Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

How many partition(and size) for 640gb

Last response: in Storage
Share
August 11, 2008 3:42:45 PM

Hey guys,
I've searched the forum but couldn't find anything about what size for partitions.

So here are my questions:
- How many partition should I have?
- What size should I give them (I have a WD Caviar 640gb)
- What's the benefit of it(pros and cons)?

I already have one partition (C:)  with 80gb for windows
I made one called Apps (E:)  with 150gb for applications
I plan to make one called Docs with 150-200gb for movies, pics, music etc...
Is this a good stratedy?

I've made E: a primary partition too, is it true I can't run an application from E: while something is running on C:?

Thanks

More about : partition size 640gb

August 11, 2008 4:00:44 PM

Your setup looks fine, I wouldn't change anything.

If E is a primary partition, you SHOULD still be able to run programs off it as long as C: is the boot drive; don't quote me on that though....
a b G Storage
August 11, 2008 4:31:21 PM

That should work fine, though I tend to just leave it as one large partition, as I can never predict which stuff will use up the most space.
Related resources
August 11, 2008 4:47:13 PM

It doesn't really matter how you do it. I usually try to make partitions equal to platter size though.
August 11, 2008 5:02:17 PM

thanks for the quick replies

what's the platter size? what does it refers to?

August 11, 2008 5:08:58 PM

I usually segregate the OS and system tools from the rest of my applications. If I need a new OS, I wipe everything but my music/vids/etc. If I want to format, I delete the partion that does not hold the OS, saving an install.

Plus, you lose less stuff when Windows goes on you. :D 
a c 167 G Storage
August 11, 2008 5:32:57 PM

What do you wish to accomplish by partitioning?

August 11, 2008 6:43:09 PM

I wish to gain performance and safety (less chance of losing data)
a b G Storage
August 11, 2008 6:53:39 PM

Since the partitions will all be on the same drive, you won't gain any performance. As for safety, it won't protect your programs or your OS, though it could help protect your data in the event of serious OS corruption.
August 11, 2008 7:08:22 PM

So should I just make one big partition with all I have left? (I already have 80gb for windows 150gb for apps and around 400gb unformatted)

I also have 2 other hard drives in 2 separate desktops; one of them already has windows installed and I don't want to mess things up. Can I just plug them in my new case? or do I have to do something first?

With these 2 harddrives, is there anything I could do about performance(stock docs on one, run apps on another and windows on a 3rd?)

Thanks
August 11, 2008 8:40:33 PM

This is one of those cases of there not being one right way of doing this, and that you should just do what works for you.

What I tend to do (again, a suggestion, not gospel) is use multiple hard drives. One for boot and another for data (if I were to only use two drives). I don't partition.

Now on servers, I'll create partitions if I don't have other drives or RAID arrays to work with, as data is mission critical, and a corrupt OS won't affect the data or vice versa (as long as it's not a physical hard drive or array failure)...

EDIT:
Quote:
Can I just plug them in my new case? or do I have to do something first?


That's just ASKING for a Blue Screen of Death...

You can't transfer an OS to a different motherboard or drive controller as is.

In this case, you have two options:

1) Take your Blue Screen of Death like a man. Get your XP or Vista disc and do a repair-install. Sometimes this works fine, other times it gets downright ugly (particularly when your current installation of XP has five billion more updates and one or two more Service Packs than your XP or Vista disc has--gets even worse if Internet Explorer 7 is installed on XP)...

2) Just install a new OS and reinstall everything. Takes longer, but is cleaner in the long run.
August 11, 2008 9:02:52 PM

I already have my OS installed on a 'clean harddrive'

My concern is for my 2 extra harddrives:

-the first one:
In my old desktop I didn't have space for another HD, therefore for data storage I bought an enclosure and put a Barracuda 7200.11 500gb in it.
There is only movies and pics on this harddrive.
I was wondering for this one if you think I could install it inside my case (I have plenty of room for it) or should I just keep it in my enclosure.

-the second one:
This was my harddrive with my OS inside my old desktop.
what I was thinking is if I can put my barracuda inside my case, I could plug this one in my enclosure and retrieve the data from it (I got some saved games, documents and such...)


Then once I have my barracuda set up as a 2nd harddrive, any strategy to gain performance?

what do you think?

thanks
August 11, 2008 9:02:55 PM

I agree with killer - there is no one right way - it should match your use and preferences.

How do you backup system? That was my primary consideration in setting up partititions - to facilitate easy backups. I ended up with:

C - O/S and applications - Disaster recovery backup only about quarterly
D- Data - this is very small - not even 5 GB after 10 years - which makes for quick and easy backups on DVD and flash. I use a separate folder on the drive for downloaded install packages and similar that I only back up quarterly.
E - Video & music - these are not my own but commercial products for which I still have original media - so no need to back-up at all
F - "Internal" backup - I use it to do a quick and easy backup of D - "Data" drive about once a month. Again this is less than 5 GB - since I have plenty of space I allocated 20 GB and keep 4 versions deep. It is mainly to have a backup in case I inadvertently delete a file or for some reason it becomes corrupt, or I saved changes over something I later wish I had. Obviously it would not help if disk becomes corrupt or damaged. I have never had to use it - but I consider it cheap insurance for one type of data loss.
August 11, 2008 9:13:25 PM

hkg36 said:

My concern is for my 2 extra harddrives:

-the first one:
In my old desktop I didn't have space for another HD, therefore for data storage I bought an enclosure and put a Barracuda 7200.11 500gb in it.
There is only movies and pics on this harddrive.
I was wondering for this one if you think I could install it inside my case (I have plenty of room for it) or should I just keep it in my enclosure.

-the second one:
This was my harddrive with my OS inside my old desktop.
what I was thinking is if I can put my barracuda inside my case, I could plug this one in my enclosure and retrieve the data from it (I got some saved games, documents and such...)

what do you think?

thanks


Regarding the first, again this is a matter of preference. If you have the PSU capacity and connectors on your mobo - no reason you could not put it in. How is the external unit connected? eSATA or USB? If USB the internal use would speed up access considerably. On the other hand, is there some portability or security value in an external drive? Could you also use it to backup part of main system and have safer storage not near computer - in case it gets stolen - or a quick drive to run out with in case of fire?

On the second, I think it would be far easier - and safer in not risking data loss - to simply transer the data from the old drive to your new system - by flash drive, network connection, pc to pc connection, of DVD. Then install the old drive as a non-boot disk and immediately reformat it - making it available for future storage - you might even then transfer the old data back if you wish.
August 11, 2008 9:20:33 PM

Oops - quoted my previous message when I was only trying to edit it. Made the edit above.
August 11, 2008 9:27:20 PM

You'll have no problem putting either hard drive in your computer.
a c 167 G Storage
August 11, 2008 9:31:42 PM

Partitioning will not make a meaningful difference in performance, or lessen the risk of losing data.

For performance, it is good to be able to spread the activity out over more than on drive. Put your input on one, and your output on the other for sequential operations. A faster 10,000rpm drive can improve performance some, but they are expensive. SSD's are coming, with even more potential for performance.

To reduce the risk of losing data, you need to have EXTERNAL backup. Hard drives advertise MTBF times of 1 million hours. That's 100 years. I doubt that it really is that long, but if you keep your hard drives as cool as possible, then failure should be only a remote possibility. Much more likely is destruction due to spyware, virus, operator error, program error...etc.
August 12, 2008 1:36:18 AM

Ok thanks for all the advices.

If I get it right,
(remember I have 3 HD: WD 640gb, Barracuda 500gb and Maxtor 160gb)

I could use my WD for OS and docs (movies, pics etc..)
I could install my barracuda inside my case for applications
and use my Maxtor for External Backup?

would that be ok?
August 13, 2008 6:35:50 PM

If I use my WD for OS and docs (movies, pics etc..)
I could install my barracuda inside my case for applications
and use my Maxtor for External Backup?

would that be ok?
August 31, 2008 12:14:55 AM

I just built a new machine, and installed a WD 640GB - how should I partition it? I'm installing XP only.....Vista later. Only using one HD. Will play games, movies, pics, music. How does 50gb for OS and 560gb for eerything else sound? or no partition?
October 1, 2008 3:48:01 PM

I have the same question!

WindowXP use 80GB is enough

others doc....
!