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Help! :| First Time Builder

Last response: in Systems
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December 14, 2007 8:32:27 PM

Okay, here goes I bought everything in this list:

SAPPHIRE 100215L Radeon HD 3870 512MB 256-bit GDDR4 PCI Express 2.0 HDCP Ready CrossFire Supported Video Card
Seagate Barracuda 7200.11 ST3500320AS 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive
ASUS P5E LGA 775 Intel X38 ATX Intel Motherboard
Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 Conroe 2.66GHz LGA 775 Dual-Core Processor Model BX80557E6750
ARCTIC COOLING Freezer 7 Pro 92mm CPU Cooler
COOLER MASTER Centurion 532 RC-532-SKN1 Black Aluminum bezel, SECC chassis ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
COOLER MASTER eXtreme RP-500-PCAR ATX from factor 12V V2.01 500W Power Supply
G.SKILL 4GB(2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F2-6400CL5D-4GBPQ

and from what I can see I've hooked everything up correctly! but the computer isn't booting up. There is no onboard sound card so I would'nt hear any post beeps. Don't know what the problem could be some help asap would be nice ;) 

More about : time builder

December 14, 2007 9:05:40 PM

Well for a first time buyer you did pretty well with your choice of parts.

OK, so your computer won't start up. Now do the fans spin up or does the system not power on at all?

-Pwnage
December 14, 2007 9:22:41 PM

Beofre powering up I notice that the LED on the motherboard is litup so I know it has power. I turn on the computer and all of the fans start up (heatsink fan, case fan,vidcard fan) for about 5 seconds the fan spins and I wish it would startup but it doesn't go to bios or anything it just powers off. About 6 seconds later again it restarts itself trying to boot up again
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December 14, 2007 10:50:48 PM

I'd start with the CPU, which may not be seated properly and overheating, which will cause it to shut off the computer. It could be other things as well Best to disassemble it including taking the mobo out of the case. Take everything out and reinstall the CPU, 1 stick of RAM and the video card and see if it starts. Make sure you have both the 24 and 4 plugs attached. If so, insert the other stick. Put the mobo back in the case making sure you have the exact number of standoffs, no more and no less and make sure the you have a screw for each standoff. Test the machine after you attach each piece.
December 14, 2007 11:32:54 PM

g-paw

I have to disagree with this statement.

"I'd start with the CPU, which may not be seated properly and overheating"

Yes, the CPU may be seated incorrectly, however if this were the case it would be quite obvious. The LGA775 socket only allows for the CPU to be inserted one way. If it is installed the wrong way it is noticeable. Overheating is even more unlikely as it would take about 5 minutes for the CPU to reach a temp that it considered dangerous. But while I'm on this point, did you buy thermal paste for the CPU fan or did the CPU fan come with some? If either one of these are true then did you apply it?

Anyway every thing else I agree with, more or less. If you put too many mother board standoffs in the case then the mother board could making connection with one of the standoffs that shouldn't be there and could be grounding out.

MAKE SURE YOU PUT A PIECE OF FOAM UNDER THE MOTHERBOARD! (not yelling just trying to emphasize :)  ). This will make sure you won't damage the motherboard.
December 15, 2007 11:20:02 AM

pwnage said:
g-paw

I have to disagree with this statement.

"I'd start with the CPU, which may not be seated properly and overheating"

Yes, the CPU may be seated incorrectly, however if this were the case it would be quite obvious. The LGA775 socket only allows for the CPU to be inserted one way. If it is installed the wrong way it is noticeable. Overheating is even more unlikely as it would take about 5 minutes for the CPU to reach a temp that it considered dangerous. But while I'm on this point, did you buy thermal paste for the CPU fan or did the CPU fan come with some? If either one of these are true then did you apply it?

Anyway every thing else I agree with, more or less. If you put too many mother board standoffs in the case then the mother board could making connection with one of the standoffs that shouldn't be there and could be grounding out.

You're right about the CPU, what I meant to say was that the HSF might not be seated properly. Not sure about Intel, currently all my machines are AMD, but with AMD, if the HSF is not seated properly the machine will immediately shut off, learned this by experience :( 

MAKE SURE YOU PUT A PIECE OF FOAM UNDER THE MOTHERBOARD! (not yelling just trying to emphasize :)  ). This will make sure you won't damage the motherboard.

December 15, 2007 6:50:25 PM

tried all of the above, even tried resetting the cmos. Did excatly as the mobo manual said, re-installed the battery and now it won't power up at all.
December 15, 2007 9:50:13 PM

Make sure both the 24 pin power connector and 8 pin CPU power connector are plugged in. Make sure the switch on the back of the PSU is set to On. If you're using a surge protector, make sure it's On. Check the wire from the On/Off button on the case is connected correctly.
December 16, 2007 11:24:41 AM

I had much the same problem with a Gigabyte board (reinstalled only the basics needed to boot) swapped out PSU and memory - reset the CMOS - and etc - finally returned the board.

Good luck
December 16, 2007 11:40:03 AM

Ranger007 said:
I had much the same problem with a Gigabyte board (reinstalled only the basics needed to boot) swapped out PSU and memory - reset the CMOS - and etc - finally returned the board.

Good luck


If everything is connected properly and turned on, agree it makes sense to RMA the board. I wouldn't sour on Gigabyte if the board is bad because all companies no matter how good they are can produce a bad item.
!