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IP address conflict with another system on network

Last response: in Windows XP
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April 11, 2010 4:37:32 PM

i have this error "IP address conflict with another system on network" on widnows xp and my internet is not working but it's working well on ubuntu. so i think it is a problem in windows XP. after repairing my connection internet starts working but only for a wile. help me plz. thanks in advance.
April 11, 2010 4:55:50 PM

Sounds like your router is misassigning IP addresses and should be turned off for a minute and then turned back on, or you have a mix of DHCP dynamic IP addresses and some static IP addresses that the router does not control.

For instance, if the assignable IP address range set up in your router (or possibily server if a business network) is 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150 then the router will hand out IP addresses to each computer on your network so that they are uniquely identified on the network. If one of your computers, photocopiers, or printers is maunally set to use 192.168.1.105 (an IP address inside the scope of your Router's DHCP IP pool of addresses, then the router would assign the 192.168.1.105 without knowing it is already in use and this would cause the conflict. Static IP addresses should always be assigned outside of the scope of the DHCP IP pool.

These are the two most likely causes of your problem.

Let me know if the problem persists after restarting your router.

How many computers/devices on your network and do you have access to check the settings on each of them?

Cheers!
April 11, 2010 10:29:35 PM

Not necessarily outside of the scope... but at the very least, the router has to be told that a certain device (identified by MAC address) is using a static address and not to try to assign that address to another device. Most routers will allow you to set up static addresses for any device you want.
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April 12, 2010 2:50:31 AM

True Zoron. As long as the router (or server) is made aware of the static IP's in use a conflict should not happen. Some of the basic home routers don't seem to allow for exclusions within the DHCP pool though.
April 14, 2010 12:38:32 PM

I hope you can provide us with more info if how many computers are there in your network. Most probably it is and your IP is shared to another user or maybe another user is just hijacking your IP (which is assigned to your PC) so he or she can have full internet access.
April 16, 2010 9:56:09 PM

hello,

yes , if your two computer is using same ip Address so it's conflict , so use different ip address in your network . so,again it's not conflict.



regards,

purushottamaher

From- ESDS Software Solution
http://www.esds.co.in.
April 17, 2010 3:53:52 AM

The situation the original poster presented tells us all we need to know. There is a device on the network that has a static IP set. This static IP is likely within the DHCP scope of the router and because the router doesn't know there is a device using that address, it tries to assign that same address to another computer that is set to use DHCP. It's a simple matter of either setting all network devices to DHCP and refreshing the IP or configuring the router to allow that static address.
April 17, 2010 4:09:44 AM

It has been 6 days since his post and no reply back, he either forgot his forum password or found his solution I think! :) 
October 30, 2012 2:01:07 AM

Zoron said:
The situation the original poster presented tells us all we need to know. There is a device on the network that has a static IP set. This static IP is likely within the DHCP scope of the router and because the router doesn't know there is a device using that address, it tries to assign that same address to another computer that is set to use DHCP. It's a simple matter of either setting all network devices to DHCP and refreshing the IP or configuring the router to allow that static address.



I'm having this same problem, but since you weren't answered by the original poster, there was no solution posted. I would need more detailed instructions. I have a computer, router, printer, and several wirelessly connected laptops in my home network. I was able to determine that the IP address on my printer is different than my computer. How do I determine the IP Address for the router? I see one printed on the bottom of it, but don't know how to confirm that it is still the current IP address.
December 19, 2012 4:20:48 PM

sabrinadjones said:
I'm having this same problem, but since you weren't answered by the original poster, there was no solution posted. I would need more detailed instructions. I have a computer, router, printer, and several wirelessly connected laptops in my home network. I was able to determine that the IP address on my printer is different than my computer. How do I determine the IP Address for the router? I see one printed on the bottom of it, but don't know how to confirm that it is still the current IP address.


Sabrina, you can type the IP address listed on your router into a web browser and if it brings up a page displaying a logon prompt for the brand of router you will know it is correct. If not, try going to the Start button and selecting Run. In the Run line type cmd and hit Enter. In the command prompt window type ipconfig /all and look for the Default Gateway: . . . . ip address This will be the address of the wireless router if you are connected with a wireless NIC and/or the address of the ethernet router if you are connected with a cable. You will likely be able to type this address into an internet browser and hit the configuration web page of your router, although a password may be required to login. Hope this helps.
!