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Overheating C2D E6600

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December 11, 2007 6:24:16 AM

Hey There,

I just installed a new 8800 GT PCI-E video card into my PC, and straight afterwards im getting about 10c more for both cores.. both running about 53c idle (CPU is E6600 C2D, B2 Stepping, Not Overclocked stock HSF.) GPU core sitting about 50c.. the problem is.. when playing a game like Call of Duty 4 etc. my CPU Cores jump up to 60-65c and then im getting lag because my motherboard is changing the CPU Clock Speed from 2.4Ghz to 1.6Ghz on both cores, because the temp is so high.

Do you think i should up or lower voltage on anything to fix this?
or anything else you might no of, and no i don't have any custom cooling.\

Thanks,
Knaxx.

More about : overheating c2d e6600

December 11, 2007 6:31:39 AM

Check that your CPU Heatsink/Fan is properly seated still. Maybe some of the pins that holds the heatsink in place on the motherboard have come undone.
December 11, 2007 6:34:23 AM

I already tried re seating the HSF today and the pins.. i am thinking it maybe a power issue, i only have a 500W power supply.

Running 1 HDD, CD/DVD Optical Drive and a Card Reader.. 3 fans plus power supply and CPU/HS Fan.
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December 11, 2007 6:36:54 AM

I would say 95% its because of your 8800GT. Personally, I think 8800GT's cooler is ill-designed, as it dumps waste heat back into the case, as opposed to vent out towards the back (dual slot).

I have similar experience, but not CPU. With Geforce 6600, my MB is around 30C. But since I swapped it out for a 8800GTS (dual slot), the MB temperature jumped 10C. During game, MB jumps another 10-15C.

Solution:
If you aren't against spending more bucks, getting some case fan to improve air flow will be a good idea. If this persists, you can also get an aftermarket cooler (although since you don't OC, its overkill) for E6600. On the other hand, 8800GT aftermarket coolers are also a good idea.

If you just want to utilize what you have at the moment, simply improve air flow, and if desired, take off the side panel.
December 11, 2007 6:42:21 AM

Case is completely removed, i have like 4 fans in the case already.

One in the front, below harddrive, One in back.. i think both are 12mm or so.. then i have a side panel fan which is 8mm. Then the CPU has one.

You suggest getting a aftermarket GPU cooler for the 8800, anyway last question is.. is my 50-55 idle temp for CPU and video card dangerous? and when it hits the 60+.. should i turn off the PC to avoid damage to card and CPU, when i first installed the card i was getting 80c.. untill i took the card out and placed it in properly.
December 11, 2007 6:54:03 AM

That's interesting... so does CPU HSF has direct contact with fresh air? If that's the case, then you might want to consider getting some thermal compounds, and reseat the heatsink. Also, what's the ambient temperature?

Aftermarket cooler for 8800GT only makes sense if the problem is entirely 8800GT, which I'm not sure at the moment. Although it is likely G92's problem, but I can't say for sure. So in the meantime, try to see if CPU cooler is properly attached, with fresh thermal compound. You can get them at Fry's for about 4 bucks.

As for damages, it is indeed dangerous to run your CPU around 60~70C. You should get 50~55C for load, and 40ish for idle. G92 can take quite an amount of heat, so it should be fine. With stock cooler, my 8800GTS idle at 72C, and load at 8x.

EDIT:
I just realized, how you can test if the CPU cooler is seated right or not. If possible, feel the temperature of the heatsink. If it is indeed warm, and a little bit hard to touch, your CPU HSF is seated right and functioning properly. If its just warm, and easy to touch, then you might want to consider replacing the thermal compound.
December 11, 2007 7:03:41 AM

I changed my Voltage on the CPU back abit, stock was 1.3250v and now its like 1.19-- something v and its back running at 40-41 IDLE on both cores.

Maybe the 8800GT is sucking too much power from my pitty PSU and thats why it was overheating? oh and the GPU is idle at 51c.

Ambient temperature on the video card? via speefan, or room ambient...
Ambient temp for Card is 42 and Room temp is like.. 25-26c
December 11, 2007 7:25:29 AM

Did an stress test using ORTHOS, the idle temp for both cores was about 41.. after 1-2 minutes into the test the cores reached 70c.

Im seriously wondering if my CPU needs a new cooler or like you said reseating with some paste..
December 11, 2007 7:36:25 AM

Knaxx said:
Did an stress test using ORTHOS, the idle temp for both cores was about 41.. after 1-2 minutes into the test the cores reached 70c.

Im seriously wondering if my CPU needs a new cooler or like you said reseating with some paste..


You can feel the heatsink, and see if it is consistent with the read out. If it doesn't feel right, then you might want to get new thermal compounds. If it does feel right, then you should be looking at

1. significant improvement of case air flow

or

2. new HSF for CPU.
December 11, 2007 7:41:55 AM

I have a 8800GT and I find that you need very good case air flow. Around the proc I have 2 120m fans venting out and 1 80m fan blowing over the CPU and north bridge. I then have 120m fan blowing over the HDD and the 8800GT and have no problems what so ever. The cpu fan doesn't even come on in idle because it is so cool.
December 11, 2007 8:05:33 AM

Thanks for the information guys and sorry if i am bothering or wasting your time follow members/moderators, i just don't know much about a CPU and Overclocking what so ever but from what i have read so far from replies from you guys and reading the sticky's is very helpful.

Yomamafor1 i am planning on getting a new HSF for the CPU so i can overclock in the future and im going to also invest in a new case with better cooling solutions for my system (Bigger PSU also)...

After all the fiddling around i have got my temps to 37c for both cores on idle which is safe going by the table, haven't tested general gaming for scores but i did another stress test and after 10 minutes Small FFTs the max the cores got to was about 64-65c at 100% usage/stress on the CPU.

Is this better i mean the idle is but what about with 100% stress?? is 64-65c safe?

December 11, 2007 10:19:48 AM

Knaxx said:
Thanks for the information guys and sorry if i am bothering or wasting your time follow members/moderators, i just don't know much about a CPU and Overclocking what so ever but from what i have read so far from replies from you guys and reading the sticky's is very helpful.

Yomamafor1 i am planning on getting a new HSF for the CPU so i can overclock in the future and im going to also invest in a new case with better cooling solutions for my system (Bigger PSU also)...

After all the fiddling around i have got my temps to 37c for both cores on idle which is safe going by the table, haven't tested general gaming for scores but i did another stress test and after 10 minutes Small FFTs the max the cores got to was about 64-65c at 100% usage/stress on the CPU.

Is this better i mean the idle is but what about with 100% stress?? is 64-65c safe?


Yes, only if you don't stress it often. Don't peg your CPU at 100% 24/7, then you should be fine. Personally, I opt for high 40s~low 50s for maximum load, but yours should do.
December 11, 2007 11:35:04 AM

I too have E6600 revision B2. It too does almost ~70°C when stressed. But i guess the problem lies in the HSF which is a POS, atleast mine. It has a molding error, or what ever you want to call it. A bump in the bottom of the heatsink which is clearly present, so only a really really small portion of the heatsink actually touches the prosessor.
It doesn't matter to me because this cheap-o mobo can't be used for overclocking :) 
December 11, 2007 11:49:36 AM

And almost missed this one.
Knaxx said:
my CPU Cores jump up to 60-65c and then im getting lag because my motherboard is changing the CPU Clock Speed from 2.4Ghz to 1.6Ghz on both cores, because the temp is so high.

Actually that has nothing to do with the temp's being so high. Atleast not at those temps. It is the Intel Speedstep kicking in and dropping your multiplier from 9 to 6 (9x266 = 2400 and 6x266 = 1600) and dropping the prosessor voltage. Power saving feature when you're not stressing your prossesor. It can be disabled if you want to.
December 11, 2007 6:29:03 PM

Knaxx remember when you had you computer parts out side your case when your temps for CPU were 34C those temps are what your should be getting inside your case and if your temps change from 34C to 70C inside you case, you have the wrong PC case for your components. Sure when you add another component to the system like an 8800GT which might I add runs very hot as it is. Those 8800GT's GPU cores run hotter than the 8800GTX's and these GTX's already run HOT.

See now that you have added another component, you have introduced more heat to your hole computer. I bet if you were to remove your 8800GT from your PC case your temps would settle down, when ever you add a new component to a system you introduce more heat also. It doesn't matter how many fans you have what matters is airflow, removing the heat as fast as you can. Again thoses 8800GT cores can run at 90C which I know is why your temps are SO high. Can you give us a picture of you PC case, or what case you have?

Its time to dive into your wallet and get that Antec 900, for the money you will not find a cooler PC case.
December 11, 2007 10:36:13 PM

Juuh you said, A bump in the bottom of the heatsink which is clearly present, so only a really really small portion of the heatsink actually touches the prosessor.
This is also the case with me.

systemlord
This is my case: http://www.pccasegear.com/prod3033.htm
December 12, 2007 12:33:21 AM

Knaxx said:
Juuh you said, A bump in the bottom of the heatsink which is clearly present, so only a really really small portion of the heatsink actually touches the prosessor.
This is also the case with me.

systemlord
This is my case: http://www.pccasegear.com/prod3033.htm


That case is ok, check one of these out.>>>



By systemlord at 2007-12-11
December 12, 2007 12:38:14 AM

The case the OP references is a nice case for the average pc user, but may fall short for extended gaming sessions with a hot running gpu. It's all about case ventilation, which systemlord points out, or more specifically, case volume air exchange or throughput. The referenced case appears to have just an 80mm on the side panel and unfortunately the hard drive cage mounts sideways, which allows easy hard drive access but restricts the air flow from from any input fan you might want to install. The "open throat" hard drive cages that are aligned with lower input fans are the better design, IMHO. If the side panel had a CAG tube over the cpu and an input fan pulling air down over the cpu hsf, you would in all likelihood see appreciably lower cpu temps.

I have two E6600 boxes with 8800GTXs in each, and run 32-34 °C at idle and no more than 44-48 °C under heavy gaming load at an ambient temperature of around 75 °F. One case, an Antec 640B, has two side panel fans, one a 92mm at the end of a CAG which blows straight down onto the cpu/hsf, an 80mm blowing directly below the GPU, a 120mm exhaust at the rear of the case, and a 80mm in front of the hard drive bay. The other is an old Sonata 1, with a 120mm modded to the side panel blowing directly on the gpu and north and south bridges, a 120mm on the inside surface of the the fan cage blowing directly onto the gpu, a 120mm at the rear of the box, and an Antec Spot Cool mounted to the mb and blowing directly down over the cpu HSF. Both boxes have Corsair HX520s which for me, helped to lower the interior temps because they just run a lot cooler than my old Antec NeoPower 2s. Before, and running two unmodded Sonata 1s, my idle temps for the E6600 were right at 52 °C, peaking to 65-70 °C under heavy load - just too hot!

As I see it, you have two options. One is to keep the existing case and add some modifications. Since you have a plexiglass side panel, you could mod the side panel to mount a larger fan, and mount a "Spot Cool" over the cpu/hsf to try to bring the temps down lower. Adding a 120mm fan in front of the hard drive bay would help a little also, in spite of the 90 ° orientation of the drive cage. You could also exchange the PSU for a robust "name brand" one having a good active PFC rating, which would run cooler in the case therein contributing less to the heat problem.

The other option is to buy a new case, one that will give you the kind of heat exchange that allows you to run all componenets at lower temps and therein increase the lifetime of all your components. The Antec 900 would really cool your system down.

Just my 2 cents...and good luck!
!