan speed: 2500 RPM
Airflow: 28.76 CFM
Noiselevel: 27.45 dBA
- Akasa 120mm LED Fan
Fan speed: 1700 RPM
Airflow: 59.05 CFM
Noiselevel: 29.75 dBA
- Delta 120mm EFB1212SHE
Fan speed: 3700 RPM
Airflow: 141.96 CFM
Noiselevel: 52.5 dBA

I'm not using the fans for cooling, but to move the air around in the chassis. I'll be using between 7 to 10 fans for optimal airflow around the chassis. And some extra cooling?
Well, I'll put some fans on the heatsink though, for extra cooling.
My colleague said that I won't be needing to cut holes in the frontdoor and put some fans there to push the air out. The fridge itself will do the job.

The heatsink system:
Motherboard: Thermalright HR-05/IFX
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/chipset/hr05_ifx/product_chitset_cooler_hr05_ifx.htm
CPU: Thermalright Ultra-120 Extreme
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/cpu/u120ex/product_cpu_cooler_u120ex.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
VGA: Thermalright HR-03 GT
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/vga/hr03gt/product_vga_cooler_hr03gt.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
RAM: Thermalright HR-07 Duo
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/ram/hr07duo/product_ram_cooler_hr07duo.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
MOSFET: Thermalright HR-09 S/U (type 1)
http://www.thermalright.com/new_a_page/product_page/mosfet/product_mosfet_cooler_hr09.htm?art=MTQyMywxLCxoZW50aHVzaWFzdA==
I don't know if I'll be using only heatsinks, or a combo of watercooling and heatsinks. Maybe you guys got experience enough to tell me what would be best to use. My opinion is to use heatsink only. Since the cold air that flows around will cool down the heatsink even more. But when I'm thinking of to connecting the watercooler to the freezer, I'm thinking that would be even more efficient.

The watercooling system:
- Swiftech H20-220 Ultra + Water Cooling Kit http://www.xoxide.com/swiftech-h2o-apex-ultra-plus.html
If I'm gonna use the watercooling. Then it'll only cool down the CPU, VGA and maybe the MB? And use heatsinks on the rest. But I was thinking, maybe I can make the fridge itself cool down the watercooler, so I get icecold water and air!

Chassis:

Name: In-Win EAR-010
HxWxD: 415 x 190 x 445 mm
Case size: Mid Tower Chassis
Price: 58$

Fridge:

Name: Samsung SR-G118
HxWxD: 836 x 453 x 495 mm
Weight: 25 Kg
Energyclass: Class B
Noise: 36 dBA
Price: 289$

Freezer:

Name: Elto F11
HxWxD: 850 x 550 x 600 mm
Weight: 45 Kg
Energyclass: Class A
Noise: 45 dBA
Price: 386$

So what do you guys think about this solution for chassis cooling?

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 4, 2008 8:31:59 AM

Nuts, I Like it, let me know how it works out! Cant you just set your res in there and chill your coolant that way? Prolly need a double pump and semi-long hoses, but whats new??
Like I said, I Like the Idea, try it out and let me know!!

--Lupi!
March 4, 2008 8:39:34 AM

Lupiron said:
Nuts, I Like it, let me know how it works out! Cant you just set your res in there and chill your coolant that way? Prolly need a double pump and semi-long hoses, but whats new??
Like I said, I Like the Idea, try it out and let me know!!

--Lupi!


Yeah, I could do that. But if the watercooling was going through the freezer, so the water gets even more cold (if possible), then I'll try that.
I let you know when I'm finished. I'll post some pictures and explain in detail how I did it.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
Related resources
March 4, 2008 1:07:02 PM

to much internal condensation will occur, water and electrics don't mix eh
a b K Overclocking
March 4, 2008 1:21:45 PM

mstaxi said:
to much internal condensation will occur, water and electrics don't mix eh




Quoted For Truth



A slightly better idea may be to set up liquid cooling and put the radiators in the mini-fridge. But then (1) you'd still have condensation issues because outside air would condense on the cold coolant lines, collect and drip on your components. So you *will* have to devise some effective means of preventing that from happening. And (2) refrigerators are not designed to cool items which continuously and actively produce their own heat. You may (or may not) be able to get away with it, but know that your 'fridge will be forced to run harder than it's designed to.. (overclocked 'Fridge!?!?!)
March 4, 2008 3:28:00 PM

This is basically what a phase cooler is, just use that if you have too.
March 4, 2008 4:00:34 PM

This very config idea has been contemplated by many people numerous times over the years. But it is still a bad idea. The reason is that the compressor equipment ina refridgerator is not built to handle a constant source of heat. It is in fact built to cool something down that will stay cold. Not to cool something that will continuously dump heat into the fridge. It will work for a short time, but will fail quickly. And when it fails it just might cause your system to over heat and fail. I recommend if you want to go with something similar look at a Vapo-Chill case or cooling unit.

-ouch1
March 4, 2008 5:07:29 PM

I have to give you credit for your persistence.....

Condensation on the tubing would be no problem, you can get tubing with neoprene wrapped around it like the specialty tubing made by Swiftech. It comes wrapped in neoprene and smartcoils.

However, refrigerators/freezers aren't designed to run 24/7. You are still better off setting up a chiller system either by buying one already made or making one yourself with something like this:

http://www.overcool.com/Exec/product.asp?userid=9994259...

Then, there is phase change of course.....
March 4, 2008 9:55:33 PM

You may end up freezing the HD, losing all data.

Depending on how long you use the pc, the fridge won't last very long.

...what's wrong with plain old air-cooling?
March 5, 2008 5:53:55 AM

Scotteq said:
Quoted For Truth



A slightly better idea may be to set up liquid cooling and put the radiators in the mini-fridge. But then (1) you'd still have condensation issues because outside air would condense on the cold coolant lines, collect and drip on your components. So you *will* have to devise some effective means of preventing that from happening. And (2) refrigerators are not designed to cool items which continuously and actively produce their own heat. You may (or may not) be able to get away with it, but know that your 'fridge will be forced to run harder than it's designed to.. (overclocked 'Fridge!?!?!)


Haha, yeah, something like an "overclocked" fridge, but hey, I've been convinced from not doing this. I posted the same thread as this in another section. And everyone there convinced me NOT to try this. Even not for fun; joy-killers... :p 
But I still maybe try to do this, and maybe try to find a solution to make this work. I've got some friends who are high-skilled engineers, I can ask them to help me to find a solution for this.
IF there where a solution for this, I will begin case modding on it too. Make this chassis real special :) .

Kind regards,
Nymph.
March 5, 2008 6:08:27 AM

Evilonigiri said:
You may end up freezing the HD, losing all data.

Depending on how long you use the pc, the fridge won't last very long.

...what's wrong with plain old air-cooling?


Oh, okay.

Nothing wrong with the good ol' air cooling, it's just I want to try to have cooled air. But it's the damn condensation issue. BUT! It's possible to prevent the condensation, by having the fridge always sealed. I can only open the door, when everything is shut down. But how can I make the fridge handle 8 hrs constantly heat? It'll maybe handle 5-6 hrs, if modified. Maybe there is a solution for having air coming in and out, without any condensation problem. Like, modify the freezer inside the fridge, take it out, and just use it in a normal chassis. And make it cool the air with low humidity. But that'll maybe be some heavy, advanced engineering. Oh well, I keep my hope for a solution.

Kind regards,
Nymph.
a b K Overclocking
March 5, 2008 11:17:51 AM

xzec said:
Haha, yeah, something like an "overclocked" fridge, but hey, I've been convinced from not doing this. I posted the same thread as this in another section. And everyone there convinced me NOT to try this. Even not for fun; joy-killers... :p 
But I still maybe try to do this, and maybe try to find a solution to make this work. I've got some friends who are high-skilled engineers, I can ask them to help me to find a solution for this.
IF there where a solution for this, I will begin case modding on it too. Make this chassis real special :) .

Kind regards,
Nymph.




Nymph - Just to be clear: I'm not saying the idea isn't Cool (sic). Just that a Mini Fridge isn't the way to go about it. As pointed out above - A Vapo~Chill setup would be better for this particular application.



"DUUUUUDE!!!! YOU BOUGHT A...... Maytag!?!?!?!? :pt1cable:  :lol:  :pt1cable:  :lol:  :pt1cable:  :lol: 
March 5, 2008 7:47:53 PM

xzec said:
Oh, okay.

Nothing wrong with the good ol' air cooling, it's just I want to try to have cooled air. But it's the damn condensation issue. BUT! It's possible to prevent the condensation, by having the fridge always sealed. I can only open the door, when everything is shut down. But how can I make the fridge handle 8 hrs constantly heat? It'll maybe handle 5-6 hrs, if modified. Maybe there is a solution for having air coming in and out, without any condensation problem. Like, modify the freezer inside the fridge, take it out, and just use it in a normal chassis. And make it cool the air with low humidity. But that'll maybe be some heavy, advanced engineering. Oh well, I keep my hope for a solution.

Kind regards,
Nymph.


If you open the door and let ambient air in it will condense on anything below the dew point.

Closing it and running the fridge will dehumidify and lower the dew point below the ambient temperature within the fridge.

The main issue I see is heat load. Fridge's are not designed to deal with a constant heat load inside. Just buying a fridge and making it work might NOT work. It might not be able to keep up and end up overheating the compressor, or any other number of issues.

As said, chiller or the likes.
March 6, 2008 5:14:45 AM

I use a small freezer for my mobo case. I cool a 50/50 antifreeze solution for my water block cooled by a seperate small air conditioner, the freezer runs at -10 c the air conditioner keeps the coolant at about the same temp. The condenser of the ac is emersed in the coolant. All the condensation occurs on the freezer coils which are isolated from the mobo. A 6" 24vdc fan handels the mobo to freezer heat transfer. Ive got all disks and the psu on top of the freezer so the only heat the freezer has to handle is the ram and graphics and mobo Chips the cpu is of course handled by the ac so with this distributed load neither the freezer or the ac run above a 50% duty cycle thus long life

any coments to jimep@hughes.net
March 6, 2008 2:50:48 PM

jimmmm said:
I use a small freezer for my mobo case. I cool a 50/50 antifreeze solution for my water block cooled by a seperate small air conditioner, the freezer runs at -10 c the air conditioner keeps the coolant at about the same temp. The condenser of the ac is emersed in the coolant. All the condensation occurs on the freezer coils which are isolated from the mobo. A 6" 24vdc fan handels the mobo to freezer heat transfer. Ive got all disks and the psu on top of the freezer so the only heat the freezer has to handle is the ram and graphics and mobo Chips the cpu is of course handled by the ac so with this distributed load neither the freezer or the ac run above a 50% duty cycle thus long life

any coments to jimep@hughes.net



The only question I have is how much did you pay for all of that. I bet it is either very close to, or more than the cost of a VapoChill unit.

-ouch1
March 7, 2008 2:05:38 AM

I had a friend who used a fridge as a cooler who froze his HD and finally the fridge broke down within half a year. Not worth it imo.
!