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dvd -> hdd conversion

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August 10, 2008 12:16:20 PM

I want to convert all my DVD to a format I can store on my HDD for my mediacenter to access.
Those movies you can download at say torrent comes with files with subs to them, I would like that too, so in short.

1. convert dvd to hdd in a codec that amd 780g can hardware decode would be great if possible
2. rip the subs as well, can cyberlinks dvd player v.8 use those? how?
3. what program can rip both the video and the text?
4. is there anything in the 780g chipset that can hardware encode these things? or would a gfx like 4870 be able to do so? with what program?

hope someone can help with this, I am really new to this ripping dvds (it is legal to do so where I live as long as I own the dvd)

More about : dvd hdd conversion

a b G Storage
August 10, 2008 1:07:45 PM

Most rips out in torrent land are in xvid/avi format....these are easily played with codec packs you get off the net.
Divix codec for windows allows you to play these movies through media player in full screen,widescreen and full 5.1 audio.

For ripping in the formats listed above you need a full version of divix...www.divix.com
or you can try and find one on the torrent sites.
when all is said and done you'll take a 4GB dvd and it'll rip to a 700MB file.
That's 1/6th the size of the original dvd and the quality is the same!
I don't do much ripping myself but you should practice ripping when you get the software to perfect the quality and features you want for your collection..
Hope this helps...
August 10, 2008 1:28:22 PM

Alright time for a crash course in DVD ripping/converting. Those denoted with "*" are my personal choices

1.) Semantics
  • Ripping: Copying the DVD files to your HDD
  • Encoding: Transcoding (converting) the DVD files to another (more efficient format)

    2.) Formats
  • MPEG2 (DVDs native format ".vob")
  • MPEG4 part 2 (Advanced Simple Profile)
    (a) Xvid (open source)
    (b) Divx
    (c) WMV
  • MPEG4 part 10 (Advanced Video Codec - H264)
    (a*) X264 (open source and superior to any commercial implementation)
    (b) other commercial implementations
  • Audio
    (a) AC3 (Dvd format)
    (b) DTS (less common DVDformat)
    (c) MP3
    (d*) Ogg-Vorbis (open source)
    (e) AAC (successor to mp3, similar in quality/size to vorbis)
    (f) FLAC (open source lossless format)

  • Subtitles (a few of them)
    (a) idx/sub (DVD native format) - bitmap
    (b) SSA/ASS - text
    (c*) SRT - text
  • Containers
    (a) Vob (DVD native format)
    (b) AVI (old standard, does not support h264)
    (c*) MKV ("matroska" open source - the new standard)
    (d) MP4 (generally not recommended unless for hardware support)

    *Never convert a lossy format to lossless
    *H264 is superior to divx/xvid in enough ways that I cant list them here

    3.) DVD protection
  • Many DVDs only contain CSS encryption. CSS encryption was broken a long time ago, so these dvds will be easy to rip using free tools:
    (a*) DVD decrypter (*best*)
    (b) Ripit4me (free - Uses dvd decrypter - bypasses most structure based protections, but no longer updated)
    (c) DVDfab decrypter (free - bypasses most structure based protections and is constantly updated for new discs)
  • Newer DVDs contain nasty structure "protection" designed to thwart standard ripping tools. Basically these look like corrupt discs to free tools. Only a few tolls exist that can bypass the structure protections:
    (a*) Ripit4me (free - Uses dvd decrypter - bypasses most structure based protections)
    (b*) Slysoft ANYDVD/ANYDVD-HD (not free, but the best software in terms of bypassing structure based protections)
    (c) DVDfab decrypter (free - bypasses most structure based protections and is constantly updated for new discs)

    *DVDfab is generally not recommended, it sometimes produces bad rips.
    *Recommended way to rip is ANYDVD+DVD Decrypter
    *ripit4me is recommended if you want to stick to free tools

    4.) Ripping - Using Slysoft AnyDVD + DVD Decrypter
  • Open AnyDVD, and let it scan the disc
  • Fire up DVDdecrypter and rip the DVD files to your HDD.
    (a) DVDdecrypter has many modes, probably you should stick with IFO mode, and select the main movie.
    (b) You have the option to split files. You can make one big file, split by cells, chapters, file size. Or you can rip the entire disc to a .iso

    *many players can open .iso directly without the need to mount

    5.) Converting to another format
    What we want to do here is save space, by transcoding MPEG2 DVD files to a more efficient format like h264.

  • Codecs (formats) I use:
    (a) X264
    (b) Ogg-Vorbis
    (c) SRT
  • Tools (free/opensource)
    (a) Mencoder (opensource, crossplatform)
    (b*) MeGUI (comprehensive frontend to mencoder)
    (c*) Staxrip (not regularly updated, but you can manually update)
    (d) Ripbot264
    (e) AutoMKV
    (f*) Subrip
    (g) DVD shrink

    *DVD subtitles are stored as bitmaps, you can rip the bitmaps into the .idx/sub format or you can use Optical Charitcar Recognition (OCR) with subrip to convert them to text. Converting to text is generally preferable as they can be rendered at higher quality, and edited to your liking.

  • How to do it (extremely simplified)
    (a) Open your source files in the tool of your choice, set the options and filters to your liking, start!
    (b) Mpeg2 -> x264
    (c) AC3/DTS -> Vorbis
    (d) Get subtitles
    (e) Mux everything into the MKV container.

    *It is a common misconception that 2 pass encoding gives higher quality. It does not. It only helps to accurately hit a desired bitrate. If you are not concerned about hitting a desired bitrate, It is suggested to use x264 with Constant Rate Factor. CRF is nice because it dynamically changes the quantisizer based on the scene. Slow moving scenes that require lots of detail will require a higher quantisizer while fast moving scenes wont require as much. CRF values between 18-22 achieve very good size/quality ratios. For this reason, I leave CRF at 18 for all of my movies and TV shows. Obviously movies like the matrix come out larger in size, compared to a simple movie, but I prefer this as it dynamically gives more bitrate when it needs it.

    6.) Players
  • There are many many players out there. Some require DirectShow filters, some do not. Those denoted with "@" require Dshow filters.
    (a) Codec packs are EVIL. Do not install any codec pack. Ever.
    (b*) The only "package" you will ever need is FFdshow. Most codec packs simply contain FFdshow + other conflicting codecs. FFdshow by its self can play virtually any format.
    (c*@) Media Player Classic (or a more up to date MPC-HC) - open source
    (d@) Windows Media Player
    (e) Mplayer/SMplayer - open source, has many many front ends.
    (f) VLC - Open Source
    *VLC has crappy support for mkv, suggested to use Mplayer (with a a front end like smplayer) or media player classic + FFdshow.


    7.) Links:
    www.doom9.org
    ^everything I mentioned, plus a meriad of more information, tools, guides can be found here.

    This is just a short guide, to get your feet wet. Happy converting :) 
    Related resources
    August 10, 2008 1:42:59 PM

    *awaits skittle's reply patiently* :) 
    August 10, 2008 2:45:59 PM

    johnnyq1233 said:
    Most rips out in torrent land are in xvid/avi format....these are easily played with codec packs you get off the net.
    Divix codec for windows allows you to play these movies through media player in full screen,widescreen and full 5.1 audio.

    For ripping in the formats listed above you need a full version of divix...www.divix.com
    or you can try and find one on the torrent sites.
    when all is said and done you'll take a 4GB dvd and it'll rip to a 700MB file.
    That's 1/6th the size of the original dvd and the quality is the same!
    I don't do much ripping myself but you should practice ripping when you get the software to perfect the quality and features you want for your collection..
    Hope this helps...


    Making a good quality (transparent from the source) 700mb file from a DVD is really hard to do. This leaves roughly 150-200mb for sound and 500mb for the movie. Without some very heavy denoising (blurring), this is impossible.. especially with older ASP codecs like xvid and divx.

    On that note, why would anyone pay for DIVX when you could use open source alternatives (that provide better quality than divx) like xvid or even better x264 or free?
    August 10, 2008 5:50:10 PM

    I spent like an hour writing that and no comments :( 
    August 10, 2008 6:01:50 PM

    in the past 700 mb movies were the standard because they fit on a cd. DVDs are so cheap and common that movies are being released to torrent in 1.4GB files, sometimes split into 2 which is not necessary. It all depends on how much disk space you have. you could reburn 3 - 1.4 GB movies to a single DVD, or pick up a 1 TB hard drive for extremely cheap and filler up.
    August 10, 2008 6:07:09 PM

    Very nice skittle. I aways convert full format, it takes alot of space but it is clean like this.



    If you no a way to rip to a samller size and keep my bling please fill me in.
    August 10, 2008 6:08:30 PM

    Who uses torrents these days.

    Newgroups, are 100000% better then torrents.

    With newsgrops, on a 5meg connection I download 1Gig every 15 minutes. My speeds cap out at 1300KBs. On torrents I was lucky to get over 123 and usually average around 30-60KBs.

    I pay $18 a month for my newsgroup subscription but its worth it.

    I only download legal stuff though.
    August 10, 2008 6:13:11 PM

    roadrunner197069 said:
    Very nice skittle. I aways convert full format, it takes alot of space but it is clean like this.
    ...
    If you no a way to rip to a samller size and keep my bling please fill me in.


    Well, what are you currently using?

    The only thing I have ever downloaded is planet earth in HD, simply because the DVDs are VERY BADLY mastered and I dont have access to a bluray drive.
    August 10, 2008 6:20:16 PM

    Curently I rip to HDD in full 1:1 with My Movies 2, It puts the cover art and the movie description in for you. This is how it stores the files:

    August 10, 2008 6:23:37 PM

    Well your just using media center, so if media center can open it, then yes.
    August 10, 2008 6:33:16 PM

    Im gonna have to try because full DvDs take altot of space. Im buying a projecter next month to run my xbox 360 and my DvD library on a 11 foot screen.
    August 10, 2008 6:34:41 PM

    Are you playing the files through the xbox?
    August 10, 2008 6:46:04 PM

    If you cant get it to work (im fairly certain you can) then you can organize and play files like I do :) 

    August 10, 2008 6:48:33 PM

    No. Xbox 360 only accecpts windows media player format and I think Dvix/Xvid now but I'm not sure.
    August 10, 2008 6:50:54 PM

    I think I will do some like that to stream to xbox but I love the bling I got on the computer.

    Family and friends are alwasys like badass.

    I can play my nintendo roms through my xbox 360 though. I got 865 Super nintendo Roms.
    August 11, 2008 6:40:52 PM

    skittle thanks a lot for the long long post, much appreciated and I will definetly have to look into it, thats for sure.

    roadrunner does "my movies 2" not have an option to "convert" it or is it just a ripper? was pondering on just doing full size since hdd space is so cheap anyways. whats the average size of a dvd 4 gigs?

    so my 120ish dvd's should equal 480 gigs hdd space, thats not bad at all, especially not since I am considering to have a 2TB Nas and 1-2TB in my media center (less viewed on the nas, rest on the htpc)
    August 11, 2008 6:46:37 PM

    Ya my movies 2 is a ripper only, it has a frontend kinda like the one i got above but its not as clean as media center DvD library.

    To get the DvD library in Media center you need to hack the registry. Its real easy to do, you just change a string from play to gallery.
    August 11, 2008 8:11:50 PM

    hmm tested some of the utilities and found this to work semi decently (trial versions if they require payment)

    1. AnyDVD installed and running (to remove the anti-copy crap)
    2. DVD Decrypter to RIP the DVD to HDD
    3. TMPGenc to encode in MPEG4 (that is H.264 right?)

    All I needed to do was rename the .vob to .mpg so TMPGenc will open the files, add all the files you ripped and ask it to encode to whatever format you wish.

    Having only the trial versions is kinda annoying with popups and overlay text in the encoded clip, but when I make my final decission I will register whater I choose to use.

    Any comments on this setup?
    August 12, 2008 5:49:44 PM

    MPEG4 =! h264

    If your a real nooby, I suggest you try automkv, ripbot264, or staxrip as they will handle most of the setup for you.

    You should never have to pay for anything (except if you need anydvd). All of the tools are open source or freeware.

    The general (detailed) way to transcode .vob to h264 is:
    index .vobs with dgindex, frameserve the resulting .d2v from dgindex with avisynth to x264.exe, mux to mkv with mkvtoolnix.

    edit: average size of a DVD varies with the source. I have seen anywhere between 2-8gb.

    Renaming .vob to mpeg may *work* in some cases, but it is not a good idea. The streams will not be processed accurately. This is best handled by dgindex, again a few of the tools i mentioned handle all of this for you.

    Xbox360 can play h264 files, although I cant remember what profile level. probably 4.1
    August 12, 2008 6:32:26 PM

    ok I just wondered since TMPGenc promises H.264 encoding, BUT I did not see it in the options I had other then the mpeg4 option (which I thought was also H.264 due to misleading info on TMPGenc's website).

    They list this:
    H.264/MPEG-4 ISO output (Standard and High Definition)

    Inside the program I see:
    ISO MPEG-4 Format
    MPEG-4 AVC Format
    (thought one of these where what I wanted but I guess not)

    Anything else that I think could be "H.264" might be one of these:
    HDV-HD1 Format
    HDV-HD2 Format (larger resolutions then the HD1)
    BDMV
    BDAV

    Hmm just found this in their help file:

    >> This window appears when you select the MPEG-4 file output template, available in the Output format selector. This
    template provides access to the ISO MPEG-4 or MPEG-4 AVC (H.264) file output settings of the Format stage. Since these
    settings allows you to generate almost any kind of MPEG-4 format, the resulting file may not be playable on all platforms.
    When using the MPEG-4 file output template in order to create a media or format-specific compliant file, be sure you keep
    the settings within the required specifications. <<
    August 12, 2008 6:56:30 PM

    just set a test dvd to run, says it takes 2 hours for a 1hour 22min movie (notice this is on a gimp notebook with a T7250 @ 2GHz with 2GB ram
    August 12, 2008 10:09:13 PM

    Yes, h264 can take a long time. It depends on the options enabled however.
    August 13, 2008 5:04:39 PM

    I used TMPGenc to convert a DVD to a MP4 file but ran into problems:

    I wanted to convert a 720x576 format DVD to a 720x428 format MPEG4 AVC

    In "Source" I edited all the 5 clips for the movie to use a crop to remove 74 pixels from the top and the bottom and they showed fine in the program.

    In the "Format" I changed the resolution accordingly but the output format is still 720x576, pretty big downer after a 4.5 hour long encode to find out the program screwed up.

    Is this a known bug in the free version, or a general bug in both free/paid version? I wanted it to remove the black bars since they take up a lot of space and are useless, especially when viewed in mediaplayer in windows, making the actual movie even smaller when in full screen then when playing the DVD.

    Any solutions?

    I was just about to buy the full version since I like how it works, but the final trial encode messing up like that is very critical and means no purchase from my side until I have a solution to fix it, so any help is much appreciated.

    August 13, 2008 10:53:21 PM

    Why are you still using TMPGenc? There are better (free) programs.
    August 14, 2008 7:13:58 PM

    well it is the demo, hence free to test with and extremely easy to use

    just want to know why it make black bars when I wanted to remove them, you know a program that can and WILL remove them when I ask it to do so? I want the movie to fill as much of the screen as possible when I maximise view in my player and adding black bars makes the view even smaller then when I run the movie straight from the dvd
    August 15, 2008 7:26:22 PM

    All of the tools I mentioned.

    Quote:

  • Tools (free/opensource)
    (a) Mencoder (opensource, crossplatform)
    (b*) MeGUI (comprehensive frontend to mencoder)
    (c*) Staxrip (not regularly updated, but you can manually update)
    (d) Ripbot264
    (e) AutoMKV
    !