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How important it is to choose a chipset that supports PCIe 2.0?

Last response: in Overclocking
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May 19, 2008 4:58:04 AM

I am currently looking for a new mobo and since I usually keep the same mobo+chip for 3 years, I am wondering how important it is to choose a chipset that supports PCIe 2.0? I will still use my current graphic card nVidia 8800GT (that supports PCIe 2.0) and will probably give it an upgrade in 1.5 years' time. By then, I am pretty sure PCIe 2.0 would be a de facto.

I am set for an Intel Core 2 Quad (Q9450) processor. Just confused over the chipset. P35 doesn't support PCIe 2.0. nForce 750i does but I read better reviews on the Intel chipsets than the nVidia ones. Please help.
May 19, 2008 5:56:53 AM

Well, It depends on if you wanna use the added bandwidth of the PCIe 2.0 compliant standard. Since its backwards compatible with 1.1, I guess if you plan on adding a more power card later, then get it, if you are making a final build with no intentions of adding more stuff, don't!

--Lupi
May 19, 2008 6:17:15 AM

It's not really important right now and probably won't be for a year or 2. I don't believe that there's any video card out there right now that can fully use that much bandwidth.
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May 19, 2008 6:19:07 AM

Lupi, I'm not sure how the rest of the population does it. For me, the mobo+processor usually outlasts the graphic cards I have. So I find myself changing graphic cards more often than mobo+processor that I usually keep for 3 years.

Having said that, the PCIe 2.0 compliant mobos are pretty step in pricing and I am leaning towards a P35 chipset. Not sure if I would regret one or two years down the road when PCIe 2.0 becomes a de facto standard.

Anyone has the same dilemma as me?
May 19, 2008 6:21:26 AM

If you can spare the price, then get it, just in case later all you can spare to get is a new Vid card. So why not. That way it becomes more powerful for the newer chipset card, and the added bandwidth. That would make it last longer as far as playing games and high end junk goes.
May 19, 2008 6:21:40 AM

ALANMAN said:
It's not really impotant and probably won't be for a year or 2. I don't believe that there's any video card out there right now that can fully use that much bandwidth.


Alanman - Interesting point. Thanks. I am still trying to read up on what the roadmap of PCIe 2.0 is going to be. So much to read up! How technology moves ...
May 19, 2008 6:43:05 AM

Lupiron said:
If you can spare the price, then get it, just in case later all you can spare to get is a new Vid card. So why not. That way it becomes more powerful for the newer chipset card, and the added bandwidth. That would make it last longer as far as playing games and high end junk goes.


True. If I go for PCIe 2.0 compliant mobos, seems to me that my options are either (a) nForce 7-series (which I read issues with nVidia drivers) or (b) Intel X-series (which is pretty pricy at the moment).

I guess there is a reason why the Intel P35 chipset is still popular today ...
May 19, 2008 6:53:21 AM

This is an area where one has to basically just make a prediction.
With the support to nVidia by Intel slacking off over the last year or so, because Intel wants to have a better presence in the hi end computer video arena. Nvidia will be the odd man out when it comes to chipsets.
True to our statement, the Intel chipsets do seem to perform better over all.
Though most of the new higher end video cards coming out take advantage of PCIe2.0. I really don't see the need for it right now. I would say sometime down the road like 18 months or so.
I don't recall exactly but I think the Intel CPU road map has a new socket coming out in the same time frame. Right now the X38/X48 chipsets don't show the needed bang for buck, that would convince me to buy one over a P35. I mean $100 gets you a great motherboard where the X series start at almost $100 dollars more.
If I wanted to build a good system today I would start with a P35 board and one of the currently available quads, 4 gig of good ddr2 800 and keep the 8800GT.
May 19, 2008 7:05:22 AM

bobbknight said:
This is an area where one has to basically just make a prediction.
With the support to nVidia by Intel slacking off over the last year or so, because Intel wants to have a better presence in the hi end computer video arena. Nvidia will be the odd man out when it comes to chipsets.
True to our statement, the Intel chipsets do seem to perform better over all.
Though most of the new higher end video cards coming out take advantage of PCIe2.0. I really don't see the need for it right now. I would say sometime down the road like 18 months or so.
I don't recall exactly but I think the Intel CPU road map has a new socket coming out in the same time frame. Right now the X38/X48 chipsets don't show the needed bang for buck, that would convince me to buy one over a P35. I mean $100 gets you a great motherboard where the X series start at almost $100 dollars more.
If I wanted to build a good system today I would start with a P35 board and one of the currently available quads, 4 gig of good ddr2 800 and keep the 8800GT.


Bobbknight - You are right. In fact, I am eyeing on the Q9450 (I was thinking, 45mn ... why not?) and intend to keep the 8800GT. While you have mentioned DDR2 800, I am curious, why not DDR2 667 instead? My vendor told me that the FSB of the Core 2 Quad is 1333. Getting a DDR2 667 would match that nicely (something to do with dual channel and hence 667 x 2 = 1334). May I know your view on that?
!