GA-P35-DS3L Troubleshooting

Okay, I purchased a DS3L last week and received it today. Unfortunately, it comes with an older BIOS because I cannot get the damn thing to POST. According to the Gigabyte site, the new BIOS fix this issue; I've downloaded it and moved it to a USB flash drive, but the issue is that PS/2 keyboards aren't recognized... so i can't even enter the flash BIOS utility to fix the issue!!!

I've read a few threads (most notably, this one: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/245841-30-ds3l-bios-setup), and it seems it's a simple case of restarting the CMOS and it should work.

According to the manual, this can be done by removing the battery for some time, and replacing it and everything SHOULD be good, right?

Well, it hasn't worked. I've removed it for 30 minutes, unplugged, and nothing.

There's also a "jumper pin" method but I'm unsure how that works so I'm not going to touch that unless someone can guide me through that.


Anyway... any suggestions?

I'd really appreciate any feedback and/or help from people that have had this issue.
I really don't want to RMA Replace this board because then that means I won't be able to have my new system up and running until sometime next week!!!

Thanks in advance!
20 answers Last reply
More about ds3l troubleshooting
  1. Resetting the BIOS will not update it, so the problem will still exist. The only way I can think of is to borrow or buy a USB keyboard, or get a PS2-USB adapter. Don't know about NY pricing, but down here in BIG D I can get either item for $3-4. You just need a cheap setup to get it working. Not bad to have an extra KB around anyway.
  2. I haven't had the issue, or the board, but i do know a good amount of mobo troubleshooting.

    I'm taking the problem as you turn the power on and nothing happens - fans spin, but nothing on screen

    The jumper thing really isn't a big deal.
    Sometimes depending on the motherboard model, the procedure is normally this:
    1.unplug the PSU from the wall
    2.Find the CMOS clear jumper
    3.Remove the jumper pin. note on which two of the three pins it covers.
    4.Replace the jumper, this time putting it on the opposite pin (clear position)
    5.Leave the jumper there for a while (usually a minute or so)
    6.Replace the jumper to its original position (run position)
    7.Plug in your PSU and fire her up!

    You should get a CMOS clear declaration on your BIOS POST screen.
    This is normal. Your system time will be reset, along with any overclock settings (which you don't have any)

    Here's a crude diagram of the Jumper

    It will be three pins in order
    1 2 3
    The position the motherboard comes in will be the RUN position, and pins 1 and 2 OR 2 and 3 will be linked with a small bridge.
    To turn that into a CLEAR position, simply cover the opposite two pins:
    So if your RUN is 1 and 2, your CLEAR will be 2 and 3
    If your RUN is 2 and 3, your CLEAR will be 1 and 2


    Easy as pie.

    -If it still won't POST, then take out parts to the minimum configuration needed (1 stick of ram, no IDE/SATA devices, video card)

    -If you can, swap parts with ones you've known to work the last time they were used.

    -Check and make sure your PSU has proper outputs. Just use a multimeter and compare it to what your PSU says it should put out (if you need help with this, just post again with your PSU model and i'll get back to you)

    -For your keyboard, go to a local retailer and buy a USB/PS-2 converter for your keyboard.

    -I wasn't aware that you could update a BIOS via USB, but then again, I haven't purchased a motherboard in ages.

    There are a few other things you can do, but after those points, it's beginning to look like you just got a bad board. that happens. it sucks, but it happens.


    At one point in time, I would have gone along with what tlmck had said, but I had an old board that wouldn't POST when I got it. Flashed the BIOS and it booted fine. There may have been an error written in the CMOS or something, I'm not sure, but it worked, and it was easy and free. Why not give it a try?
  3. tlmck said:
    Resetting the BIOS will not update it, so the problem will still exist. The only way I can think of is to borrow or buy a USB keyboard, or get a PS2-USB adapter. Don't know about NY pricing, but down here in BIG D I can get either item for $3-4. You just need a cheap setup to get it working. Not bad to have an extra KB around anyway.

    Thanks for your input.

    However, I forgot to mention that USB keyboards haven't been working, either. I think it's in the BIOS settings that i have to enable USB keyboards or whatever.

    I will, however, try the PS2-USB adapter thing first thing tomorrow, I'm sure I can find it for cheap (bought a $10 USB keyboard earlier today to try it on the new rig).

    Thanks again!
  4. frozenlead said:
    I haven't had the issue, or the board, but i do know a good amount of mobo troubleshooting.

    I'm taking the problem as you turn the power on and nothing happens - fans spin, but nothing on screen

    The jumper thing really isn't a big deal.
    Sometimes depending on the motherboard model, the procedure is normally this:
    1.unplug the PSU from the wall
    2.Find the CMOS clear jumper
    3.Remove the jumper pin. note on which two of the three pins it covers.
    4.Replace the jumper, this time putting it on the opposite pin (clear position)
    5.Leave the jumper there for a while (usually a minute or so)
    6.Replace the jumper to its original position (run position)
    7.Plug in your PSU and fire her up!

    You should get a CMOS clear declaration on your BIOS POST screen.
    This is normal. Your system time will be reset, along with any overclock settings (which you don't have any)

    Here's a crude diagram of the Jumper

    It will be three pins in order
    1 2 3
    The position the motherboard comes in will be the RUN position, and pins 1 and 2 OR 2 and 3 will be linked with a small bridge.
    To turn that into a CLEAR position, simply cover the opposite two pins:
    So if your RUN is 1 and 2, your CLEAR will be 2 and 3
    If your RUN is 2 and 3, your CLEAR will be 1 and 2


    Easy as pie.

    -If it still won't POST, then take out parts to the minimum configuration needed (1 stick of ram, no IDE/SATA devices, video card)

    -If you can, swap parts with ones you've known to work the last time they were used.

    -Check and make sure your PSU has proper outputs. Just use a multimeter and compare it to what your PSU says it should put out (if you need help with this, just post again with your PSU model and i'll get back to you)

    -For your keyboard, go to a local retailer and buy a USB/PS-2 converter for your keyboard.

    -I wasn't aware that you could update a BIOS via USB, but then again, I haven't purchased a motherboard in ages.

    There are a few other things you can do, but after those points, it's beginning to look like you just got a bad board. that happens. it sucks, but it happens.


    At one point in time, I would have gone along with what tlmck had said, but I had an old board that wouldn't POST when I got it. Flashed the BIOS and it booted fine. There may have been an error written in the CMOS or something, I'm not sure, but it worked, and it was easy and free. Why not give it a try?

    Wow. First off, thank you so much for writing such a detailed response.

    However, it appears I was a bit unclear once again.

    The computer powers on, fans spin, the screen jumps to a GIGABYTE flash screen, with a few keys to press on the bottom. DEL for BIOS Setup (which I'm supposed to be pressing), END for Q-Flash (which is how I can update the BIOS via Flash drive), etc.

    ...and that's it.
    Like I said, the keyboard just isn't recognized. It's a defect in the BIOS, because as I said in the topic post, it's been updated.


    Anyway, with this motherboard, there's actually 2 pins that aren't connected for the CLR_CMOS. I tried taking a picture for you but Windows is acting up and won't let me get it from my Digicam (ughh).

    Under the CLR_CMOS part printed onto the motherboard, it reads "SHORT: OPEN, CLEAR CMOS: NORMAL".

    I'm not sure what exactly this refers to. I've read the manual, and it's fairly vague (for me, at least):

    " To clear the CMOS values, place a jumper cap on the two pins to temporarily short the two pins or use a metal object like a screwdriver to touch the two pins for a few seconds"

    I've tried the screwdriver approach, but it didn't work for me. At least, I don't think it did (problem remains, no Clear CMOS report or something).

    ...what's a jumper cap and where can I find one?

    Thanks again, everyone!!
  5. If the USB keyboard don't work, that adapter won't either. I have the same board, but I started with a USB keyboard and mouse. I guess my BIOS was preset to USB or something. It worked so I never even thought of it.

    Also forgot to mention that pulling the battery works the same as doing the jumper thing.
  6. maybe a long shot, but did you try a different ps2 keyboard? and are you sure its in the right spot? there isnt a bios made that wont allow a bootup to both a ps2 and usb keyboard.
  7. you can enter the bios of just about any motherboard from the Pentium 3 days upward - its using the usb keyboard after the initial bios screen where it becomes flaky (requiring USB Legacy support option to be enabled, tricking everything to think its a legacy PS2 device) - you must be doing something wrong if you cant use the usb keyboard in the bios.
  8. I have had Pentiums, Dell comes to mind, that when defaulted could not see the USB keyboard to get into BIOS and I had to get an old PS2 keyboard to get in. I have never had a PS2 keyboard fail to get into BIOS though. I know this is too obvious but make sure the PS2 Keyboard is plugged into the proper port, not the mouse port. I don't know what Gigabyte is talking about, If you can't use the keyboard you can't update the BIOS. Post your specs and more details about what they said.

    Edit: there are only 2 pins on the board. If you shorted them for several seconds with any conductive object then you reset the BIOS to factory defaults.
  9. Having the same issue, they told me to reset CMOS...still my PS2 is not being recognized.
  10. bkarevolutionary said:
    ...what's a jumper cap and where can I find one?

    Thanks again, everyone!!


    Wow, the geeks today don't even know what jumper caps are... damn, I feel old.

    AFAIK, you can get jumper caps at Radio Shack, about 10 for $1.00.

    Of course, the last time I bought them was about 5 years ago, so who knows if they still sell them (they seem to be phasing out their electronics hobbyist inventory in favor of the same damn DVD players and iPod accessories everybody else sells).
  11. Greetings -
    I am facing the exact same issue with a new build - and a USB keyboard with and without a PS2 adapter
    I get the single healthy beep
    The gigabyte spalsh screen
    Press delete to enter BIOS
    Then...machine goes to that list of IDE and PCI ports and tells me I have an error.
    I reset the CMOS and when I boot I get the CMOS reset --use up and down arrow to make selections, etc
    The seconds tick away on the bottom of that screen and NO button presses do any good. Simply no keyboard response.
    Lots of different combinations tried [keyboard to several USB ports, keyboard to PS2 with USB - PS2 adapter]
    I will get a PS2 keyboard from Wallyworld tonight and see if it works.
    If not, and I am afraid of this, then what?
    RMA?

    Thanks for an informative forum.
    -w
  12. I had the same problem. Okay, this will sound weird, but I also have a USB flash drive. When I would boot up with the flash drive plugged in, I could hit my delete key and it would let me into the BIOS through my USB keyboard. However, if the flash drive was not plugged in, the lights on my keyboard would not even come on til boot.

    I'm not saying you should rush out and buy a flash drive and see if this works for you. However, maybe try unplugging or plugging any other USB devices you have for the system. That may just let you get into the BIOS. Once in, enable the USB keyboard and USB mouse options.
  13. If there is no cap on the cmos reset pins, just power down the pc and use a philips head screwdriver to short them. All you have to do is make sure the metal is touching both pins at the same time.

    I'd like to add that I have this board in the pc I built for my dad and I never had problems with using a ps/2 keyboard in the bios.
  14. Has anyone who's experienced this probem seen any resolution. I'm having the exact same problem with the same board. I've tried 2 PS/2 boards and 1 USB board. The PS/2 board lights flash on POST, but then I get no keyboard response. I recently sent a message to Gigabyte about the issue, but there's been no reply. I've tried clearing the CMOS and doing a barebones boot. Neither solved the problem.
  15. Try posting/searching over at:
    http://forums.tweaktown.com/f69
    I haven't time to research this morning, but if there's an answer to be had, it's there...
  16. Hmm... I did a bit of research, BUT it appears that even with the latest BIOS this is still an issue. HOWEVER, the BETA F8f doesn't seem to be effected with this problem. You should be able to find the F8f BIOS online (not at the Gigabyte website, check Google) and it should work.
  17. Here's the deal: the latest GB flash utility runs unassisted (and, conversely, uncontrollably) from boot media, and the utility to make a 'flash disk' puts in an autoexec that runs it at boot-up - no keyboard needed. I've only run it from floppy, but it also works from a bootable USB flash (You have to enable Legacy USB support to do this, so that may be a problem, too, with no KB access....) I ran into one of these catch 22's with my DS5 - E0 steppings of 9550 are only supported by f8a, so I popped in a cheap Celeron for all of seven minutes, just to flash the BIOS that would run my CPU...
  18. ^ The autoexe.bat is worth a try.
  19. I just received a response from Gigabyte about this issue. I already swapped my board with the identical model, and the new board worked. But maybe this reply will help someone else:

    "Hello,
    Please disconnect all drive cable from mother board , remove all memory , take onboard cell battery out for 5 sec clear CMOS then test single stick memory on slot close to cpu with a PS2 keyboard , check if system can boot to bios setting , if system still hang on first screen swap out other stick memory check again .
    Note : test with a USB keyboard may needed to find out if bad PS2 keyboard port ."
  20. ^Duh! That's just a typical response. They will usually respond with this 90% of the time.
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