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Broken AGP Port, or defective card? (GeForce FX5700)

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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November 19, 2007 3:49:08 AM

I recently got a few new games for which my graphics card was woefully obsolete, so I was going to replace it. However, I didn't know what model it was, so I took it out to read any of the little stickers telling me what it was, but being a newbie I didn't realize there was a clip keeping it in place. I sort of yanked it a few times before I noticed the clip, then took it out like I was supposed I put it back, hooked everything back up. I turned the computer on and heard a pop, followed by that burning-microchip smell. Then, even though the computer and hard drives sounded like they booted normally, my monitor still had the "Please Check Signal" screen. I didn't see any marks, burn or otherwise, on the connectors of the card. So that's as far as I know is that the graphics card is at fault.

I ordered a 128MB PNY GeForce FX-5700 from Compuvest.us. It arrived, I installed it and turned the computer on. When I pushed the power button I saw the card's fan jerk back, but it didn't start spinning, even though the rest of the computer seemed to start normally (I kept the side panel off to make sure it worked). I sent it back as defective, and they tested it as such, and sent me another one.

The second one they sent me was much better packaged, marked as fragile and bundled up in bubble wrap and foam. So, I installed it, and turned the computer on--- same thing happened. Fan doesn't even twitch, but the rest of the computer starts normally (?). I get the "Please Check Signal" thing again.

So my question is, what's at fault? Did I get another defective card, even though it was much better packaged and allegedly tested as working? Or did I mess up my motherboard's AGP slot when I yanked the old card out with the clip still in place?

Thanks for any advice.
a b U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 4:01:27 AM

thisis200 said:
I recently got a few new games for which my graphics card was woefully obsolete, so I was going to replace it. However, I didn't know what model it was, so I took it out to read any of the little stickers telling me what it was, but being a newbie I didn't realize there was a clip keeping it in place. I sort of yanked it a few times before I noticed the clip, then took it out like I was supposed I put it back, hooked everything back up. I turned the computer on and heard a pop, followed by that burning-microchip smell. Then, even though the computer and hard drives sounded like they booted normally, my monitor still had the "Please Check Signal" screen. I didn't see any marks, burn or otherwise, on the connectors of the card. So that's as far as I know is that the graphics card is at fault.

I ordered a 128MB PNY GeForce FX-5700 from Compuvest.us. It arrived, I installed it and turned the computer on. When I pushed the power button I saw the card's fan jerk back, but it didn't start spinning, even though the rest of the computer seemed to start normally (I kept the side panel off to make sure it worked). I sent it back as defective, and they tested it as such, and sent me another one.

The second one they sent me was much better packaged, marked as fragile and bundled up in bubble wrap and foam. So, I installed it, and turned the computer on--- same thing happened. Fan doesn't even twitch, but the rest of the computer starts normally (?). I get the "Please Check Signal" thing again.

So my question is, what's at fault? Did I get another defective card, even though it was much better packaged and allegedly tested as working? Or did I mess up my motherboard's AGP slot when I yanked the old card out with the clip still in place?

Thanks for any advice.


Quote:
I turned the computer on and heard a pop, followed by that burning-microchip smell.


Sounds (and smells) like you burned your MB and possibly even more components of your system. Look around your MB and see if you see any brown burn marks on the board. If so, your board has been rendered to nothing more than 'paper weigh quality' if it's burned. As far as new video card (old one too), CPU, HD, RAM, PSU, etc., you will need a working system with a good MB to test the individual components for damage.
November 19, 2007 4:17:09 AM

Hi Badge,
I went in with my handy penlight to look for any physical damage. I didn't see anything, but I went back to my laptop to sniff around for more info. It seems that my new card is AGP 8x, whereas my MB and old graphics card are probably 4x. I don't know if that has any bearing, but I don't think that's the cause of the exploding, since even when I plug the old card in I don't get a signal. My CPU, HD, RAM, PSU, OMGWTFBBQ are all in good condition (borrowed a friend's test comp), so it probably is the mobo.

I think what happened is that I knocked some AGP port pins out of alignment when I tried to get the old card out, and when I turned it on the misdirected electricity did something weird to both the card and the slot. And now I can't use any cards in the slot, regardless of whether they're AGP 4x or 8x.

Does that seem plausable?
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a b U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 4:23:08 AM

Your AGP 8x card is lkely a 4x/8x (5700 are as far as I know) so the MB 4X AGP slot should not 'fail' because of the replacement. If the smoke of smell came from the MB, it is likely damaged. If you swapped out your other components and they tested fine, then you are fortunate there. If that's the case, sounds like you need a new MB. When you jerked on the old card while removing it, you may have dislodged the AGP slot from the MB. Thus the smoke, smell and demise of the board.
November 19, 2007 4:32:23 AM

Thanks for the help!

You've confirmed my suspicions, so with any luck a new MB will fix this right up and I can finally start playing those games.
!