Core voltage not at what i set in BIOS (680i)

Hi all. I'm currently trying to OC my x6800 atm. I have a eva 680i mobo.

Right now I'm @ 3.5Ghz. anything higher is unstable, and I'm thinking that this voltage deal may be the culprit.

So I'm setting my VCore to 1.400 in BIOS. Right next to it, it says "actual value" and it says 1.36. The weird thing is that out of all the voltages I've changed, the vcore is the only one that has an "actual value" different than what i've manually set it to. It's also the only value that's green colored in BIOS.

CPUz gives a vcore of 1.360 idle and 1.352 load.

So my question is this, why is it lowering the voltage when i obviously need it higher?

thank you.
11 answers Last reply
More about core voltage bios 680i
  1. the lower volt is a thing called vdroop that stop the vcore voltage go over the voltage you set.this is a protection mechanism to protect against voltage spikes.its normal.set higher to compensate the vdroop to reach your desire vcore.
  2. icewolf69 said:
    Hi all. I'm currently trying to OC my x6800 atm. I have a eva 680i mobo.

    Right now I'm @ 3.5Ghz. anything higher is unstable, and I'm thinking that this voltage deal may be the culprit.

    So I'm setting my VCore to 1.400 in BIOS. Right next to it, it says "actual value" and it says 1.36. The weird thing is that out of all the voltages I've changed, the vcore is the only one that has an "actual value" different than what i've manually set it to. It's also the only value that's green colored in BIOS.

    CPUz gives a vcore of 1.360 idle and 1.352 load.

    So my question is this, why is it lowering the voltage when i obviously need it higher?

    thank you.


    Most boards get lower voltage readings in Windows. Your value is bad for typical motherboards, but normal for 680i, which is a bad overclocking board.

    It's technically not vdroop. Vdroop happens only when cpu is on full load. Your voltage will drop further when on full load, as vdroop sets in.
  3. so is the CPU running on the vcore i SET, or the one the bios and cpuz is telling me it's at?

    I just don't want to set my vcore too high and fry the chip or anything
  4. icewolf69 said:
    so is the CPU running on the vcore i SET, or the one the bios and cpuz is telling me it's at?

    I just don't want to set my vcore too high and fry the chip or anything



    It's lower than the one you set. Cpuz is telling the real value in Windows. But keep in mind, when you boot up, it's on the high voltage. So you should use that for judgement on max safe vcore.
  5. I believe the voltage shown under windows is the correct value, however some applications will give you a more accurate voltage reading than others.

    If you feel unsure about increasing the core voltage past your current max, just don't. Perhaps in the future you will have an easier time with a better motherboard.
  6. dagger said:
    Most boards get lower voltage readings in Windows. Your value is bad for typical motherboards, but normal for 680i, which is a bad overclocking board.

    It's technically not vdroop. Vdroop happens only when cpu is on full load. Your voltage will drop further when on full load, as vdroop sets in.


    it is vdroop.didnt you read its OP it says drop to 1.352v underload.
  7. icewolf69 said:
    so is the CPU running on the vcore i SET, or the one the bios and cpuz is telling me it's at?

    I just don't want to set my vcore too high and fry the chip or anything


    technically you cant fry you CPU like in the old days.but if you do somehow set it too high like 1.65V+ some weak silicon in the chip maybe get damaged.
  8. iluvgillgill said:
    it is vdroop.didnt you read its OP it says drop to 1.352v underload.

    The drop from 1.36 to 1.352 IS vdroop, but his first question was about the voltage showing up as 1.36v when he set it at 1.4v in BIOS, that is definitely not vdroop.
  9. evilshuriken said:
    The drop from 1.36 to 1.352 IS vdroop, but his first question was about the voltage showing up as 1.36v when he set it at 1.4v in BIOS, that is definitely not vdroop.

    Yeah, that was what I meant. Looking at that again, that vdroop seems small. Is it really 100% cpu load across all cores? For a board as bad as 680i (no offense) the vdroop should be higher.
  10. yeah it was 100% both cores. But it was only under load for a few minutes. I don't care about the vdroop, just why it's @ 1.36 when i set it to 1.40
  11. voltage offset?miscalibrated?self protection?
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