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Real speed of wireless networking???

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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March 10, 2009 5:45:33 PM

Ok, I just bought a wireles IEEE 802.11b/g router and adapter:





And I'm concerned about actual transfer rates.

When It usually says it's connected at 54 or 48 Mbps, but when I'm transferring big files (1 GB and above), it starts to go down and ends up on 11Mbps, so it can take about an hour to transfer 2.5 - 3 GB, so my questions are this.

1) Is there a way to transfer files with the actual 54Mbps stated by the product or near that number?
2) Is that 54Kbps really about 1/2 for download and 1/2 for upload?
3) Is the speed of the connection stated on the windows xp task bar's icon the one I should believe?
4) What transfer rates should I expect from my setup?
5) does securing the network give you less transfer rates?


Anonymous
a b F Wireless
March 10, 2009 9:01:54 PM

"Is that 54Kbps really about 1/2 for download and 1/2 for upload?"

Correct, I believe. So far it hasn't mattered too much because broadband speeds are seldom anything like the figures claimed by ISPs.

Aside from the issue of WEP we might as well still be using 802.11b
March 10, 2009 9:13:02 PM

Quote:
"Is that 54Kbps really about 1/2 for download and 1/2 for upload?"

Correct, I believe. So far it hasn't mattered too much because broadband speeds are seldom anything like the figures claimed by ISPs.

Aside from the issue of WEP we might as well still be using 802.11b


Thanks, any answer to the other questions?
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
March 11, 2009 9:00:33 AM

"Is the speed of the connection stated on the windows xp task bar's icon the one I should believe?"

No. The only reliable speed test is to find sites which appears to offer decent download speeds on very large downloads and run tests several times over a period of days. Test wired and via wireless.

"What transfer rates should I expect from my setup?"

That's down to your ISP, the quality of your ADSL/Cable feed (distance from exchange, number of users, noise, house phone wiring etc) and, of course, down to the strength/quality of your wireless.

"does securing the network give you less transfer rates?"
Apparently, yes. And in my experience WPA takes extra time to establish a connection.

Things you can do about it: 1) Don't use wireless (see mains plug netw adapters) 2) Check your phone wiring if on ADSL -- like don't run the router on an extension and investigate buying a purpose built master socket which isolates itself from noise from extension wiring.

March 11, 2009 11:56:04 AM

Sorry, I forgot to tell you, I'm talking about transfer rates from one computer to another. My connection is only 1Mbps, so I'll never be able to determine the limits of my network that way.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
March 11, 2009 12:31:35 PM

Well, the same principles apply. Shove big files back and forth between the machines and test under various conditions (in this case test wireless options until you conclude that wireless is pretty hopeless).

If you must use wireless, avoid using a channel within 5 stops of that in use by a neighbouring wifi network. However, try each of the channels available because the frequencies they represent are affected differently by different environments.

For example in the UK I could use channel 13 which few people know about because most English language hardware reference material is intended for US which only has 11 channels. However 13 doesn't work as well in my home as 6 (on which there are at least two other users nearby).

Raise the router above furniture level, relocate cordless phone base or video sender away from computers or router, try moving the antennas on the equipment, try moving the computers.

I've found that placing my computer hard against the wall nearest the router's location (as opposed in the middle of the room) makes a big difference even though the router is still about 25 feet away, one floor down and the signal has to go through two or three walls.


If all your equipment is 11g -- select g only in the router's wireless mode section -- seems quicker than g&b.
March 13, 2009 2:15:37 AM

Quote:
Well, the same principles apply. Shove big files back and forth between the machines and test under various conditions (in this case test wireless options until you conclude that wireless is pretty hopeless).

If you must use wireless, avoid using a channel within 5 stops of that in use by a neighbouring wifi network. However, try each of the channels available because the frequencies they represent are affected differently by different environments.

For example in the UK I could use channel 13 which few people know about because most English language hardware reference material is intended for US which only has 11 channels. However 13 doesn't work as well in my home as 6 (on which there are at least two other users nearby).

Raise the router above furniture level, relocate cordless phone base or video sender away from computers or router, try moving the antennas on the equipment, try moving the computers.

I've found that placing my computer hard against the wall nearest the router's location (as opposed in the middle of the room) makes a big difference even though the router is still about 25 feet away, one floor down and the signal has to go through two or three walls.


If all your equipment is 11g -- select g only in the router's wireless mode section -- seems quicker than g&b.



Thanks man, you've been very helpful
March 19, 2009 9:38:12 PM

I would also like to add....

If you are testing speed between your network devices for example your wireless laptop to a server, desktop to wireless client. You can you nuttcp or Iperf. Google these...

These are applications that will test your bandwidth between devices.

When you are connected via wireless say 54 PHY rate. This is always 1/2 your actual and sometimes a bit lower due to over head.
March 19, 2009 9:46:37 PM

gstefanick said:
I would also like to add....

If you are testing speed between your network devices for example your wireless laptop to a server, desktop to wireless client. You can you nuttcp or Iperf. Google these...

These are applications that will test your bandwidth between devices.

When you are connected via wireless say 54 PHY rate. This is always 1/2 your actual and sometimes a bit lower due to over head.


Thank's I'll try that
!