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1080i Flat Screen?

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Anonymous
May 17, 2005 4:11:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Has anyone seen a Flat Screen TV that can actually display a 1920x1080
Screen?

I was in the store the other day looking for a > 32" Flat Screen TV.
I told the salesman that it must have a ATSC tunner and a 1920x1080
display.

They showed my lots of 720 and 480 flat screens none with a ATSC tunner.


--
Korbin Dallas
The name was changed to protect the guilty.

More about : 1080i flat screen

Anonymous
May 17, 2005 4:11:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Korbin Dallas wrote:

> Has anyone seen a Flat Screen TV that can actually display a 1920x1080
> Screen?
>
> I was in the store the other day looking for a > 32" Flat Screen TV.
> I told the salesman that it must have a ATSC tunner and a 1920x1080
> display.
>
> They showed my lots of 720 and 480 flat screens none with a ATSC tunner.

If you are getting a TV for use as a TV with a typical sitting
distance of 8 to 10 feet and the screen diagonal is less than 50" to
60", you will be very hard pressed to see the difference between a
1366x768 and a 1920x1080 display. The limits of the angular resolution
of the human eye is a factor. Don't confuse this issue with desktop
1920x1200 LCD computer monitors because you sit a lot closer to a
desktop monitor than you usually do to a TV. Resolution is not the only
factor when selecting a TV set - contrast, dynamic color range (8 bit vs
12 bit to reduce banding effects), viewing angle, lack of motion smear
and so on.

But to answer your question, there are only 2 flat panel TVs available
that I am aware of at the moment which provide 1920x1080 resolution. The
Sharp 45" Aquos LCD TV is the only widely available one which had a
recent price drop to $7000 USD. Samsung offers a 46" LCD TV, but it has
rarely been seen.

There are more 1080 TVs on the way. More 1080p LCDs down to 37" in
size. The 1920x1080 DLP rear projection TVs will finally hit the market
this summer while the Sony 70" Qualia SXRD has been around since January
but lists for a hefty 13 grand USD.

There are currently no 1080 plasmas except for the 70" LG and a
promised 80" Samsung which has only been seen at trade shows. The LG has
reportedly shipped in very small quantities and supposedly retails for
$45,000, IIRC. We will see more 1080p plasmas soon, but only in very
large and pricey screens for the next several years.

Alan F
Related resources
May 17, 2005 4:11:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Korbin Dallas wrote:
> Has anyone seen a Flat Screen TV that can actually display a 1920x1080
> Screen?
>
> I was in the store the other day looking for a > 32" Flat Screen TV.
> I told the salesman that it must have a ATSC tunner and a 1920x1080
> display.
>
> They showed my lots of 720 and 480 flat screens none with a ATSC tunner.
>
>
And a flat screen would be?? Plasma, LCD, CRT...they can all have "flat
screens"!
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 2:16:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 17 May 2005 11:22:21 -0400, Curmudgeon wrote:

> Korbin Dallas wrote:
>> Has anyone seen a Flat Screen TV that can actually display a 1920x1080
>> Screen?
>>
>> I was in the store the other day looking for a > 32" Flat Screen TV.
>> I told the salesman that it must have a ATSC tunner and a 1920x1080
>> display.
>>
>> They showed my lots of 720 and 480 flat screens none with a ATSC tunner.
>>
>>
> And a flat screen would be?? Plasma, LCD, CRT...they can all have "flat
> screens"!

We are talking about Plasma or LCD TV's

--
Korbin Dallas
The name was changed to protect the guilty.
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 4:39:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I think a more specific term, instead of "flat screen", is "thin panel", and
there is probably an even better term than that. Back in the old days CRT
TVs had curved glass on the display portion. For a while, even before LCD
and Plasma existed as consumer devices CRT makers started advertising fancy
"flat screen" monitors/tvs. They are a big step up from the old curved
glass. Vendors love exploiting the confusion between "flat" and "thin",
advertising "flat screens" for super cheap prices and mailing the goods, boy
I bet some people are pissed!

--Dan

"Korbin Dallas" <korbindallas@dodgeit.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.05.17.22.16.02.362754@dodgeit.com...
> > And a flat screen would be?? Plasma, LCD, CRT...they can all have "flat
> > screens"!
>
> We are talking about Plasma or LCD TV's
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 4:39:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Flat Panel" is the accepted term for thin LCD and plasma displays
which can in theory be wall mounted.

Alan F

dg wrote:
> I think a more specific term, instead of "flat screen", is "thin panel", and
> there is probably an even better term than that. Back in the old days CRT
> TVs had curved glass on the display portion. For a while, even before LCD
> and Plasma existed as consumer devices CRT makers started advertising fancy
> "flat screen" monitors/tvs. They are a big step up from the old curved
> glass. Vendors love exploiting the confusion between "flat" and "thin",
> advertising "flat screens" for super cheap prices and mailing the goods, boy
> I bet some people are pissed!
>
> --Dan
>
> "Korbin Dallas" <korbindallas@dodgeit.com> wrote in message
> news:p an.2005.05.17.22.16.02.362754@dodgeit.com...
>
>>>And a flat screen would be?? Plasma, LCD, CRT...they can all have "flat
>>>screens"!
>>
>>We are talking about Plasma or LCD TV's
>
>
>
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 8:05:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 18 May 2005 00:39:51 +0000, dg wrote:

> I think a more specific term, instead of "flat screen", is "thin panel", and
> there is probably an even better term than that. Back in the old days CRT
> TVs had curved glass on the display portion. For a while, even before LCD
> and Plasma existed as consumer devices CRT makers started advertising fancy
> "flat screen" monitors/tvs. They are a big step up from the old curved
> glass. Vendors love exploiting the confusion between "flat" and "thin",
> advertising "flat screens" for super cheap prices and mailing the goods, boy
> I bet some people are pissed!
>
> --Dan

They marketing types love to play fast and loose with the details.
I guess technically My TV is a Flat Screen TV... But You wont confuse my
Rear Screen Projection 55" TV for a Thin Panel.

Let the buyer be ware about what the salesperson is pitching,
Make sure you know what they mean when they say Enhanced or High
Definition.

--
Korbin Dallas
The name was changed to protect the guilty.
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 11:20:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

X-No-archive: yes

"Korbin Dallas" <korbindallas@dodgeit.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2005.05.17.12.11.23.607078@dodgeit.com...
> Has anyone seen a Flat Screen TV that can actually display a 1920x1080
> Screen?
>
> I was in the store the other day looking for a > 32" Flat Screen TV.
> I told the salesman that it must have a ATSC tunner and a 1920x1080
> display.
>
> They showed my lots of 720 and 480 flat screens none with a ATSC tunner.
>
=========================
All RPTVs are "Flat Screen".
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 10:41:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

dOinK wrote:
> This looks promising (not around today, though):
> http://news.com.com/New+Samsung+panel+pictures+inch-thi...

Given that the lifespan of OLED blue elements is still reportedly less
than 2000 hours, combined with uneven degradation, this technology has a
long way to go before it makes for a viable TV display.

Alan F
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 2:15:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt wrote:
> dOinK wrote:
>
>> This looks promising (not around today, though):
>> http://news.com.com/New+Samsung+panel+pictures+inch-thi...
>
>
>
> Given that the lifespan of OLED blue elements is still reportedly less
> than 2000 hours, combined with uneven degradation, this technology has a
> long way to go before it makes for a viable TV display.

Take a look:

<http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/business/showArticle...;

"Sumitomo Chemical has developed fluorescent and phosphorescent LEPs and
the company's blue-color material achieved 10,000 hours of brightness
half-life. The material is ideal for a printing method, a much simpler
and more cost effective production process for large-sized displays than
the vacuum deposition method used for small-molecular OLEDs".

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
!