Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Failure to POST, what do I RMA?

Last response: in Systems
Share
December 6, 2007 3:09:33 PM

I'm building my wife a new computer for her birthday. I've done this before, most recently when I built my own system a few months ago. I have an error I've never encountered before, though, and am hoping for some advice to figure out what I've done wrong, or more likely, what I need to RMA.

After the system was assembled, I powered it on. The case LEDs and the power supply fan, graphics card fan and case fans (powered off connections to the MB) turned on. They remain on for 2-4 seconds, then everything shuts off and remains off for 2-4 seconds before powering back on. The system then continues to cycle until I shut it off at the power supply switch. The fan for the CPU heatsink does not activate, except for a brief twitch as the system goes into the off portion of it's cycle. I never get any POST beeps.

I swapped out the power supply with the one from my own computer with exactly the same results, so the power supply is not the problem. I've double-checked all the connections.

I've also carefully examined the whole thing for tumors, but cancer is not the answer. :kaola: 

Components, in case it's relevant:
Case: Cooler Master Centurion 534 RC-534-kkn2-gp
MB: Gigabyte GA-p35-ds3p Rev 2.0
PS: SeaSonic S12 II SS-500
CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo e6750 Conroe 2.66 GHz
Graphics: PNY GeForce 8800GT 512 Mb

Thanks in advance for sharing your expertise.

More about : failure post rma

December 6, 2007 3:27:43 PM

Hi welcome to the forums! What a nice present to spoil your wife with on her birthday. Sorry that you are having problems with it though. You didn't list memory as one of your components.You did buy memory didn't you? :-)
December 6, 2007 4:01:48 PM

If the issue isn't RAM, did you use stand-offs in the case?
Related resources
December 6, 2007 4:05:12 PM

Yes, I didn't list everything in the system, just those components I thought might be able to prevent the system from even POSTing.

Remaining components:
Memory: Crucial Ballistix 2 Gb (2x1Gb) 240pin ddr2 SDRAM (PC2 6400)
Samsung 1.44Mb 3.5" internal floppy drive
Samsung 20x DVD+/-R DVD Burner SATA model SH-s203B
Seagate Barracude 7200.10 ST3320620as SATA (two, will be in RAID if I can ever get the system to POST)
December 6, 2007 4:06:58 PM

Yes, I installed the stand-offs that came with the case. For this MB, there are 9 stand-off attachment points.
December 6, 2007 4:14:08 PM

RAM in the wrong motherboard slot will prevent your system from posting.

*edit* For what it's worth - You can double check the Power & Reset SW and make sure there isn't anything wrong or defective with them.
December 6, 2007 4:26:12 PM

Best place to start TS'ing a system... Take the MB out and run it on cardboard or even on the box it came in. Try one stick of ram, then the other.

If it was your 1st time building a 775 socket:

Intel CPU Installation

Just to be sure you start off without heat problems, when using the stock HSF, take a look at the bottom of the MB to be sure the push pins are through and locked:

December 6, 2007 6:56:16 PM

I built a very similar system 4 months ago without any problems, so although it's certainly possible I've done something wrong (heatsink fan installation, RAM in wrong spot, etc.), I doubt it. I've checked the things you've suggested without improvement. I do appreciate the suggestions.

How would I check the power and reset switches for functionality? (I do own a multimeter, but haven't used it for computer work previously.)

Also, I have another CPU (from my own computer) which would work in this motherboard. If I put my own CPU into this MB to try to sort out where the issue lies, do I run a risk of damaging the working CPU?
December 6, 2007 7:20:09 PM

I'm assuming that you reset the CMOS, if not try that. Use the pins near the battery, consult the manual. If that doesn't work, then unplug all unnecessary connections e.g., case headers, USB, HD, DVD, keyBd, Mouse, etc. Leave only RAM, VGA, PSU and CPU fan. short the PWR header on the mobo with a paper clip or screw driver. if that doesn't work, then build it outside of case on some cardboard.
December 8, 2007 9:45:02 PM

I traced the problem to a faulty reset switch. After removing all case leads from the MB, I was able to start the system normally by shorting the power switch leads. Restoring the power switch case leads did not replicate the problem, but replacing the reset switch lead did. Examining the switch itself, I discovered a bent electrode that might have been shorting the switch. Unbending that electrode fixed the issue.

This leaves me with one remaining question. As part of the troubleshooting process, I removed the CPU heatsink and fan and reseated them. Do I now need to remove the previous thermal grease and replace it, or can I leave the original (Intel Factory) tape/grease in place?
December 9, 2007 1:12:39 AM

Supposively the thermal pad that is on the bottom can be reused, since its more like a wax, and re-ments to form a seal. Thats what it looks like to me, and I remember reading it somewhere.

But if you do have any thermal grease around, it might be best to remove what is on there, and apply new thermal grease on it. Usually anytime you break the seal, its best to replace it so you have a good interface of thermal grease to transfer heat better.
December 9, 2007 3:46:09 PM

spitz said:
I traced the problem to a faulty reset switch. After removing all case leads from the MB, I was able to start the system normally by shorting the power switch leads. Restoring the power switch case leads did not replicate the problem, but replacing the reset switch lead did. Examining the switch itself, I discovered a bent electrode that might have been shorting the switch. Unbending that electrode fixed the issue.

This leaves me with one remaining question. As part of the troubleshooting process, I removed the CPU heatsink and fan and reseated them. Do I now need to remove the previous thermal grease and replace it, or can I leave the original (Intel Factory) tape/grease in place?
Congratulations, that could have been a real nightmare to find. I never looked, but I'm positive that the TIM on the Intel HS melts after it gets hot, so you should change it. Get some AS5 or whatever is handy. Here is a pic of what Intel says about disturbing the TIM.
Edit: If it looks identical to the fresh one in the pic you could probably reuse it.

ATX Installation Instructions for Boxed Intel® Core 2 Extreme Processor in the 775-Land Package




!