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When is the best time to buy a graphic card?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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When is the best time to buy a graphic card?

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  • Now
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  • January
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  • Febuary
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  • March
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  • April
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November 25, 2007 4:46:33 AM

From what I understand it seems like January is the sweet spot when new cards are released?

What seems to be the trend so far?

I'm in no rush but looking for a $400 card that supports my 1080p 24 inch Samsung monitor for future gaming. (I mainly play RPG's)

So my question is when do you think the best time to jump on board is. I can probably wait tell April, until I feel the need to purchase my card.

Any news on R700 release date?

More about : time buy graphic card

November 25, 2007 4:56:04 AM

Wait until 9800GTX whenever that comes out...
November 25, 2007 6:05:40 AM

Quote:

So my question is when do you think the best time to jump on board is


When you can afford it.
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November 25, 2007 7:47:35 AM

I totally agree with itotallybelieveyou, my next upgrade with be a 9xxx series Nvidia or an 89xx Nvidia whichever comes first.
November 25, 2007 7:59:27 AM

I use this principle when I bought a new GPU: Wait until the lowest high end part reach $300 (for example in this generation I bought NVidia 8800GTS 320MB when the price for that part reaches $300) and skip one generation (Buy NVidia 7800 series but not 7900, because it's only a die shrink, I only buy new architecture). It just not economical for me to buy a $500 GPU, I only have a 19' LCD and I never use anti aliasing.
November 25, 2007 11:17:34 AM

In all honesty there's probably never a good time to buy a new card, seeing as price drops and new releases are always around the corner. However, you should never buy a card when its replacement is just around the corner: i.e. buying a 8800gtx or ultra when the new gts is coming in about 10 days, and the new gtx I would say sometime after that.
November 25, 2007 12:33:34 PM

i'm currently waiting patiently for the 8800gts g92, which i'm hoping will come out as previously mentioned, mid december. but from what i gather some of the people in this thread are saying, it would be better to wait for 9 series?

would the first 9 series card have a significant boost in performance over a g92 card? i can wait, but not for too long..i understand noone can really say for sure, but maybe reference can be taken from the upgrade from the upgrade to 8 series. i wasn't looking for a card then so i don't remember how it was back then
November 25, 2007 2:05:56 PM

When is the best time to buy a graphic card?

When your old card can no longer play the games you like at acceptable frame rates.
November 25, 2007 2:19:23 PM

athenaesword said:
i'm currently waiting patiently for the 8800gts g92, which i'm hoping will come out as previously mentioned, mid december. but from what i gather some of the people in this thread are saying, it would be better to wait for 9 series?

would the first 9 series card have a significant boost in performance over a g92 card? i can wait, but not for too long..i understand noone can really say for sure, but maybe reference can be taken from the upgrade from the upgrade to 8 series. i wasn't looking for a card then so i don't remember how it was back then


A G92 gts might be a good upgrade I would say, seeing as its supposed to have 128 stream processors, making it more or less a G80 gtx all things being equal. Going from a G80 gts to a G92 gts would be some jump I would think. Imagine what the G92 GTX would be like? 150 stream processors? (if one will ever come out). When the G92 line tops out and gets replaced by the G100, the top G92 could likely be playing crysis non-sli all highest DX10 at high res pretty well I should think.
November 25, 2007 2:51:07 PM

skittle said:
Quote:

So my question is when do you think the best time to jump on board is


When you can afford it.


Or When you need.

Since Prices are always dropping and new cards are always coming out............
November 25, 2007 4:20:26 PM

while it's fair to say in general prices go down and new cards come out there're still cards that are worth waiting for 1 or 2 weeks for the performance/price ratio that they deliver upon release. and some that just don't justify the cost. it's a fine line, but pretty important if u're looking for performance from a mid-high end card and don't wish to overspend.

does anyone know a more accurate point for the new gts? it's supposed to be between gt and gtx but which would it be closer to you guys think?
a c 130 U Graphics card
November 25, 2007 8:58:57 PM

Well l havent seen that many reviews but since the ones i have seen have got the GT running quite close to the GTX anyway then you would hope that the GTS can at least equal it.
I have no proof or any thing but i personally just going on what i would consider a worthwhile performance increase as far as bothering to bring out the GTS in the first place think that the GTS should be the first card to best the GTX.
Mactronix
November 25, 2007 9:12:38 PM

crabdog said:
When is the best time to buy a graphic card?

When your old card can no longer play the games you like at acceptable frame rates.


That is an awesome answer.
November 25, 2007 10:58:55 PM

See my other post, but unfortunately, prices are not dropping this time. The only seem to be going up up up (at least for the gold plated, diamond encrusted, oil infused 8800gt).

I'm not sure when it will be a good time to buy one :-) (except 2 months ago)
November 26, 2007 1:01:26 AM

There's never a good time to buy a new graphics card. There's often a better card a few months later, and the next die shrink is always just around the corner.

There's never a bad time to buy a new graphics card, unless you use the rent money. There's always a performance increase in the games you already have, and the hope that it will play upcoming games.

It's all relative, and only you can make the decision when to buy.
November 26, 2007 2:24:30 AM

K_M82 said:
I use this principle when I bought a new GPU: Wait until the lowest high end part reach $300 (for example in this generation I bought NVidia 8800GTS 320MB when the price for that part reaches $300) and skip one generation (Buy NVidia 7800 series but not 7900, because it's only a die shrink, I only buy new architecture). It just not economical for me to buy a $500 GPU, I only have a 19' LCD and I never use anti aliasing.

Odd, I used very nearly this exact same method and purchased the exact same card (the 8800GTS) for right at $300.

That said, it really didn't work out so great this time because only a couple months later you can get a 3850 for $179 that is nearly as good as the GTS or for a little more a 3870 which is better or a 8800GT which is better still.

So right now (in hindsight) is a much better time to buy than when we did.

Other than near term shortages the longer you wait the better. When the supply chain is full of all the cool, nice new cards and they start discounting them would be the best time.
November 26, 2007 12:45:59 PM

For me the best time to buy a graphics card was a combination of the following:-

1) Old rigs were on their deathbeds
2) Old rigs were incapable of playing the games I wanted to play the way I wanted to play them
3) I had the money available

All of these combined around this time last year I was just pricing up for 2 new rigs with the ATI1950's in when nvidia released the 8800GTX so I jumped on that a few days after release, probably the worst time possible to buy a card when you get any release bugs, highest price premiums etc etc, and of course 50% of the forum was saying that ATI had a card which was due to be released in a months time that was going to wipe the floor with it :lol: 

But that was the time I had the money the rigs needed buying there and then or the money would dissapear into a blackhole. So I made a purchase that many would consider a bad idea - top of the line, right at launch, with a hot product from the competition waiting in the wings. Ive been enjoying the performance of the card for a year now. Never once regretted it.

Now though however I want an upgrade... Theres not a lot out there better than what I have, that was somewhat unexpected.

I genuinely believed that my card was going to be out of date in a month and that the same performance would be availble in 6 months time for half the price... I was wrong! But my buying strategy worked because it was based on getting the best I could when I had the opportunity to do so.

A "sensible" buying strategy would have had me waiting 6 months believeing the hype behind the 2900's and buying into the forum rumours about the "monster" that the new ATI card would be and believeing it was going to be available "next month" for months on end. Then when the dissapointing release came believing the hype about how the 2900 was a "next generation" card it was a "true" DX10 card and when DX 10 games came along it would rule the roost :sleep: .

The morals of the story?

Never believe forum hype about the "next release" or the next "driver optimisation". Products are only worth buying if they stand on their own two feet the way they play TODAY in the games you want to play TODAY.

Accept the very high possibility (I would have said fact at one time) that whatever you buy will be out of date within a month, but will still do the job you brought it to do as well as it did the day you brought it. We're talking computers obsoletion is a fact of life, progress is a fact of life.
November 26, 2007 2:16:57 PM

Crabdog had the best answer, but an elaboraion of that would be

The best time to upgrade your GPU is when your current GPU cannot play the games you want (i.e new games) at acceptable framerates.

An illustration of that would be that my 2004 spec machine (Athlon64 3400 with GF6800GT) plays 2004 games I like perfectly but today's terribly.

It's a cruel irony that Crysis looks noticeably worse on my computer than Far Cry does. But I'll be upgrading soon.

At the same token when is it time to upgrade your CPU?

When modern programmes (not games) cause unacceptable lag times.
November 27, 2007 12:52:54 AM

Well the processor is a Q6700 overclocked to 3.2 ghz on stock voltage.

So it looks like I should just wait tell the next game I want to play is available. In generally I only play MMOrpgs however I play them on a 24 inch HD monitor now.

Since I don't like FPS games like Crysis mean nothing to me. So it sounds like the moral of the story is just wait for the next big thing for now, and future proof my rig when the next big game I want comes out. In that case, it should be about 4-6 months tell I look again. Here's hoping for a jump as big as the current one.
November 27, 2007 2:33:53 AM

Watch the trends.

New cards come out. Old ones go down in price. Even older cards go down even more in price. The oldest cards stay about the same in price.

New cards become common and their price starts to creap downwards. Old ones go down a bit more in price. Even older cards do down just a slightly more in price. The oldest cards go up in price.

Yes, cards creap up in price. Too expensive to make or less common cards become "more valuable", or maybe it is getting the most $ from any idiot that would buy 4 year old cards.

The real trick is guess how much and when. 10% on a $300 card is a nice price cut. 20% is even nicer. But at the $100 level those reductions are usually only 5% or maybe 10%, which is not enough to try and time your purchase unless $5 is make or break trying the pay the rent and buying the wife a Big Mac on Friday Night Date Night.

As good as the 8800GT is reported to be (and rumours of better on the horizon) I would expect to see drastic cuts in the older 8800 and other 8 series cards over the next 30- 90 days. As the 8 series cards drop in price, obviously the 7 series cards will need to drop in price as why would somebody buy an 7300 (why would anybody buy a 7300 is the first question), but why would somebody buy a 7300 when they could get an 8400 or 8600 for just about the same price? And those 6 series cards, yes they will really start to climb in price. I bet before long you could walk into BB and pay $300 for a top of the line 6 series card.
November 27, 2007 8:17:14 PM

This is the way I see it....

When Doom 3 came out in the summer of '04, it was at the forefront of technology. At that point, a 6800 Ultra, the best card at that time, could not run it with all settings enabled (similar to how an 8800 Ultra cannot run Crysis with all settings enabled). However, the 7000 series was release in June of '05, and made easy work of Doom 3.

IMHO, Crysis is the new Doom 3, for benchmarking purposes. It is at the forefront of new technology. A card costing, oh, $400ish in the middle of '05 could run Doom 3 balls to the wall. However, in the middle of '08 that same card will be running all the latest games on their lowest settings (but still at playable frame rates). By the middle of '09, the hot card from '05 will be all but unplayable.

My point? Over the years I've seen a trend like this. A company releases a groundbreaking, hardware intensive game, and it takes a few months for cards to catch up. However, once you can grab a card that will run that game maxed out, that card will most likely last you a good three years (with obviously decreasing filters and frame rates as games improve).

My advice is to wait until you can get your hands on a card that will run Crysis at max settings (or close to it) at the resolution you play at. That card should last you the longest, thus more bang for the buck.

The short version: wait for the 9000 series.

As an ironic aside, the 9800 ATI was one of the sweeter cards when Doom 3 was released. It'd be funny if the 9800 nVidia proves to be the card for Crysis.
November 27, 2007 8:29:43 PM

Oh yeah, and regarding what month to purchase:

At this point, video card technology is on a cusp...a lot of things are changing. DX10, smaller die sizes, increased stream processors, PCIe 2.0, etc. If you're looking to insulate yourself against upgrades for a good two years or so, wait for a $400 9000 series. That might be January, that might be February, who knows.

Another option is just to buy an eVGA anything, which will give you a 3 month step-up window. If a 9000 series isn't released within three months, I'll eat my shoe.
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