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DVI to HDMI converters. Will they do all HDMI can do ??

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Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:40:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.


I know DVI dont have sound just hook that up seperatly.


Thanks.

/ps Just don't want to buy a TV now just decover i need to buy another
one a year from now GRRRR. Like most of you do now without DVi or HDMI
connections. No HD movies for you, unless they are broadcast that is,
not on disc :( 

Bye.
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:40:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote in message
news:buhu81lcdhaebh4f3bh960f4bc1bequ3n9@4ax.com...
>
> Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
> only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
>
>
> I know DVI dont have sound just hook that up seperatly.
>
>
> Thanks.
>
> /ps Just don't want to buy a TV now just decover i need to buy another
> one a year from now GRRRR. Like most of you do now without DVi or HDMI
> connections. No HD movies for you, unless they are broadcast that is,
> not on disc :( 

You don't need DVI or HDMI to get HDTV. I have been using component video
for years, and my HDTV looks just great.
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:40:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 22 May 2005 00:40:11 +1000, On Holidays <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote:
>
> Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
> only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.

Maybe you are confusing HDMI with HDCP. Both HDMI and DVI can do HDCP,
but many DVI monitors that are not HDTV's do not. The only difference
between HDMI and DVI is that HDMI includes sound (but there are HDMI to
DVI converter cables that can split the sound out).

HDCP is a copy protection scheme to allow you to display, but not
permanently record the output.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:40:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Z Man wrote:

> "On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote in message
> news:buhu81lcdhaebh4f3bh960f4bc1bequ3n9@4ax.com...
>
>>Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
>>only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
>>
>>
>>I know DVI dont have sound just hook that up seperatly.
>>
>>
>>Thanks.
>>
>>/ps Just don't want to buy a TV now just decover i need to buy another
>>one a year from now GRRRR. Like most of you do now without DVi or HDMI
>>connections. No HD movies for you, unless they are broadcast that is,
>>not on disc :( 
>
>
> You don't need DVI or HDMI to get HDTV. I have been using component video
> for years, and my HDTV looks just great.

True, component looks fine for HD. However, if the rumor about high
def DVDs and/or Blu-Ray (BD) turns out to be true - and most watchers of
the business believe the rumor is true - you will need a DVI/HDCP or
HDMI port to get the HD signal from the high def DVD or BD player.

The current upconverter DVD players which upconvert the 480i DVD
picture to an interpolated 1080i/720p picture only do this through the
HDMI or DVI port. The component on those player is limited to 480p,
apparently because the studio leaned hard on the DVD player
manufacturers to do so. The belief is that the same will be true for the
HD DVD/BD players.

As for the subject question, DVI is a subset of HDMI. HDMI provides
for a growth path in terms of 10 or 12 bit RGB color, smarter
communications between devices for plug and play setup, and so on. If I
were buying a new HD TV, I would want my model to have at least one HDMI
port on it for future proofing. Ideally it should have 2 HDMI ports, but
not many HD TVs have this so far.

Alan F
May 22, 2005 1:48:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

David Efflandt wrote:
> On Sun, 22 May 2005 00:40:11 +1000, On Holidays <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote:
>
>>Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
>>only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
>
>
> Maybe you are confusing HDMI with HDCP. Both HDMI and DVI can do HDCP,
> but many DVI monitors that are not HDTV's do not. The only difference
> between HDMI and DVI is that HDMI includes sound (but there are HDMI to
> DVI converter cables that can split the sound out).
>
> HDCP is a copy protection scheme to allow you to display, but not
> permanently record the output.

No, he's not confused. The studios pushed for these delivery schemes so
that the signals stayed digital until they are inside the tv....their
reasoning is that copying an analog (component) signal is much easier
than copying a digital one. The copy protection stuff is just more
icing on the cake.
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 2:06:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt wrote:
> Z Man wrote:
>
>> "On Holidays" <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote in message
>> news:buhu81lcdhaebh4f3bh960f4bc1bequ3n9@4ax.com...
>>
>>> Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
>>> only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
>>>
>>>
>>> I know DVI dont have sound just hook that up seperatly.
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>>
>>> /ps Just don't want to buy a TV now just decover i need to buy another
>>> one a year from now GRRRR. Like most of you do now without DVi or HDMI
>>> connections. No HD movies for you, unless they are broadcast that is,
>>> not on disc :( 
>>
>>
>>
>> You don't need DVI or HDMI to get HDTV. I have been using component
>> video for years, and my HDTV looks just great.
>
>
> True, component looks fine for HD. However, if the rumor about high def
> DVDs and/or Blu-Ray (BD) turns out to be true - and most watchers of the
> business believe the rumor is true - you will need a DVI/HDCP or HDMI
> port to get the HD signal from the high def DVD or BD player.

That would be a rather bizarre marketing decision to make. There are few
enough owners of HDTVs to launch HD DVD, removing the majority of them
from the market would be really dumb.

Matthew (not that it couldn't happen)

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 2:56:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Matthew L. Martin wrote:

> Alan Figgatt wrote:
>
>> True, component looks fine for HD. However, if the rumor about high
>> def DVDs and/or Blu-Ray (BD) turns out to be true - and most watchers
>> of the business believe the rumor is true - you will need a DVI/HDCP
>> or HDMI port to get the HD signal from the high def DVD or BD player.
>
>
> That would be a rather bizarre marketing decision to make. There are few
> enough owners of HDTVs to launch HD DVD, removing the majority of them
> from the market would be really dumb.
>
> Matthew (not that it couldn't happen)

True. But most HD TVs sold in the one to two years have a single
DVI/HDCP or HDMI port. And it is likely that more HD TVs have sold in
the past year to year and a half than have sold combined in the years
prior to that. So by the time HD-DVD and Blu-Ray hit the market, the
number of HD TV owners with a digital port will far exceed the number of
early adopters who have component ports only. So the early adopters
would get screwed in this scenario, but what else is new?

However, how many of the HD TVs owners out there will read the manual
when they buy their new HD-DVD/BD player and realize that they need to
hook it up through the copy protected digital port to get the 1080i
picture? If this lack of component HD output come true, it is a very
good bet that a lot of them will hook it through their component cable
with a 480p output and wonder why the picture doesn't look that much
better than DVD.

Alan F
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:45:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Alan Figgatt (afiggatt@comcast.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> So by the time HD-DVD and Blu-Ray hit the market, the
> number of HD TV owners with a digital port will far exceed the number of
> early adopters who have component ports only. So the early adopters
> would get screwed in this scenario, but what else is new?
>
> However, how many of the HD TVs owners out there will read the manual
> when they buy their new HD-DVD/BD player and realize that they need to
> hook it up through the copy protected digital port to get the 1080i
> picture?

There's also the possibility that the one HDMI input might already be used
by something else (STB, etc.). Even devices with two HDMI inputs are already
heading towards obsolete if HDMI becomes a requirement for HD-DVD.

--
Jeff Rife | "Ahhh, what an awful dream! Ones and zeroes
| everywhere...and I thought I saw a two!"
| -- Bender, "Futurama"
Anonymous
May 22, 2005 4:48:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Curmudgeon (curmudgeon@buzzoff.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> David Efflandt wrote:
> > On Sun, 22 May 2005 00:40:11 +1000, On Holidays <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote:
> >
> >>Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
> >>only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
> >
> >
> > Maybe you are confusing HDMI with HDCP. Both HDMI and DVI can do HDCP,
> > but many DVI monitors that are not HDTV's do not. The only difference
> > between HDMI and DVI is that HDMI includes sound (but there are HDMI to
> > DVI converter cables that can split the sound out).
> >
> > HDCP is a copy protection scheme to allow you to display, but not
> > permanently record the output.
>
> No, he's not confused.

No, he is confused, and so are you.

An HDMI input (by itself) doesn't guarantee that the device supports HDCP
over the digital video input. In the same way, DVI instead of HDMI
doesn't automatically mean device does *not* support HDCP on that input.

HDCP is an add-on to both HDMI and DVI, just as David wrote in his
response.

--
Jeff Rife | Sam: What d'ya say to a beer, Normie?
|
| Norm: Hi, sailor...new in town?
May 23, 2005 8:52:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 22 May 2005 10:06:53 -0400, "Matthew L. Martin"
<nothere@notnow.never> wrote:

>> True, component looks fine for HD. However, if the rumor about high def
>> DVDs and/or Blu-Ray (BD) turns out to be true - and most watchers of the
>> business believe the rumor is true - you will need a DVI/HDCP or HDMI
>> port to get the HD signal from the high def DVD or BD player.
>
>That would be a rather bizarre marketing decision to make. There are few
>enough owners of HDTVs to launch HD DVD, removing the majority of them
>from the market would be really dumb.

And when has the entertainment industry been smart about technology?

This is already a reality with upconverting players. Precious few
upconvert over anything but the digital output.

There is no doubt that HD DVDs will only produce an HD signal on the
HDMI output. I'm sure they will also have component connections, but
they will be downconverted to 480p.
Anonymous
May 23, 2005 11:38:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

DaveR wrote:
> On Sun, 22 May 2005 10:06:53 -0400, "Matthew L. Martin"
> <nothere@notnow.never> wrote:
>
>
>>> True, component looks fine for HD. However, if the rumor about high def
>>>DVDs and/or Blu-Ray (BD) turns out to be true - and most watchers of the
>>>business believe the rumor is true - you will need a DVI/HDCP or HDMI
>>>port to get the HD signal from the high def DVD or BD player.
>>
>>That would be a rather bizarre marketing decision to make. There are few
>>enough owners of HDTVs to launch HD DVD, removing the majority of them
>
>>from the market would be really dumb.
>
> And when has the entertainment industry been smart about technology?

Who is talking about the entertainment industry. The subject is the
hardware interconnect.

> This is already a reality with upconverting players. Precious few
> upconvert over anything but the digital output.

They are yet another DVD player. They are just incremental revenue for
the manufacturer. HD resolution DVD players are a new product for a
niche market. Making the size of that market small is just plain dumb.

> There is no doubt that HD DVDs will only produce an HD signal on the
> HDMI output. I'm sure they will also have component connections, but
> they will be downconverted to 480p.

Do you have a source for this conjecture?

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
Anonymous
May 24, 2005 5:13:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Iam waiting for an 86cm HD Widescreen CRT Tv to come out with HDMI
inputs or DVD in Australia. Toshibia has one but its only in the Staes
or Europe or somthing :( 


And yes it does look lik eto get HD movies you will need either DVi or
HDMI inputs, You will probably be able toplay them on componate ot
whatever but you won't get 720p or 1080i so it will be just 480p at
best :( 

But the magority will be fooled and say WOW HD movies are great :)  Or
if they are the same as a normal DVD quality.

Many people will be mad when this happens as well. As it will mean to
get HD movies you will have to buy ANOTHER TV and thats the only way.
Unless you can do some electonics and fit the ports yourself. iam sure
its possible,

Bye.




On Sun, 22 May 2005 12:48:49 -0400, Jeff Rife <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote:

>Curmudgeon (curmudgeon@buzzoff.net) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
>> David Efflandt wrote:
>> > On Sun, 22 May 2005 00:40:11 +1000, On Holidays <abbyrow.com.uk> wrote:
>> >
>> >>Just been reading the HD movies ect will be encoded or somthing and
>> >>only HDMI has the stuff to unclode or or somthing.
>> >
>> >
>> > Maybe you are confusing HDMI with HDCP. Both HDMI and DVI can do HDCP,
>> > but many DVI monitors that are not HDTV's do not. The only difference
>> > between HDMI and DVI is that HDMI includes sound (but there are HDMI to
>> > DVI converter cables that can split the sound out).
>> >
>> > HDCP is a copy protection scheme to allow you to display, but not
>> > permanently record the output.
>>
>> No, he's not confused.
>
>No, he is confused, and so are you.
>
>An HDMI input (by itself) doesn't guarantee that the device supports HDCP
>over the digital video input. In the same way, DVI instead of HDMI
>doesn't automatically mean device does *not* support HDCP on that input.
>
>HDCP is an add-on to both HDMI and DVI, just as David wrote in his
>response.
!