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Going balder by the day! Please help me choose a CPU cooler

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May 14, 2008 3:16:31 PM

I am ordering an Intel E8400 cpu, Gigabyte GA-EP35-DS3L motherboard, and Antec 900 case. I have been researching and struggling for weeks deciding on an aftermarket cooler for this combination. I will decide on one, then jump to another, then another. Here are my criteria and what it has to accomplish:

1) Has to be compatible with GA-EP35-DS3L motherboard(i.e. not interfere with capacitors, memory, heatsinks, etc.) and Antec 900 case.

2) I have never installed a socket LGA775 cpu before. I hear the push-pins are a nightmare. So I would prefer a better attachment mechanism(i.e. bolt kit) than the push-pins. Unless the push-pins are not as bad as people make them out to be.

3) I will NOT be overclocking this processor to start. In the future, I may slightly overclock it, but nothing extreme. Maybe 20% overclock at most I would think.

4) Price range needs to be less than $60.00

I have been looking at the following(other suggestions are more than welcome):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Please help me find one that is easy and stable to install and will fit and function properly with my cpu/motherboard/case combination. Thank-You!
a c 133 à CPUs
a c 141 V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
May 14, 2008 3:44:58 PM

The Xigmatek (#2 on your list) has gotten some excellent reviews.

I'm one of those who has never had a problem with the pushpins. As long as you check the back of your mobo to see that they are all the way through and properly locked down, they should not work loose. I don't move my system around much though, so I don't put a lot of stress on mine. If you're going to take your system to LAN parties, a stronger method may be better.
May 14, 2008 3:57:44 PM

I used the Zalman cnps8000 on my e8400 in a GA-EP35-DS4. Fit like it was made for the board (the DS4, not sure about the DS3L). I came to the conclusion that while the e8400's stock cooler was way to small (I mean like ridiculously small) it did not warrent a huge cooler.

I know the 8000 got a bad rap in the past but that was earned with the older, hotter, chips like the PD805 that produced tons of heat. It works great with my e8400, lowered load temps 10C over stock cooler, and is very quiet.

I should also mention that I got a refurbished unit for $21 from the "refurbdoc" on ebay ($13 shipping + $8 cooler). I'm pretty sure "refurbdoc" is Zalman. My evidence:
1) items carry full zalman warranty
2) package came with everything including thermal paste, Zalman sticker, and all retail packaging.
3) Upon tracking the package I noticed it shipped form Zalman USA in CA.
4) Came in a Zalman branded brown box.

In short, check it out. Just do an ebay search for Zalman and look for "refurbdoc" as the seller.

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May 14, 2008 4:25:39 PM

Of the four heatsinks listed, I'd go with number two, the Xigmatek, same as jtt283 suggested. It has a design similar to some of the other towers which has proven to be effective. The Zalmans are OK, but not up to the job if you do any serious overclocking. I've read that the the Zerotherm is good as well, but not quite as good as the Xigmatek.
May 14, 2008 4:33:39 PM

Yeah, the Zerotherm Nirvana was my first choice because of the mounting system, but am now leaning towards the Xigmatech. I have contacted them about the Crossbow bolt-thru kit they offer. Daniel@Xigmatek said that the retail version should be available from distributors in a week or so. The only problem is that this is holding up my build. So, I either have to use it and use the push-pins, or opt for another cooler that has a bolt thru type mechanism. That is my main dilemna right now. Would hate to get one with push-pins and have it not work or have issues, and then have to order another type anyways, and have it hold up building the system even longer. I will see if I get any more feedback and then make my decision. Thanks!
May 14, 2008 5:39:26 PM

I have the 9500 and I love it. It was very easy to install. It works great. It does get held on by screws.
May 14, 2008 5:55:16 PM

There's a Scythe bolt-through system that people have discussed on here before that is completely compatible with the Xigmatek cooler. I'd check the Scythe website. I just ordered one for my soon-to-arrive Xigmatek S1283 myself (though if I'd realized the Crossbow was going to be available so soon I'd've just waited. Oh well, it's under the motherboard so who cares?)
May 14, 2008 5:55:44 PM

Go with # 2.
May 14, 2008 6:07:59 PM

I agree #2 looks like a very good cooler. My suggestion would be the AC freezer 7pro. Though it only has the push pins on it. This cooler runs for around $25 or less. Check http://arctic-cooling.com
May 14, 2008 6:13:40 PM

Just a thought, but if you're not going to overclock, use the stock one. I did that when I set up my E8400, and it works fine, and is dead silent. Much easier to install than my Scythe Ninja too.

Of course, if you bought the OEM version and have no HS, ignore all this...

Clint
May 14, 2008 6:29:40 PM

+1 for the Xigmatek S1283. I have one and love it! Also, with regards to your statement that you may OC, but only 20%....OCing is like Pringles...once you pop, you just can't stop! Be prepared to get wrapped up in the fun and the challenge of OC'ing, and you've definitely selected a processor that was built for overclocking. Have fun!
May 14, 2008 7:32:45 PM

Based on the feedback, I think I am going to go with the Sigmatek HDT-S1283. I will give it a few more days, and see if the Crossbow bolt kit is available. If not, might try to hunt down the Scythe kit and see if it will work. If all else fails, I am doing a complete build, so will attempt the push pins. At least the motherboard will be bare and I can see if they "lock" in or not correctly. My only fear is that I will break the motherboard, as I have never worked with this system/socket type. Just as a side question, when installing the cooler, the best way is to set it on top of the anti-static wrap it came with on a flat surface? Or is there a better procedure? Thanks again and sorry for all the newbie questions. Last computer I built was a socket 939 lol.
May 14, 2008 7:51:04 PM

goatfarmer said:
Last computer I built was a socket 939 lol.


Long live 939!!!
May 14, 2008 7:58:01 PM

HDT-S1283 FTW... the cpu cooler goes over the heatsink on my DS3L and doesn't touch the RAM. should be fine in your case but read some reviews to be sure. Great cooler :D 
May 14, 2008 8:12:45 PM

stabgotham said:
+1 for the Xigmatek S1283. I have one and love it! Also, with regards to your statement that you may OC, but only 20%....OCing is like Pringles...once you pop, you just can't stop! Be prepared to get wrapped up in the fun and the challenge of OC'ing, and you've definitely selected a processor that was built for overclocking. Have fun!


Truer words have never been spoken.
May 14, 2008 8:38:54 PM

+1 Xigmatek, excelenmt cooler. works fine on my DS3L. Pushpins are a pain in the ass but you can always buy a backplate mounting kit, I think thermalright makes one that works with the 1283.
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
May 14, 2008 9:05:59 PM

sailer said:
Of the four heatsinks listed, I'd go with number two, the Xigmatek, same as jtt283 suggested. It has a design similar to some of the other towers which has proven to be effective. The Zalmans are OK, but not up to the job if you do any serious overclocking. I've read that the the Zerotherm is good as well, but not quite as good as the Xigmatek.

Agreed with the XIGMATEK HSF.

See:
http://www.frostytech.com/top5heatsinks.cfm#INTELHEATSI...
May 14, 2008 9:19:52 PM

The Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro has a Thermal Resistance of 0.17°C/Watt.
The lower that number, the better it is at removing heat.
On many coolers this number is not given or hard to find.
Everything else but low noise, is just FAP.
May 14, 2008 10:12:28 PM

I'm quite sure the Xigmatek SD964 would beat the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro for around the same price, even though I haven't seen a direct comparison.
May 15, 2008 1:17:14 AM

homeriv said:
I used the Zalman cnps8000 on my e8400 in a GA-EP35-DS4. Fit like it was made for the board (the DS4, not sure about the DS3L). I came to the conclusion that while the e8400's stock cooler was way to small (I mean like ridiculously small) it did not warrent a huge cooler.

I know the 8000 got a bad rap in the past but that was earned with the older, hotter, chips like the PD805 that produced tons of heat. It works great with my e8400, lowered load temps 10C over stock cooler, and is very quiet.

I should also mention that I got a refurbished unit for $21 from the "refurbdoc" on ebay ($13 shipping + $8 cooler). I'm pretty sure "refurbdoc" is Zalman. My evidence:
1) items carry full zalman warranty
2) package came with everything including thermal paste, Zalman sticker, and all retail packaging.
3) Upon tracking the package I noticed it shipped form Zalman USA in CA.
4) Came in a Zalman branded brown box.

In short, check it out. Just do an ebay search for Zalman and look for "refurbdoc" as the seller.

I bought a vga cooler from the same seller. Sweet price and it worked perfect.

Might be worth a go at zalman just for the lower price you can get from refurbdoc :p 
May 15, 2008 8:09:57 AM

Zalman makes some nice looking coolers. ...but you can find way more effective cooling for the same or less $$ and for a lot less noise, I don't know why they call the Zalman 9500 & 9700 quiet (I've had or have both). I also have a couple of their VGA coolers on some older cards...BIG upgrade from the nVidia stock units with a lot lessnoise.
May 16, 2008 5:53:08 PM

Thanks! That looks quite informative and helpful. Will look into it when I complete build.
!