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Help building a Ubuntu/Linux PC

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December 10, 2007 2:31:12 AM

Hello. I am looking to build my own computer and am utterly confused. I went to NewEgg looking to add some things to my cart with a list of what I thought I needed, and I never could tell if part A would work with part B, and if all the parts together would work seemlessly as a whole. Not to mention if they'd even work well with Ubuntu as the only/primary OS. I don't want to spend a whole lot, but I do want one that's nicely equiped for gaming, media, etc. Can anyone help? I'm pretty sure I want a dual core Intel processor, nVidia video card (maybe around 8600), at least 2GB RAM, and at least a 250 or 320GB hard drive at 7200rpm. I know what primary parts I want, I just get lost when finding cases, and power supplies, motherboards, and the like. Whatever bits of insight anyone could provide would be most appreciated.

(Oh, and to note the only things I have to really go toward a new system would be a monitor. In addtion to what I mentioned above, I'd still need a sound card, DVD RW drive, DVD/CD drive, and a USB and Ethernet card. I think that's what I need anyway. I should probably just buy one prebuilt, but it's so hard to find decent one's built around Ubuntu/Linux.)

More about : building ubuntu linux

December 10, 2007 3:25:26 AM

Well, forget gaming on Linux. If you want to game, Windows is the ONLY OS for gaming.
December 10, 2007 4:37:20 AM

i hav ubuntu and it does not run exe applications
Related resources
December 10, 2007 5:09:55 AM

Ubuntu/Linux really supports a TON of hardware. Chances are if you build a system all the hardware will work without an issue. My current computer which is just made of parts that I could afford without any thoughts about compatibility. I decided to install Ubuntu 7.10 and the only I had to install was the graphics driver from NVIDIA.

Quick note here NVIDIA has better driver support right now for Linux. Save yourself some problems and make sure to get an NVIDIA card. Do a little reading about uninstalling the basic NV driver and Install the linux driver from nvidia's web site.
December 10, 2007 5:12:28 AM

runswindows95 said:
Well, forget gaming on Linux. If you want to game, Windows is the ONLY OS for gaming.


It really depends on the game..... I play a few older games with no issues at all on Linux.
http://www.winehq.org/
December 10, 2007 5:23:38 AM

You can run .exe files, just not natively. You need WINE.

Also for sound and ethernet... most current kernel builds will include built in support for most hardware. (USB, sound and ethernet are built in to the motherboard). Ubuntu will probably need a connection to the internet to download nvidia drivers (it can install the latest ones automatically for you). So just keep that in mind.

You should probably forget about gaming on linux, especially if your a noob to linux. Consider dual booting linux and windows (just use windows to game).

My suggestion:
Get a cheap AMD or Intel processor and mobo
corsair 450vx power supply
2gb of ram
8600gts
get a good case, coolermaster makes good ones for ~$50
Samsung S203B SATA dvd drive (its awesome)

So yeah, its not too difficult... hardware support is very good in current linux builds.

Tips: stay with nvidia video cards, pick a decent case, and dualboot with windows for gaming.
December 10, 2007 5:46:02 AM

Stay away from the 8600gts, it's the biggest ripoff of the century. You may aswell spend a few bucks more and get the HD3850, or spend a few quite a lot less and get the 8600gt.

You should look at the Antec Sonata III, it comes with a 500 Watt truepower PSU and is a great looking case. Only around £60.
December 10, 2007 6:01:08 AM

I second Skittle's approach. Other than Quake Wars, the newer games will not run on Linux until the DRM cracks come out. The games themselves would actually run under Wine, but the DRM software will not. This usually takes a year or so. You'll still have to buy the game, install it under Wine, and then apply the crack.

I have played most of the previous version FPS games under Wine with no trouble on a stock E4300, 7600gt, and 2gb ram. Somebody gave me a copy of Vista Home Basic, so I run that now for the newer games, and use a separate Linux box for everything else.(see my HW profile)

I have found Ubuntu and PCLinuxOS 2007 to be compatible with just about any hardware around. I would do your homework before buying a printer though.
December 10, 2007 6:06:49 AM

quantumsheep said:
Stay away from the 8600gts, it's the biggest ripoff of the century. You may aswell spend a few bucks more and get the HD3850

Only one problem. No Linux drivers for the HD3000 series yet. Even the 2000 series and older drivers are still problematic at best. Right now, Nvidia is the only sensible approach for Linux.

AMD keeps promising improvement, but none yet.
December 10, 2007 6:10:31 AM

ir_efrem said:
Quick note here NVIDIA has better driver support right now for Linux. Save yourself some problems and make sure to get an NVIDIA card. Do a little reading about uninstalling the basic NV driver and Install the linux driver from nvidia's web site.

Actually installing the Nvidia driver in Ubuntu 7.10 takes just a couple of mouse clicks right after install.
December 10, 2007 6:13:48 AM

quantumsheep said:
Stay away from the 8600gts, it's the biggest ripoff of the century. You may aswell spend a few bucks more and get the HD3850, or spend a few quite a lot less and get the 8600gt.

You should look at the Antec Sonata III, it comes with a 500 Watt truepower PSU and is a great looking case. Only around £60.


obviously you have never tried running linux before... or you would know that ATI cards are a massive headache. Also, whats with people bashing the 8600 all of a sudden? the 7600 used to be a sweet midrange card... and the 8600 is quite a bit better than it in most games.

I never liked the sonata, and that corsair PSU is much superior than that bundled psu
December 10, 2007 6:15:56 AM

tlmck said:
Actually installing the Nvidia driver in Ubuntu 7.10 takes just a couple of mouse clicks right after install.


does it still need to download them? I know it used to.
December 10, 2007 6:17:29 AM

skittle said:
does it still need to download them? I know it used to.

Yes. The difference is you do not have to navigate through the Nvidia web site as you would in Windows. Ubuntu goes out and gets it itself from the repositories.
December 10, 2007 11:25:04 PM

the ones that ubuntu gets be itself are open-source and ubuntu techs say it themselves that the open-source driver for graphics is slower than the closed source you can get from Nvidia/Ati
December 11, 2007 8:54:20 AM

imrul said:
the ones that ubuntu gets be itself are open-source and ubuntu techs say it themselves that the open-source driver for graphics is slower than the closed source you can get from Nvidia/Ati

This tool is also a good option. I have not tried it on 7.10, but it worked great on 7.04. http://albertomilone.com/nvidia_scripts1.html
December 11, 2007 11:50:19 AM

To second what the other lads are saying, do your research now and get hardware that you know is supported.

Linux, in general, is a lot better with hardware than Windows so long as it's supported. If it isn't then it can be a nightmare.

Printers in particular can be difficult. LCD's used to be a challenge as well but I think they're a lot better now.

I assume you'll be using Beryl?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xC5uEe5OzNQ&feature=rela...

Not sure how much video card power you need for all the effects but I'm sure any flavour of 8600 will be more than enough.
December 11, 2007 12:20:56 PM

About hardware: pretty much anything works with Linux nowadays, and it actually defines Plug'n'Play like this: plug hardware - use hardware (Vista is more like: plug hardware - load driver - driver rejected - look for another driver - driver installed but not loaded - system rebooted - driver rejected on load - reboot - BSOD; personal experience with a brand new Belkin Wi-fi uSB dongle 'Vista-Ready').
Currenlty, non-PnP compatible Linux does Plug'n'Play; Windows does Plug'n'Pray.

Aside that, about video card drivers:
- Nvidia's binary driver is still top of the cream on Linux; their support is unmatched.
- Ati's proprietary drivers have recently gotten waaaay better: hardware support has gone right up here, and 6 months of development have tripled system speed. Latest driver does support HD3xxx cards, but they are not yet in Ubuntu repositories.

Currently, Free drivers:
- Nvidia: company-supported nv driver has basic 2D acceleration; Nouveau driver has pretty much complete 2D acceleration over a large range of cards and some very basic 3D support, but it's still not for the faint of heart.
- Ati: any Radeon card up to the X850 has 2D and 3D support; performance is lower than with binary, but it has better support for multiple screens. Cards in the HD range have 2D support for now, but the next few months will yeld much better support, as AMD releases specifications under no NDA.
December 11, 2007 12:46:28 PM

Iain1974 said:
Not sure how much video card power you need for all the effects but I'm sure any flavour of 8600 will be more than enough.


A GMA950 has enough power to run beryl (1280x800) with all the transparency, cube, and animations + full screen DVD, openoffice, and youtube. All of this with just 512mb of ram and a celeron 410. An 8600 will be WAY more than enough.
December 11, 2007 6:14:48 PM

skittle said:
A GMA950 has enough power to run beryl (1280x800) with all the transparency, cube, and animations + full screen DVD, openoffice, and youtube. All of this with just 512mb of ram and a celeron 410. An 8600 will be WAY more than enough.

I have run Beryl on a Nvidia 64mb MX440 card in PCLinuxOS 2007. When that card finally died, I replaced it with a 6200 256mb. Beryl runs beautifully.

I have also seen it run well on the GMA950 you mention.
December 11, 2007 8:30:20 PM

Thanks to those that have responded. I've found the parts I want at NewEgg, but get confused when it comes to power supplies, motherboards, and how to know if this product or that product will work together. I don't know. It seems like simple task, but I guess I'm not bright enought to handle it because it's become so maddening. I see a case I like, then I literally struggle trying to determine if the power supply I found will fit, and how much wattage I need, and so forth. Are there any good guides online detailing what components you need and how they work together when trying to build your own system? Maybe that wouldn't even help. I guess I should just buy one prebuilt. Well, thanks again for all of the input.
December 12, 2007 12:28:47 AM

magicant said:
Thanks to those that have responded. I've found the parts I want at NewEgg, but get confused when it comes to power supplies, motherboards, and how to know if this product or that product will work together. I don't know. It seems like simple task, but I guess I'm not bright enought to handle it because it's become so maddening. I see a case I like, then I literally struggle trying to determine if the power supply I found will fit, and how much wattage I need, and so forth. Are there any good guides online detailing what components you need and how they work together when trying to build your own system? Maybe that wouldn't even help. I guess I should just buy one prebuilt. Well, thanks again for all of the input.

Give us a budget, and we can name specific components to fit. Until then I will just throw out this medium spec rig. It will be very fast in Linux, and will run games reasonably well. It will also be upgradeable. The price/components can be adjusted up or down depending on the budget.

Antec NSK4480B Black Computer Case w/380W Power Supply - Item #: N82E16811129032 - $69.99

GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L Motherboard - Item #: N82E16813128059 - $96.99

PNY 7900GS 256MB Video Card - Item #: N82E16814133186 - $119.99

Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 Allendale 2.2GHz - Item #: N82E16819115031 - $127.99

CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) DDR2 800 Memory- Item #: N82E16820145590 - $67.00 - $30 MIR = $37.00

Western Digital Caviar SE 320GB SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - Item #: N82E16822136098 - $74.99

Sony NEC Optiarc 20X DVD±RW SATA - Item #: N82E16827118002 - $25.99

Subtotal: $582.94 - $552.94 after rebate.

The case/PSU combo is very good quality. The PSU has 27a on the 12v rail which is good for all but the highest end vid cards. It is also a well balanced system, meaning all the components should play well together.
December 12, 2007 12:33:18 AM

I wouldnt suggest running a 7900gs on a 380w PSU...
December 12, 2007 4:13:17 AM

skittle said:
I wouldnt suggest running a 7900gs on a 380w PSU...

You may be thinking of the GT. This PSU is more than enough. 7900gs specs say 20a on the 12v rail, and 350w. This PSU has 27a. It is not so much about the total PSU watts anymore. It is about the 12v watts an amps. The newer PSUs are heavy on the 12v and lighter on 3.3 and 5v.
December 12, 2007 11:00:00 PM

tlmck said:
Give us a budget, and we can name specific components to fit. Until then I will just throw out this medium spec rig. It will be very fast in Linux, and will run games reasonably well. It will also be upgradeable. The price/components can be adjusted up or down depending on the budget.

Antec NSK4480B Black Computer Case w/380W Power Supply - Item #: N82E16811129032 - $69.99

GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS3L Motherboard - Item #: N82E16813128059 - $96.99

PNY 7900GS 256MB Video Card - Item #: N82E16814133186 - $119.99

Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 Allendale 2.2GHz - Item #: N82E16819115031 - $127.99

CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB) DDR2 800 Memory- Item #: N82E16820145590 - $67.00 - $30 MIR = $37.00

Western Digital Caviar SE 320GB SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - Item #: N82E16822136098 - $74.99

Sony NEC Optiarc 20X DVD±RW SATA - Item #: N82E16827118002 - $25.99

Subtotal: $582.94 - $552.94 after rebate.

The case/PSU combo is very good quality. The PSU has 27a on the 12v rail which is good for all but the highest end vid cards. It is also a well balanced system, meaning all the components should play well together.


Wow again! Thanks a bunch for putting all of that together. As for the total, it really depends. Ideally I'd like to keep it around $500 if I'm building it myself, as any higher I'd just as soon order one prebuilt. However, I want a quality machine well capable of most things, so I don't mind spending more that $500. No more, I think, than say $700-800? What I played around with over at NewEgg.com cam in at close to $1000. Way more than I want to pay, but I have a hard time figuring out what I really need and so forth. Even though Ubuntu isn't really equiped to allow games to be played, I would like a machine that can handle the latest, not necessarily excel at it, but handle them decently. I've never had a system that I could play true 3D games on, and even though I do most of my gaming on my Wii/DS, I'd like the option. Other than gaming, the only other things I do are internet, music, and other such mild tasks.

I'll be looking over the various components you listed to see what is said about them. I actually was looking at one of the Antec cases, the Sonata I think, as it featured an energy efficient power supply. And I was considering, I think, the same motherboard you listed - though I think it's sold out currently. Again, thanks a bunch for checking into this for me. As leary as I am about building my own, I do think the idea sounds fun and would be somewhat rewarding (if I came out ahead in getting a good deal). You listed a Sony DVD drive, but I'm kind of against Sony products. What do you think about Lite-On or ASUS? I used to think Plextor was the best, but I've come to find out that they are no longer the quality company they used to be.

Here's what I put together late last night for fun:

Case + Power Supply:
Antec Sonata Plus 550 Black/ Silver Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case 550W Power Supply, Item#:N82E16811129037

Motherboard:
GIGABYTE GA-P35-DS4 Rev. 2.0 LGA 775 Intel P35 ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
Ultra Durable 2, ultra cooling, Item#:N82E16813128064

Processor:
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 Kentsfield 2.4GHz 2 x 4MB L2 Cache LGA 775 Quad-Core Processor, Item#:N82E16819115017

Video Card:
XFX PVT84JUDF3 GeForce 8600GT 256MB 128-bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 SLI Supported Video Card, Item#:N82E16814150230

Hard Drive:
Western Digital Caviar SE16 WD5000AAKS 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive, Item#:N82E16822136073

Memory:
G.SKILL 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory, Item#:N82E16820231098

DVD/CD Drive:
ASUS Black 20X DVD+R 8X DVD+RW 8X DVD+R DL 20X DVD-R 6X DVD-RW 14X DVD-RAM 16X DVD-ROM 48X CD-R 32X CD-RW 48X CD-ROM 2MB Cache SATA 20X DVD±R DVD Burner with LightScribe, Item#:N82E16827135156

Sound Card:
bluegears b-Enspirer 7.1 Channels 24-bit 192KHz PCI Interface Sound Card, Item#:N82E16829127002

Whew. I think that covers most everything. Oh, do most motherboards feature an ethernet card/port? I don't need to buy a PCI ethernet card or USB cards, right? If I am reading the specs of the motherboards right, they include such connections on board. I know most of what I have listed above is overkill for what I'll be doing on it, and it is more than I want to spend (roughtly around $1000), but I'm happy with each component. I chose each one by selecting best rating or most reviews, and searching for award winning products - plus brands I am familiar with and in reading many of the reviews. Add to the fact that I don't even know if all this is a) compatible with each other and b) if it'll all work with Ubuntu.

So, based on what was suggested to me and what I have listed, does anyone have any additional comments? Perhaps to find a happy medium?

Thanks again for entertaining my posts!
December 13, 2007 12:48:34 AM

magicant said:
You listed a Sony DVD drive, but I'm kind of against Sony products. What do you think about Lite-On? I used to think Plextor was the best, but I've come to find out that they are no longer the quality company they used to be.

Okay, on to review what you've listed and do so more research!

Actually the DVD RW drive is NEC. Sony just got their name attached through a marketing deal. Mine is very smooth and quiet, not the fastest, but not the slowest. I too would avoid a pure Sony drive. Just ain't what they used to be. I have used NEC's for years and have no complaints. Lite-on is good, but generally noisy.

With the exception of the power supply and a slightly slower GPU/CPU, I have the identical rig(see my "informations"), and am very pleased with it. Before I got my free copy of Vista Home Basic(the only way I would own it), the machine ran Ubuntu 7.04, and PCLinuxOS 2007. It is now strictly a Vista gaming rig, and I do all other computing on the Celeron Linux box.

Once again, for the newer games, you will still need Windows unfortunately. The newer DRM/antipiracy stuff will not run on Linux, and without it, you cannot run the game. I would create a 60gb partition, install Windows XP and games on it, and then install Ubuntu after that for a dual boot setup.

Lastly, you could shave a few dollars off the above build by dropping to a E2180 processor, and a smaller hard drive. I still run 160gb myself. This would save about $60 right off the bat, and only be slightly slower.
December 13, 2007 1:02:06 AM

tlmck said:
With the exception of the power supply and a slightly slower GPU/CPU, I have the identical rig(see my "informations"), and am very pleased with it. Before I got my free copy of Vista Home Basic(the only way I would own it), the machine ran Ubuntu 7.04, and PCLinuxOS 2007. It is now strictly a Vista gaming rig, and I do all other computing on the Celeron Linux box.

Once again, for the newer games, you will still need Windows unfortunately. The newer DRM/antipiracy stuff will not run on Linux, and without it, you cannot run the game. I would create a 60gb partition, install Windows XP and games on it, and then install Ubuntu after that for a dual boot setup.

Lastly, you could shave a few dollars off the above build by dropping to a E2180 processor, and a smaller hard drive. I still run 160gb myself. This would save about $60 right off the bat, and only be slightly slower.


Thanks again for your input. I really wanted to avoid relying on Windows, but I guess I could just try it for a while with Ubuntu only, and then later on add in Windows in a dual boot format. Though, in regards to dual booting, if I did as you suggest and sectin of a portion of the hard drive for Vista, would that isolate to that section of the hard drive and keep it form spilling over to other parts of my computer? (If that makes any sense.)

Also, I edited my post while you were responding it seems, and I wanted to see what you thought of my mock home built system I put together for fun at NewEgg last night. As I mentioned in my post, it's waaaay more than I could ever need, but I kind of got carried away and hate settling for things.

Again, thanks for your input. You've been most helpful.
December 13, 2007 1:23:46 AM

magicant said:
Though, in regards to dual booting, if I did as you suggest and sectin of a portion of the hard drive for Vista, would that isolate to that section of the hard drive and keep it form spilling over to other parts of my computer? (If that makes any sense.)


Yes, vista and linux wont write to each others partitions unless you tell them to.
December 13, 2007 1:32:35 AM

Your build would be fine, but I would vote against Gskill ram. I have seen more negative posts than positive, especially as it pertains to Gigabyte boards. That could be why it is not on the Gigabyte approved list. You would be better off with Corsair or Crucial ram. And, if you are not planning to overclock, you can get by fine with the non-heatspreader "value ram" version. It will work just as well and save a few dollars.

I also don't see where that sound card is Linux compatible. Neither Newegg, nor Blue Gears list Linux. The on Gigabyte board HD audio is compatible after DL and installing the Linux drivers from Realtek.
December 13, 2007 1:33:37 AM

No, the partitions will not interfere with each other. They use different file systems. But with the latest Ubuntu you get access to all partitions because it now supports read/write with NTFS.
December 13, 2007 1:40:25 AM

skittle said:
Yes, vista and linux wont write to each others partitions unless you tell them to.

They will be separated. Linux can read, but not write to NTSF file system. Windows will not read or write to Linux drive unless you DL a special program which i have not tried.

A cheap way to get Vista is to go to Amazon.com and get an upgrade copy of Vista Home Basic for around $50. You can then use this procedure to do a clean install. http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/winvista_upgrade_c.... Of course, if you do not own a copy of Windows 2000, or XP, this is technically piracy.

Regardless, I would still do the partition and install Windows first, followed by Ubuntu.
December 13, 2007 2:13:19 AM

tlmck said:
They will be separated. Linux can read, but not write to NTSF file system.


Linux can write to NTFS using a couple of different methods. Im pretty sure its built into current kernels (NTFS 3G).
December 13, 2007 2:38:08 AM

skittle said:
Linux can write to NTFS using a couple of different methods. Im pretty sure its built into current kernels (NTFS 3G).

I should have been more specific. I tried it a few times with Music and Video files and got garbage. Maybe just my machine, but I think I will wait a couple more revs.

At any rate, i don't think the OP will need it anyway. He can use Windows for games, and Linux for everything else as I do.
December 15, 2007 2:24:25 AM

Just a few more things...

Has anyone had any luck with this case:
Antec NSK1380 Black/ Silver Steel MicroATX Cube Computer Case 350W Power Supply, Item#:N82E16811129038
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

... Or one like it?

Also, are there any drawbacks to a microATX motherboard? Well, other than the limited slots and ports and so forth. Do they perform as well? Also, I wonder if this case would get too hot with just one fan and no other real means of cooling or ventilation. I don't know. I'm leaning towards a smaller form factor now so I can keept it on my desk. I wish I could find something like the system76 Koala or the Mac mini. But getting things that small would really limit my options. I guess that's why I kind of like this Antec one. It seems to be a happy medium.

Oh, and I asked this before, but I don't think it was answered, so forgive me for asking again, but when a motherboard lists it's ports and so forth, that specically means it will have ports for the back of the sysetm ready for USB, ethernet, and the like, right? Also, is RJ-25 the ethernet port? So I sould just plug my cable/dsl modem into that?

Thanks again to all those that have responsed thus far along the way.
December 15, 2007 4:08:50 AM

My recommendation is to try a few disto's do not just limit yourself to one :) 

I just installed Mandriva on my notebook after giving up on Ubuntu (had huge problems getting it to work on my Gateway MX3230) but Mandriva 2008.0 all I had to do was get my wireless working with the ndis wrapper. The set up was just point and click... was almost too easy.

If I was building a PC for Linux I honestly would buy cheap on almost everything except the mother board. Linux will run happy on the most out dated junk imaginable. Using my laptop as an example it has a 1.5Ghz Celeron M and 256MB's of shared ram but Mandrive and Ubuntu both ran fine. (Ubuntu just had a couple of issues I could not live with and was not proficient enough to fix myself) It actually has more features and looks better and runs faster then XP that it replaced. Since it was notebook games where not what I wanted to do so Linux made more sense.
December 15, 2007 7:55:32 AM

magicant said:
Just a few more things...

Has anyone had any luck with this case:
Antec NSK1380 Black/ Silver Steel MicroATX Cube Computer Case 350W Power Supply, Item#:N82E16811129038
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

... Or one like it?

Also, are there any drawbacks to a microATX motherboard? Well, other than the limited slots and ports and so forth. Do they perform as well? Also, I wonder if this case would get too hot with just one fan and no other real means of cooling or ventilation. I don't know. I'm leaning towards a smaller form factor now so I can keept it on my desk. I wish I could find something like the system76 Koala or the Mac mini. But getting things that small would really limit my options. I guess that's why I kind of like this Antec one. It seems to be a happy medium.

Oh, and I asked this before, but I don't think it was answered, so forgive me for asking again, but when a motherboard lists it's ports and so forth, that specically means it will have ports for the back of the sysetm ready for USB, ethernet, and the like, right? Also, is RJ-25 the ethernet port? So I sould just plug my cable/dsl modem into that?

Thanks again to all those that have responsed thus far along the way.

That case will be fine as long as you do not go any higher end on the components, especially the vid card. The heat and PSU requirements would not allow it.

uATX is perfectly fine as long as you can live with the limitations you mentioned. In general, they are not made for the enthusiast/overclocker, but for stock speed medium duty rigs, they are just fine. As such, you will not find any uATX board sporting performance chip sets like the P35, X38, etc... You could easily drop down to the P-31, G33, etc...

The MB will have ports on the back as well as internal header connectors to connect to the front panel ports. The RJ-45 will be on the back and that is where you plug in the modem.
January 18, 2013 12:17:45 AM

ir_efrem said:
It really depends on the game..... I play a few older games with no issues at all on Linux.
http://www.winehq.org/

Steam's a coming
!