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What is the best AGP 8X VGA card ever on the market now ???

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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November 19, 2007 6:42:55 PM

Hi

I'm looking for the best AGP 8X card on the market can play all H.264 1080p files smoothly

please

More about : agp vga card market

a c 1399 U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 6:57:33 PM

Ati 2600XT directX 10 and ati 1950pro directX 9
November 19, 2007 7:06:22 PM

is Diamond Viper ATI X1950PRO AGP 512MB will work perfectly
and thanks
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November 19, 2007 7:15:03 PM

olololol said:
is Diamond Viper ATI X1950PRO AGP 512MB will work perfectly
and thanks

November 19, 2007 7:16:21 PM

Not sure the H.264 drivers work on AGP cards.

Also, H.264 is only fully accelerated on the 2600 XT, won't be fully accelerated on the X1950 PRO... assuming the drivers DO work.
a c 1399 U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 9:24:28 PM

If You reed the page in the link they state that it is H.264 accelerated so does Sapphire with their AGP 1950pro
November 19, 2007 9:32:01 PM

Wait until you have enough for a PCIe motherboard and a PCIe GPU. Otherwise you're totally wasting your money.
a b U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 9:55:52 PM

rolli59 said:
If You reed the page in the link they state that it is H.264 accelerated so does Sapphire with their AGP 1950pro



I can read HIS' copy on their PR description, however I don't belive it's capable of fluid high bit rate 1080P H.264 decoding the way the HD2600 is capable of.

And like Cleeve mentioned, right now the driver support for the H.264 decoding UVD component is questionable.
a b U Graphics card
November 19, 2007 10:01:00 PM

jjblanche said:
Wait until you have enough for a PCIe motherboard and a PCIe GPU. Otherwise you're totally wasting your money.



I agree with that sentiment, but it does depend on his CPU as to whether it's worth it.

If he wants to add it to an older CPU it'll be pretty costly to upgrade the mobo and CPU for just video playback.

For the price of those AGP models he should be able to get an HD3850 with a little extra coin left over, but the question is what else is needed after that.
November 19, 2007 10:05:51 PM

Saphire ATI HD3850 256mb
November 19, 2007 11:19:06 PM

In my opinion, there comes a time where a system needs to be scrapped. Adding that card to what you currently have is really not going to be that much of a great benefit.

Do yourself a big favor, save up like $500, and blow the doors off what you currently have. That's really the only solution I can see. You can get a PCIe mobo for $50-60, a 3850 for $180, a 5000+ Black Edition for $130, and 2 Gig RAM for another $60. That's a shade over $400. Add the hard drive and case you already have, and, magically, you have a current system!

Going with an AGP card at this point in the tech game is like buying a car with a carburetor.
a b U Graphics card
November 20, 2007 12:33:24 AM

Yes, at least the HD3850 is coming to AGP, the HD3870 not so certain.

As for the X1950XT it's great for gaming, but as the question was regarding HD 1080P H.264 playback, the X1950XT doesn't offer much more over the X1950Pro.
November 20, 2007 1:27:15 AM

Omg AGP fever.
November 20, 2007 6:50:44 PM

Many Thanks for you all :D 

I don't want change my pc ,its good for watching movies except 1080P :fou: 

I think i will wait for ATI HD3850.

December 31, 2007 7:07:30 PM

Coming out in January, pending driver release
December 31, 2007 10:10:30 PM

Yup theres a fudo article its a 3850 PCS 512mb.
a b U Graphics card
December 31, 2007 10:18:12 PM

Yeah but the UVD support is still lacking sofar in AGP, so it's still a toss-up for that original question of 1080P content.
December 31, 2007 11:22:45 PM

jjblanche said:
Wait until you have enough for a PCIe motherboard and a PCIe GPU. Otherwise you're totally wasting your money.


I agree with that. I put an X1650 Pro AGP in an old Northwood system to keep it going a bit longer and it died due to my using a cheap power supply out of a barebones (I'd replaced the barebones psu with a better Coolermaster). So, I have a fried motherboard and maybe CPU.

I got about six month's use out of the card, and though the card's under warranty, I won't build another AGP system. About all I can do is trade it in at ATI for a PCIe card. So, I'll wait till they eventually have an X2600 under their trade in program.

Save up money for a new motherboard and, if necessary CPU. I recommend that no one buy a last gasp AGP card unless they're stuck with a Dell or HP until they can afford a new PC.
January 1, 2008 1:03:58 AM

yipsl said:
I agree with that. I put an X1650 Pro AGP in an old Northwood system to keep it going a bit longer and it died due to my using a cheap power supply out of a barebones (I'd replaced the barebones psu with a better Coolermaster). So, I have a fried motherboard and maybe CPU.

I got about six month's use out of the card, and though the card's under warranty, I won't build another AGP system. About all I can do is trade it in at ATI for a PCIe card. So, I'll wait till they eventually have an X2600 under their trade in program.

Save up money for a new motherboard and, if necessary CPU. I recommend that no one buy a last gasp AGP card unless they're stuck with a Dell or HP until they can afford a new PC.


I think the issue may be more complex. For many, yes, it is probably better to build a new PCIe system. For others it may be more efficient to simplly pop in an upgraded GPU. Each person has to examine available funds and the value-added use gained from any particular upgrade. Steam's surveys provide several interesting facts.

According to Steam's latest survey summary (December 29th, 2007), PCIe 4X/8X/16X comprise roughly 63% of the graphics cards, while AGP 4X/8X is down to about 31%. If these figures are representative of gamers' boxes as a whole, there are still hundreds of thousands of AGP motherboard owners out there that will take notice of the 3850. Another interesting statistic is that 76% of the Steam Survey respondents still use monitors with 4:3 aspect ratios, with 72% using resolutions of 1024x768 or 1280x960 - both well within the capabilities of a 3850 and acceptable for many of the latest games, except perhaps Crysis and for those enthusiasts that seek higher resolutions on widescreen LCDs. For those who choose to upgrade their existing AGP card, it's just a matter of plugging a new gpu in (provided an acceptable power supply is available) - no reloading operating systems, programs, files, having to re-enter product keys, and installing drivers for other system hardware parts, or incurring the additional expenses for a new motherboard, memory, etc. Thus for some, AGP is still a viable option, particularly if funds and time are short, and/or they are trying to extend the useful lifetime of expensive 2 to 3 year old parts.

And it makes no difference what you have now, 6 months or a year from now, your new parts will be worth less than half what you paid for them, and thus a new cycle begins anew. And the X38 or X48 afficionadoes will be chiding those who simply want to "upgrade" their existing P35 and PCIe 1.0 and 1.2 systems. What goes around, comes around. Ultimately, it comes down to your own personal finances, what you can afford, and your own personal philosphy about value, money, and what you are willing to spend to stay close to, or at the "bleeding edge" of technology.


January 1, 2008 1:55:32 AM

AGP will never die! AGP forever! MUahahahahaha.
!