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64 Bit Windows XP question

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April 9, 2010 9:31:21 PM

I need to replace the hard drive in my windows xp machine. Can I install the 64 bit version using a 32 bit key or is the key specific to the version? The reason I ask is I would like to order another 2gb of ram. If not I guess I am stuck at 2gb. I thought I would check if anyone knows if this is possible.

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April 9, 2010 9:33:15 PM

The key is unique to the installation CD, they must match.
April 11, 2010 5:54:20 PM

With XP, they were two completely different OSes... so a 32-bit Pro key would not work for 64-bit Pro. Even with Vista and Win 7, you have to purchase a retail copy to get a key that will work with both 32 and 64-bit... OEM keys are tied to 32-bit or 64-bit installations.
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April 11, 2010 6:19:02 PM

Quote:
With XP, they were two completely different OSes... so a 32-bit Pro key would not work for 64-bit Pro.


With XP, the key must match the installation CD.

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Even with Vista and Win 7, you have to purchase a retail copy to get a key that will work with both 32 and 64-bit... OEM keys are tied to 32-bit or 64-bit installations.


As with XP, stand alone OEM instalation disks require a matching activation key. VLK's the various system builders may use may work differently
April 11, 2010 9:04:55 PM

Are we going to go through this again, Badge? :p 

Any generic OEM CD can be used to install Windows XP so long as the versions match (Home, Pro, Media Center, etc). Manufacturer specific discs can only be used on other machines from the same manufacturer. However, using the product key that came with you computer, you can use a generic OEM disc to reinstall Windows... you just have to make sure your sticker matches the version of Windows XP that you have.
April 11, 2010 9:11:27 PM

Zoron said:
Are we going to go through this again, Badge? :p 

Any generic OEM CD can be used to install Windows XP so long as the versions match (Home, Pro, Media Center, etc). Manufacturer specific discs can only be used on other machines from the same manufacturer. However, using the product key that came with you computer, you can use a generic OEM disc to reinstall Windows... you just have to make sure your sticker matches the version of Windows XP that you have.


Would you please provide a link documenting this. I have asked you for a link before. You ignored it. You are wrong this time Zoron. Otherwise, please provide documentation. Otherwise, stop trying to correct me when you don't know what you are talking about. Same with SSD's. Stop correcting people on this forum when when you don't know what you are talking about.
April 11, 2010 9:16:42 PM

Zoron said:
Are we going to go through this again, Badge? :p 

Any generic OEM CD can be used to install Windows XP so long as the versions match (Home, Pro, Media Center, etc). Manufacturer specific discs can only be used on other machines from the same manufacturer. However, using the product key that came with you computer, you can use a generic OEM disc to reinstall Windows... you just have to make sure your sticker matches the version of Windows XP that you have.


There is a misunderstaning. I do not have a computer with a sticker on it as you infer. I have stand alone OEM versions of my operating systems which come with a unique activation key relative to that particular disk. The installation disk must match the activation key. Read my post. Quote:

VLK's the various system builders may use may work different

We are apparently talking about apples and oranges, yet you continue to float around and try to correct me when you do not know what you are referring to. I can not use your keys to install my stand alone OEM installation disks. The key must match the disk. You may be referring to installing the DVD, skipping entering a key then purchasing a key from MS at some point. Apples and oranges.
April 11, 2010 10:26:49 PM

No, that is most certainly not what I'm referring to...

I have a generic OEM Windows XP Home and Pro. I can use these discs to install Windows XP on any computer I wish... provided they have a product key on the case. I do not need to provide a link, as I do this on an almost daily basis. They are NOT VLKs, they are GENERIC (not manufacturer CDs) OEM CDs. There is nothing stating that your key must match your disc. In fact, manufacturer specific versions don't require you to enter a key.

ANY Windows XP Pro OEM product key can be used with ANY Windows XP Pro disc. You don't need to hunt down the disc that came with your computer. I'm not sure where you got the information from, Badge, but again I know this is the case because I have to reload computers on an almost daily basis and not everyone has their discs available. I have Windows XP Pro and Home OEM ISOs on my computer that I use to create discs at will. I can then take these discs and use them on any computer that has an OEM product key on the side. (or whereever). The discs have never been and never will be tied to a specific product key.

Edit: Just to be clear, VLK media will not accept OEM keys... they MUST be VLK keys. OEM discs require OEM keys and retail discs require retail keys. They can be any VLK disc, OEM disc or retail disc. Maybe this is where you're getting confused... the type of key must match the type of disc... but any key of the same type will be accepted by any disc of the same type.
April 11, 2010 11:03:10 PM

Quote:
I have a generic OEM Windows XP Home and Pro. I can use these discs to install Windows XP on any computer I wish


I have eight windows XP OEM installation CDs curently. I have tried installing the CD, then using one of the other keys and it does not work. Now, MS has grown a lot in this area over the years. I have not tried this in probably four years or maybe even five, six years. I may try it again if I have time.

Quote:
I do not need to provide a link, as I do this on an almost daily basis. They are NOT VLKs, they are GENERIC (not manufacturer CDs) OEM CDs. There is nothing stating that your key must match your disc. In fact, manufacturer specific versions don't require you to enter a key.


Like I said before. You refuse to provode a link, so you could have dreamed this as far as I know.

Quote:
ANY Windows XP Pro OEM product key can be used with ANY Windows XP Pro disc. You don't need to hunt down the disc that came with your computer.


I keep telling you, a XP disk did not come with my computer. I bought my OEM disks fro Fry's and Newegg. The individual product keys are not interchangeable on my disks. I have tried and the keys are not interchangeable.

Quote:
Edit: Just to be clear, VLK media will not accept OEM keys... they MUST be VLK keys.


What are you saying?

Quote:
quote:
Any generic OEM CD can be used to install Windows XP so long as the versions match (Home, Pro, Media Center, etc).


Note. I don't think you know as much on this subject of using product keys with any XP disk as you put on you do. I have asked for links agaain and again and you will not post supporting links instead stating, "I don't have to because I know better."


Quote:
OEM discs require OEM keys and retail discs require retail keys. They can be any VLK disc, OEM disc or retail disc. Maybe this is where you're getting confused... the type of key must match the type of disc... but any key of the same type will be accepted by any disc of the same type.


Well, this 'concept' has not worked with my installation CDs. Ms has grown up a lot in this area. Perhaps, but I would like to see supporting links from MS clarifying the idea of product activation keys and their capabilities.

April 11, 2010 11:17:51 PM

I don't have links. If you refuse to believe me, you'll have to come watch me reload a computer sometime. The OEM disc you bought is a "generic" OEM disc... it's not tied to any specific computer manufacturer. Now, using this "generic" OEM disc, you can reinstall Windows on any computer that has the appropriate (Home, Pro, Media Center) product key. Tust me, Badge, if it didn't work, no ones computer would ever get reloaded when it needed because hardly anyone brings their discs in with their computer.

Will someone else here PLEASE back me up on this? I know I'm not the only person that has had to reload Windows without access to the disc the computer was originally purchased with / came with. Either Badge isn't understanding what I'm trying to say, or he's being obtuse on purpose. :p 

It is impossible for MS to tie a single product key to a single disc. Do you realize what kind of backlash there would be if they did? ANY GENERIC OEM DISC WILL WORK WITH ANY OEM PRODUCT KEY. The keys must match the version of course. Pro with Pro keys, Home with Home keys, Media Center with Media Center keys and X64 with X64 keys. You also cannot use a retail disc with an OEM key... it will NOT work. Again, I have done this so I know.
April 11, 2010 11:30:15 PM

Besides, if a specific disc was tied to a specific key, it would be almost impossible to provide replacement media without a replacement key. Since you can use replacement media with the same key... then that should tell you right there that your Windows XP Pro (or Home or whatever the hell you have) OEM disc can be used to reinstall Windows XP Pro on ANY computer that has an OEM product key.
April 11, 2010 11:31:10 PM

Zoron said:
I don't have links. If you refuse to believe me, you'll have to come watch me reload a computer sometime. The OEM disc you bought is a "generic" OEM disc... it's not tied to any specific computer manufacturer. Now, using this "generic" OEM disc, you can reinstall Windows on any computer that has the appropriate (Home, Pro, Media Center) product key. Tust me, Badge, if it didn't work, no ones computer would ever get reloaded when it needed because hardly anyone brings their discs in with their computer.

Will someone else here PLEASE back me up on this? I know I'm not the only person that has had to reload Windows without access to the disc the computer was originally purchased with / came with. Either Badge isn't understanding what I'm trying to say, or he's being obtuse on purpose. :p 

It is impossible for MS to tie a single product key to a single disc. Do you realize what kind of backlash there would be if they did? ANY GENERIC OEM DISC WILL WORK WITH ANY OEM PRODUCT KEY. The keys must match the version of course. Pro with Pro keys, Home with Home keys, Media Center with Media Center keys and X64 with X64 keys. You also cannot use a retail disc with an OEM key... it will NOT work. Again, I have done this so I know.


Quote:
you can reinstall Windows on any computer that has the appropriate (Home, Pro, Media Center) product key


I can install my CD with it's product ID key, but I can not install my CD and use any other product key.

Quote:
Will someone else here PLEASE back me up on this? I know I'm not the only person that has had to reload Windows without access to the disc the computer was originally purchased with / came with


Sure if you have a DELL prebuilt and a workable DELL installation CD, the DELL key will work. I think we are back to apples and oranges here. You are talking about one thing, and I am talking about another. Your computer with a DELL product ID will not be compatible with my stand alone installation CD.

Quote:
It is impossible for MS to tie a single product key to a single disc. Do you realize what kind of backlash there would be if they did?


Where did you dream this up? Of couurse MS has this capability. In fact, Ms has the capability to deactivate your VISTA product id key when you use an upgrade from that Vista installation to Windows 7. See what I mean. You make statements that you "just know" and don't have to backup. I don't understand how you think like that. You are wrong Zoron.
April 11, 2010 11:35:30 PM

Quote:
Besides, if a specific disc was tied to a specific key, it would be almost impossible to provide replacement media without a replacement key.


I have had MS repalce an installation CD before. The company just sent out a new CD with unique key. Again.


Quote:
Since you can use replacement media with the same key... then that should tell you right there that your Windows XP Pro (or Home or whatever the hell you have) OEM disc can be used to reinstall Windows XP Pro on ANY computer that has an OEM product key.


You are saying any OEM installation disk will work with any product key as long as the version matches. I just explained how MS issues replacement install disks. When you said it's not possible for MS to do. MS has come a long way in recent years regarding Product keys and activation and such. I am sure things were different in the past.
April 11, 2010 11:42:56 PM

And I'm saying I use a single OEM disc to reinstall Windows on HUNDREDS of computers. Would you care to enlighten me as to how this is possible if your scenario is true?
April 11, 2010 11:48:25 PM

Zoron said:
And I'm saying I use a single OEM disc to reinstall Windows on HUNDREDS of computers. Would you care to enlighten me as to how this is possible if your scenario is true?


Quote:
It is impossible for MS to tie a single product key to a single disc


MS has the capaaility to disable the product Id key on any of one or on all the 100 computers if they wish.

Well, my installation CDs, the ones I have tried this with, do not have SP1. So I am thinking perhaps this could be a reason I can not mix and match the product ID keys with the disks. I don't know.
April 11, 2010 11:52:25 PM

I want to add, I have changed the product key in the registry through command prompts. So, I know there are ways. But, I can not mix and match the Product ID Keys and my installation CD's and do a simple installation like you suggest. Again, MS has been very innovative in this area in recent years, so things have no doubt changed regarding, Product ID, activation, OEM licensing, etc.
April 12, 2010 12:01:08 AM

I use a single Pro or Home OEM ISO image with SP2 slipstreamed into the installation... eventually, I'll get around to creating SP3 ISOs. I create a disc whenever I need one. I take this disc, reload the defective computer, and use the product key that is attached to the customer's computer. I then successfully activate Windows after reloading. This scenario has played out hundreds of times and has never failed. The only time it did was when I was accidentally using a Pro disc on a computer with a Home product key. If what you suggest is true, then I should not be able to do this and yet I do. Daily.

There is simply no way MS had tied a specific product key to a specific disc.
April 12, 2010 12:08:00 AM

I believe 'ya Zoron. I have not been successful mixing and matching my Product IDs and installation disks. I will try this with my early XP installation disks. I have only one OEM copy of Windows XP Pro SP2. I have at least 5 or 6 or more XP Home Edition OEM installation disks I purchased. I have multiple slipstreamed copies for my office systems. It would be easy to hook up a HD and run the installation CD and then enter a product ID key from another disk. I will do so when I have a few minutes. My wife asked that I move a computer out of the midddle of the floor in the other room. It's been there for a month, so when I move it later I'll try the XP installation. Load it up and when prompted enter the Product ID key from one of the other installation CDs.
April 12, 2010 4:56:33 AM

Ok Zoron it worked. You are correct and I learned something. I used an OEM XP Home Edition with SP1 installation CD and loaded it onto the hard drive, formatted and installed the XP OS. When prompted for the product ID key, I entered the 'key' from a different OEM XP Home Edition installation CD. It loaded to desktop. I didn't activate it.

I have tried this in the past. I believe I was loading up my only copy of OEM XP Professional SP2 and then trying to enter the key from a OEM Home edition disk. Thanks for pointing this out.
May 16, 2010 7:31:26 PM

badge said:
Ok Zoron it worked. You are correct and I learned something. I used an OEM XP Home Edition with SP1 installation CD and loaded it onto the hard drive, formatted and installed the XP OS. When prompted for the product ID key, I entered the 'key' from a different OEM XP Home Edition installation CD. It loaded to desktop. I didn't activate it.

I have tried this in the past. I believe I was loading up my only copy of OEM XP Professional SP2 and then trying to enter the key from a OEM Home edition disk. Thanks for pointing this out.

Excuse me for butting into an arguement between Zoron and Badge. I read thru their statements and replies and might say something. I think they are both right, but Badge might be missing the point. You cannot use just any key code, it must be the key code that comes with the computer your reinstalling. I have did this and it works.

lacroos
May 16, 2010 8:50:53 PM

lacroos_22 said:
Excuse me for butting into an arguement between Zoron and Badge. I read thru their statements and replies and might say something. I think they are both right, but Badge might be missing the point. You cannot use just any key code, it must be the key code that comes with the computer your reinstalling. I have did this and it works.

lacroos


Irrelevant to this conversation. The key codes I have are from OEM copies of Windows XP I purchased seperately from any computer. I have five or six OEM copies of XP I have purchased and own, each disk with it's own key code. The five different OEM key codes will work with ANY XP OEM disk including any OEM XP disk Microsoft has released. The instalation is tied to the key code, not to a specific OEM disk. That is what I learned from Zoron which I was not aware of before.
May 17, 2010 7:43:53 PM

Yes, you were getting confused with what I was saying... Home OEM keys only work with Home OEM discs. (For example). You can use any Home OEM disc, but it MUST be Home OEM to work with the key... a Home Retail disc wouldn't work. Same thing applies to Pro / Ultimate / whatever other versions of Windows. The keys aren't tied to specific discs... just specific TYPES of discs. Glad you understand now what I meant, badge.
May 17, 2010 7:49:40 PM

Yeah, I didn't make that clear in my last post. But I got it. Thanks again.
November 10, 2012 9:05:39 PM

Zoron said:
And I'm saying I use a single OEM disc to reinstall Windows on HUNDREDS of computers. Would you care to enlighten me as to how this is possible if your scenario is true?

I do it all the time. This week I used a Desktop Gateway Vista Home Premium 32bit disc to reload Vista Home Premium 32bit on a non Gateway Vista Home Premium 32bit Laptop. Put in the Laptop Vista Home Premium 32bit tag key and it did give me COA on activation.
I also used a Generic Vista Home Basic 32bit bootable disc made from a .iso file (Nero 7 Ultimate) to reload the OS to a Dell Slim 530s with Vista home Basic 32bit and used it's Vista Home Basic 32bit key from the tag and it gave me COA on activation too. I always match the OS system to the MS tag on the machine. I have several .iso's and disc's made from them. It's never failed me. I do have to fix a couple of drivers but that's about all.
November 17, 2012 8:35:55 PM

Gamerx07 said:
I need to replace the hard drive in my windows xp machine. Can I install the 64 bit version using a 32 bit key or is the key specific to the version? The reason I ask is I would like to order another 2gb of ram. If not I guess I am stuck at 2gb. I thought I would check if anyone knows if this is possible.
the HDD has nothing to do with ram & I think u can put 4GB in ok ;) 
December 3, 2012 7:07:05 PM

Zoron said:
I use a single Pro or Home OEM ISO image with SP2 slipstreamed into the installation... eventually, I'll get around to creating SP3 ISOs. I create a disc whenever I need one. I take this disc, reload the defective computer, and use the product key that is attached to the customer's computer. I then successfully activate Windows after reloading. This scenario has played out hundreds of times and has never failed. The only time it did was when I was accidentally using a Pro disc on a computer with a Home product key. If what you suggest is true, then I should not be able to do this and yet I do. Daily.

There is simply no way MS had tied a specific product key to a specific disc.


Used nlite to slipstream a windows xp home oem sp0 disk into xp home oem sp3, although doesn't recommend entering a serial key in case the disk needs to be used on another pc. Not that you didn't already know, although others may read this. Hasn't had any luck with vlite, yet.
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