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Industrial Plasmas

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Anonymous
May 19, 2005 10:50:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Anyone know about the "industrial" models sold by retailers on Ebay. I know
they may have fewer inputs, but is everything else the same? Also, what are
the "video cards"? Same is in computers?

Thanks in advance

Jeff

More about : industrial plasmas

Anonymous
May 20, 2005 3:58:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff Berk wrote:

> Anyone know about the "industrial" models sold by retailers on Ebay. I know
> they may have fewer inputs, but is everything else the same? Also, what are
> the "video cards"? Same is in computers?
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> Jeff

I would be very hesitant to get an 'industrial' or commercial model
from an Ebay retailer unless you have some confidence that they will
replace the item if it is damaged in shipping. Plasmas are somewhat
fragile and cracked screens in shipping are not uncommon.

I have a commercial Panasonic TH-42PHD7UY HD plasma monitor that I
brought from Visual Apex so I went the commercial monitor route. Unless
you fully understand what you are getting with a commercial monitor, you
should not do so. The commercial models typically lack tuners (both NTSC
and ATSC), speakers (may be optional) and may lack closed captions for
example. The intended market for these is commercial display
applications. The Panasonic comes with 3 slots for the video input cards
which can be HDMI, DVI, component, S-Video. I can swap out the cards to
get the setup I want, but the cards run around $140 each.

If you want to learn more about commercial plasma monitors, try the
plasma forum at
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?s=&foru....

Alan F
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 6:20:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 18:50:28 -0400, "Jeff Berk" <jberk99@yahoo.com> spewed forth
these words of wisdom:

>Anyone know about the "industrial" models sold by retailers on Ebay. I know
>they may have fewer inputs, but is everything else the same? Also, what are
>the "video cards"? Same is in computers?
>
>Thanks in advance
>
>Jeff
>

C|Net loves the industrial models from Panasonic. They are lacking in hookup
options, but tend to have higher quality screens.

--
"I'm not a cool person in real life, but I play one on the Internet"
Galley
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Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:01:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>C|Net loves the industrial models from Panasonic. They are lacking in hookup
>options, but tend to have higher quality screens.

Right now the Panny Commercial models are all 7th generation glass
where the newly released Consumer models are the new 8th gen glass.

I'm sitting here waiting for my new 42PX50U to arrive any minute now
:-)

Randy
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:56:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks for the info, everyone. Think I'll stay with consumer models, maybe
the th-50px50u.

Jeff

"Randy W" <RandyLWaltersremovenospammage@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:428e5003.147191409@news.west.earthlink.net...
>
>>C|Net loves the industrial models from Panasonic. They are lacking in
>>hookup
>>options, but tend to have higher quality screens.
>
> Right now the Panny Commercial models are all 7th generation glass
> where the newly released Consumer models are the new 8th gen glass.
>
> I'm sitting here waiting for my new 42PX50U to arrive any minute now
> :-)
>
> Randy
>
>
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 6:24:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 23:58:19 -0400, Alan Figgatt
<afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote:


>
> I have a commercial Panasonic TH-42PHD7UY HD plasma monitor that I
>brought from Visual Apex
> Alan F


Alan, does yours exhibit the black level changes or strobe that some
people report at AV forum ?
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 2:48:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

sales_n_service wrote:
> On Thu, 19 May 2005 23:58:19 -0400, Alan Figgatt
> <afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> I have a commercial Panasonic TH-42PHD7UY HD plasma monitor that I
>>brought from Visual Apex
>> Alan F
>
> Alan, does yours exhibit the black level changes or strobe that some
> people report at AV forum ?

Yes, the black level of the bars outside of the picture - for
letterboxed or pillarboxed material - does change a small amount
depending on the brightness of the picture area. But this has never
bothered me in any way. I am watching the picture, not the unused part
of the screen, and the picture itself looks fine. I have never noticed a
strobing effect. I stop following the black level changes threads at
avsforum a long time ago as I never did quite follow what people were
complaining about.

Alan F
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 3:47:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 23 May 2005 22:48:59 -0400, Alan Figgatt
<afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote:

>sales_n_service wrote:
>> On Thu, 19 May 2005 23:58:19 -0400, Alan Figgatt
>> <afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>> I have a commercial Panasonic TH-42PHD7UY HD plasma monitor that I
>>>brought from Visual Apex
>>> Alan F
>>
>> Alan, does yours exhibit the black level changes or strobe that some
>> people report at AV forum ?
>
> Yes, the black level of the bars outside of the picture - for
>letterboxed or pillarboxed material - does change a small amount
>depending on the brightness of the picture area. But this has never
>bothered me in any way. I am watching the picture, not the unused part
>of the screen, and the picture itself looks fine. I have never noticed a
>strobing effect. I stop following the black level changes threads at
>avsforum a long time ago as I never did quite follow what people were
>complaining about.
>
> Alan F

My experience also.

The letter/pillar box bars level changes are listed in the owners
manual in the troubleshooting section as normal (due to screen content
processing ?)

As to the "in picture" black level jumps and strobes, I never
understood if it was a real problem or just the normal auto level
thingy working keeping the blacks scaled depending on the picture
content.

Apparently the Samsung LCD does something similar, but you can switch
it off if it bothers you, or if it's not working right with some weird
signal.


Here's part of a good review on one of the search pages.


Samsung LN-R328W 32" LCD TV

.... The 12ms response time on a screen this large is fantastic. The
quick response time makes this an ideal television for fast paced
games. I was not able to see any ghosting whatsoever. Video games that
support higher resolutions look amazing. The only down side to using
this television for video games is the dynamic brightness feature. The
signal from video games is different than normal television, so it
would stand to reason that the dynamic brightness feature won't behave
the same when presented with this type of signal. With dynamic
brightness enabled, the brightness would change at moments when it
shouldn't have, and didn't when it should have. I encountered one
instance where the brightness began to change, (higher and lower)
while navigating through game menus (which is as close to a static
image as you'll get in modern video games). Other times, during game
play, when going from dark area of the game to brighter areas, there
was no shift in brightness. The solution? Turn off dynamic brightness
for video games. Simple as that. The TV still looks fantastic.

The dynamic brightness feature, when used on movies, however, was
great. Worked like a charm. If one looked closely enough, though, you
are able to see the brightness shift when the picture changes. If
you're picky (and I am), this can be annoying, although, in the end, I
chose to enjoy the benefits of this feature, instead of worrying about
the negatives. Two friends of mine did not even notice the brightness
shift, until I told them to look for it.
....


To see the whole review (which is good):

http://techbargains.pricegrabber.com/rating_getprodrev....


It's interesting that things like better black levels are being
dynamically manipulated through circuitry rather than being the raw
native performance of the panels.

Apparently Samsung's 12ms response time/ "no ghosts seen" is helped by
some trick circuits that "massage" the fast action motion.

They mention it on their website as a feature, but they don't really
say much about what they're really doing.
!