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How to check CPU stability?

Last response: in Overclocking
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March 7, 2008 6:03:49 AM

Yesterday I overclocked my Pentium 4 531 from 3ghz to 3.91ghz



i checked the temperature before overclocking, it was ~45 C and after overclock it was the same, tried to run Crysis and STALKER, and while playing i checked temperature, max was ~51 C.

I ran copies of some "Stress Prime 2004" and with it it took max ~62 C on CPU....

and it seems everything work stable, with my *****y graphics card 7300LE on lowest graphics FPS after overclock was increased from 15 to 27-30.

Overal it seems everything is working very stable, but my ask is what kind of software you recommend to check is my CPU really stable at 3.91 GHz ? :) 

More about : check cpu stability

a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
March 7, 2008 7:05:17 AM

ORTHOS
PRIME 95
OCCT
SUPER PI
March 12, 2008 5:15:40 PM

Maziar said:
ORTHOS
PRIME 95
OCCT
SUPER PI


In detail you should be able to run Prime 95 FFT's for at Least 8 hours, Blend test for 12.
For fun you can run memtest86+ for 12 hours to see if your memory is good too...that is if you pass a FFT but fail Blend.
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March 12, 2008 8:48:54 PM

Actually, you're supposed to run Blend first, dropping the multiplier of the cpu by one. Then after 12hours you run FFTs for 8hours with the multiplier back up.

This way if the memory is unstable, it doesn't end up failing the FFTs, giving the false impression that the cpu is unstable.
March 13, 2008 3:46:11 PM

Evilonigiri said:
Actually, you're supposed to run Blend first, dropping the multiplier of the cpu by one. Then after 12hours you run FFTs for 8hours with the multiplier back up.

This way if the memory is unstable, it doesn't end up failing the FFTs, giving the false impression that the cpu is unstable.


^
|
..yea, what he said | :sol: 
March 13, 2008 11:13:38 PM

I had to learn it the hard way. :( 

Experience is priceless, trust me.
March 19, 2008 9:24:42 PM

Evilonigiri said:
Actually, you're supposed to run Blend first, dropping the multiplier of the cpu by one. Then after 12hours you run FFTs for 8hours with the multiplier back up.

This way if the memory is unstable, it doesn't end up failing the FFTs, giving the false impression that the cpu is unstable.


Woah, I read the OC sticked guide and it didn't say anything about running blend tests. Can you provide more detail?

I've got my memory at 1:1 ratio which actually underclocks it a bit. Should I be worried about it being stable?
March 20, 2008 12:58:18 AM

billiardicus said:
Woah, I read the OC sticked guide and it didn't say anything about running blend tests. Can you provide more detail?

I've got my memory at 1:1 ratio which actually underclocks it a bit. Should I be worried about it being stable?

Interesting. Upon closer look, there isn't any reference to blend test, unless I missed it...I'll need to talk to graysky on this one.

Basically, blend test is to stress test your ram. If an error appears, it's most likely due to the ram, however it could also be due to the motherboard. Then you would have to change the settings around to get it stable. Also, an error can appear due to cpu instability, so that's why you want to lower the cpu multiplier by one or more and set the vcore to something you know is stable on (ex: 9x400 = 3.6GHz ---> 8x400 = 3.2GHz stable vcore at 1.4V). That way you can eliminate some variables.

Then you run blend test for a recommended 12hours, more the better. If the specified ram setting is 4-4-4-12 800MHz at 2.1v and you want to use those settings, it's usually rock stable so their is no point in stress testing, although in my case it went wrong. Anyways, you change the ram settings around to your liking, the test away. If an error appears and the fsb is lower than 350MHz, it's probably due to your ram. If you haven't touched your Mobo voltages and your fsb is greater than 350MHz, it could be NB, SB, fsb, or ram that's causing the issues. You'll have to pin point it yourself.

If you haven't experienced any instabilities, you're probably fine.
March 20, 2008 2:15:37 PM

Okay. So far I've only ran small FFT's. I can get a failure in 3 ways:
1. Error (I've always assumed it's the processor.
2. Crash (again I assume processor)
3. TM2 (Thermal Monitoring) kicks in. This lowers the multiplier to 6x when the "CPU gets too hot." Seems to kick in after 65C. Not sure why since the chip is rated higher than that, but I want to stay under 65C anyway.

My memory specs a 2.2v (so I set the mobo to +4). At 1:1 ratio, it's only at 711mhz so I figure it should be okay....

How do you tell if it's the NB, SB, etc?
March 20, 2008 10:37:24 PM

Well, you set the ram to a setting that you know is stable. There are other ways, but this is the safest and easiest.
!