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MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM

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Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:14:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

New to HDTV and want to watch broadcast HDTV on my PC and do
away with expensive Cable TV or Satellite TV service.

It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
signals?

MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?

Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
about them and help me make the right purchase decision?
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:14:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular (anti-cingular@wireless.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
> Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
> be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
> signals?

Yes.

> MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
> Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
> MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?

Hardware MPEG-2 decoding. You can run the MyHD card on hardware as
wimpy as a PIII 800MHz and get smooth playback.

> Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
> about them and help me make the right purchase decision?

The MyHD software is far better than the Fusion software. I've had about
one messed-up MyHD recording in the last year (out of about 300), while
I can rarely get the Fusion to correctly record at all.

--
Jeff Rife |
| http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/RhymesWithOrange/ReadyForA...
Anonymous
May 28, 2005 11:53:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular wrote:
> New to HDTV and want to watch broadcast HDTV on my PC and do
> away with expensive Cable TV or Satellite TV service.
>
> It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
> Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
> be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
> signals?
>
> MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
> Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
> MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?
>
> Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
> about them and help me make the right purchase decision?

NEITHER! We are testing two 5th gen PCI card receivers. One was tested
yesterday and will be further tested in the coming days. Another is
being shipped on Monday and we will test it as soon as we get it.

Both are 5th gen LG based PCI cards and they may perform as good as the
LG STB we tested last summer. Both will be in production in days, weeks
or a month at most.

So wait!

Here are the results of my test yesterday in my apartment with clear
line of sight to the Empire State Building. We will test far more
difficult locations over the next week. This test was very promising. As
soon as we test next week the manufacturer will allow us to tell all. As
it is they would like a second chance to improve performance if the test
doesn't go as well as we hope.

Last STB test on May 3rd at my apartment...(of STB)

Received seven physical channels with a dual bow tie aimed at the Empire
State Building 40 some blocks away.

2-1 56 at 100%
4-1 28 at 100%
4-2
5-1 44 at 91 - 100%
5-2
7-1 45 at 100%
7-2
9-1 38 at 97 - 100%
9-2
11-1 33 at 100%
11-2
41-1 40 at 100%


Test today of first 5th gen PCI card at my apartment... (actually yesterday)

The scan showed 21 hits which as of now I don't know the meaning of.

The list of found channels then showed 17 program channels and 9
physical channels

2-1 56 at 94%
4-1 28 at 96%
5-1 44 at 95-96%
7-1 45 at 89-90%
9-1 38 at 95%
11-1 33 at 96%
41-1 40 at 87-88%
12 at 0-64%
53 at 0-0%

Moved dual bow tie 13% to right of Empire State Building and

53 at 94%
12 at 0-64%

rest the same

Will test at Mark's as soon as he is available.

Next PCI card shipping to me on Monday.

No new developments on second STB we tested last.

Bob Miller
Related resources
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:13:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular <anti-cingular@wireless.com> wrote (in part):

>New to HDTV and want to watch broadcast HDTV on my PC and do
>away with expensive Cable TV or Satellite TV service.
>
>It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
>Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
>be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
>signals?
>
>MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
>Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
>MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?
>
>Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
>about them and help me make the right purchase decision?

I have the MyHD MDP-120 (OTA only) and MDP-130 (OTA and unscrambled
cable) in separate computers. I've only read about the Fusion. Some
people buy both brands to have two HDTV tuners in the same computer.
Two MyHD cards cannot coexist, but a MyHD and a Fusion can.

Bob Miller said not to get either but to hold out for one with an LG
5th generation tuner, which apparently helps if you have severe
multipath problems. The Fusion card you cited has that tuner. It's
not shipping quite yet, but DC is taking preorders. Don't know if
that is one of the cards Miller is testing.

I don't have a multipath problem and have no trouble getting the local
digitals, including one running very low power, using my old attic
antenna system. When I take the computer to work, I just set a whip
antenna on a window ledge and get them with no problem.

Other than the 5th gen issue, the big difference is that the MyHD
cards decode MPEG2 in hardware, while I believe the Fusion cards do it
in software. Hardware decoding greatly reduces the load on the
processor. When I use the card to watch TV I see no slowdown in other
operations. Even if the computer locks up, the MyHD card continues to
work until I reboot.

I chose the 120 based on user comments in various groups, particularly
AVSForum. I bought the 130 because of my good experience with the
120. I sprang for the DVI daughter cards for both, which pushed the
price over $300. Support is very good through AVSForum. Trouble
reports and suggestions for improvement get back to the designers, who
seem genuinely interested in improving their products and software.

The card I've read the most negative comments about is the ATI HDTV
Wonder. And it's the same complaint I've heard (and experienced) for
years with ATI video cards: good hardware, poor software.

If multipath is a problem for you, wait for Bob Miller's test results.
If not, it's a non-issue. Decide if hardware decoding is worth the
extra money to you.

You probably have some idea what OTA analog reception is like where
you live. If it's good, digital will probably be good as well. But
go to www.antennaweb.org and plug in your Zip+4 to find out where the
transmitters are and what kind of antenna you'll likely need to
receive them.

Del Mibbler
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:13:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Del Mibbler" <mibbler@nycap.rr.com> wrote in message
news:e4hi911m2ahafb1c8dpef1ppnv91jfskcn@4ax.com...
> anti-cingular <anti-cingular@wireless.com> wrote (in part):
>
>>New to HDTV and want to watch broadcast HDTV on my PC and do
>>away with expensive Cable TV or Satellite TV service.
>>
>>It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
>>Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
>>be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
>>signals?
>>
>>MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
>>Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
>>MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?
>>
>>Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
>>about them and help me make the right purchase decision?
>
> I have the MyHD MDP-120 (OTA only) and MDP-130 (OTA and unscrambled
> cable) in separate computers. I've only read about the Fusion. Some
> people buy both brands to have two HDTV tuners in the same computer.
> Two MyHD cards cannot coexist, but a MyHD and a Fusion can.
>
> Bob Miller said not to get either but to hold out for one with an LG
> 5th generation tuner, which apparently helps if you have severe
> multipath problems. The Fusion card you cited has that tuner. It's
> not shipping quite yet, but DC is taking preorders. Don't know if
> that is one of the cards Miller is testing.
>
> I don't have a multipath problem and have no trouble getting the local
> digitals, including one running very low power, using my old attic
> antenna system. When I take the computer to work, I just set a whip
> antenna on a window ledge and get them with no problem.
>
> Other than the 5th gen issue, the big difference is that the MyHD
> cards decode MPEG2 in hardware, while I believe the Fusion cards do it
> in software. Hardware decoding greatly reduces the load on the
> processor. When I use the card to watch TV I see no slowdown in other
> operations. Even if the computer locks up, the MyHD card continues to
> work until I reboot.

Del,

Just curious about your computer specs. Do you have a newer faster computer
or something a bit more midline? I'm running an Athlon XP 2700 for my home
media stuff and was curious if you think it has enough poop for a software
based HD decoding card? I'd imagine the latest and greatest computers out
there now would have more than enough power so it shouldn't be much of an
issue moving forward.
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 4:31:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Tomaras (tomaras@tomaras.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> Just curious about your computer specs. Do you have a newer faster computer
> or something a bit more midline? I'm running an Athlon XP 2700 for my home
> media stuff and was curious if you think it has enough poop for a software
> based HD decoding card?

That processor is about equivalent to a P4 2.8GHz (give or take). Even
with the right video card, you'd still likely have some dropped frames on
1080i material, based on my P4 2.6GHz with GeForce FX 5200 Ultra. The
NVidia "FX" line is the best for the Fusion software decoding (at least
according to the many users over at AVS Forum), and I still couldn't get
smooth software playback with the Fusion II, and the CPU usage was nearly
50%.

The same machine has a MDP-130 in it now, and uses about 3% CPU during
playback, with zero dropped frames. It's also infinitely easier to get
output to standard HDTVs using the MyHD, since it has connectors on the
back that output VGA, component, or DVI digital:

1920 x 1080 / 60i
1280 x 720 / 60p
720 x 480 / 60p
720 x 480 / 60i
1440 x 1080 / 60i
1024 x 768 / 60p
1360 x 768 / 60p
1280 x 1024 / 60p
800 x 600 / 60p
864 x 480 / 60p
1280 x 768 / 60p

Notice the native resolution support for a lot of ED and HD flat panels.
You can also tell the MyHD to just send out whatever came in with the
"native" setting. Setting up a video card to output HDTV for the software
decoding cards can be tricky, and none can do the same thing that "native"
MyHD setting does.

--
Jeff Rife |
| http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/Dilbert/Sins.jpg
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:00:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 28 May 2005 23:22:20 -0700, "Charles Tomaras"
<tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote:

>
>"Del Mibbler" <mibbler@nycap.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:e4hi911m2ahafb1c8dpef1ppnv91jfskcn@4ax.com...
>> anti-cingular <anti-cingular@wireless.com> wrote (in part):
>>
>>>New to HDTV and want to watch broadcast HDTV on my PC and do
>>>away with expensive Cable TV or Satellite TV service.
>>>
>>>It seems that both MyHD MDP-130 and FusionHDTV5 Gold QAM at
>>>Digital Connection (http://www.digitalconnection.com/) can
>>>be used on computers. Can they both receive broadcast DTV
>>>signals?
>>>
>>>MyHD MDP-130 ($239) is much more expensive than Fusion HDTV5
>>>Gold QAM ($149). Why big price difference? What can MyHD
>>>MDP-130 do that FusionHDTV5 can't?
>>>
>>>Since I'm new to them. Can users of these cards tell me
>>>about them and help me make the right purchase decision?
>>
>> I have the MyHD MDP-120 (OTA only) and MDP-130 (OTA and unscrambled
>> cable) in separate computers. I've only read about the Fusion. Some
>> people buy both brands to have two HDTV tuners in the same computer.
>> Two MyHD cards cannot coexist, but a MyHD and a Fusion can.
>>
>> Bob Miller said not to get either but to hold out for one with an LG
>> 5th generation tuner, which apparently helps if you have severe
>> multipath problems. The Fusion card you cited has that tuner. It's
>> not shipping quite yet, but DC is taking preorders. Don't know if
>> that is one of the cards Miller is testing.
>>
>> I don't have a multipath problem and have no trouble getting the local
>> digitals, including one running very low power, using my old attic
>> antenna system. When I take the computer to work, I just set a whip
>> antenna on a window ledge and get them with no problem.
>>
>> Other than the 5th gen issue, the big difference is that the MyHD
>> cards decode MPEG2 in hardware, while I believe the Fusion cards do it
>> in software. Hardware decoding greatly reduces the load on the
>> processor. When I use the card to watch TV I see no slowdown in other
>> operations. Even if the computer locks up, the MyHD card continues to
>> work until I reboot.
>
>Del,
>
>Just curious about your computer specs. Do you have a newer faster computer
>or something a bit more midline? I'm running an Athlon XP 2700 for my home
>media stuff and was curious if you think it has enough poop for a software
>based HD decoding card? I'd imagine the latest and greatest computers out
>there now would have more than enough power so it shouldn't be much of an
>issue moving forward.
>

I'm curious about that too. Sure it's better to have
something does hardware decoding, but money is my restraint.
My PC has P4 2.60Ghz, Asus P4P800 motherboard, 1GB 400DDR
RAM, ATI AIW Raideon 8500, and lots disk space. My monitor
is a 21.3 inch LCD running at 1600 x 1200 if that matters.
Is it good enough to run the Fusion card?
Anonymous
May 29, 2005 9:00:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular (anti-cingular@wireless.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> My PC has P4 2.60Ghz, Asus P4P800 motherboard, 1GB 400DDR
> RAM, ATI AIW Raideon 8500, and lots disk space. My monitor
> is a 21.3 inch LCD running at 1600 x 1200 if that matters.
> Is it good enough to run the Fusion card?

Not without glitches on 1080i source material. You won't have a lot of
them, but you will have a few. It'll be a lot worse if your machine is
hooked up to a network and does anything in the background.

Note that the Fusion software has problems with the ATI chipset in that
you might get "bouncing" of the video. It's hard to explain, but it's some
kind of de-interlacing error. AVS Forum has info about it. The NVidia
chipsets that support DxVA don't have this problem.

But, I truly can't stress just how bad the Fusion software is. It often
won't scan for channels correctly, it has a horrible interface for setting
up recordings, and often just doesn't record correctly. For just watching
TV, it's not too bad, but the DVR function is why you would get a PC-based
system instead of an external STB.

--
Jeff Rife | "I feel the need...the need for
| expeditious velocity"
|
| -- Brain
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 7:30:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote (in part):
>Del,
>
>Just curious about your computer specs. Do you have a newer faster computer
>or something a bit more midline? I'm running an Athlon XP 2700 for my home
>media stuff and was curious if you think it has enough poop for a software
>based HD decoding card? I'd imagine the latest and greatest computers out
>there now would have more than enough power so it shouldn't be much of an
>issue moving forward.
>
Since I use MyHD cards, which do hardware decoding, almost any
computer you could buy today would do. The published minimum hardware
requirements are 800 MHz CPU if you're using the DVR capabilities, and
333 MHz if not.

My only experience with software decoding, which you can duplicate for
free, is to play transport streams with VLC. On my computers that's
too jerky to enjoy. Download some transport streams from
alt.binaries.hdtv (they're the ones with a .ts extension) and get VLC
from www.videolan.org. You don't need to download an entire show; one
or two segments (typically about 100 MB) should suffice.

For the record, the computer for my first card (MDP-120) has an Asus
A7N8X-E Deluxe MB, AMD Athlon XP 3200+, 1 GB memory. The computer was
unstable at the rated speed (and was before I installed the MyHD card)
so I slowed it drastically to make it stable. Currently running at
1.83 GHz. I'm lazy, so never researched why it couldn't run at top
speed.

I didn't have a computer handy for the second card and didn't want to
research the best bang for the buck, so had a vendor at a computer
fair assemble one while I waited. Turned out to have a WinFast
K7S741MG (or GXMG; not sure which), AMD Sempron 3000+, 512 MB memory,
running at 2.00 GHz.

Jeff Rife also responded to your question. I'm guessing his comments
about hardware vs. software decoding (and MyHD vs. Fusion) are right
on the money. Pun intended. I think the higher price of the MyHD
card is well worth it.

PS: I set it to record shows while I was on vacation for 3 weeks. It
performed flawlessly until the HDD filled up.

Del Mibbler
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 7:30:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Del Mibbler" <mibbler@nycap.rr.com> wrote in message
news:naik91lb5mj22ldotdlmti2ho67mh66dfd@4ax.com...
> "Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote (in part):
>>Del,
>>
>>Just curious about your computer specs. Do you have a newer faster
>>computer
>>or something a bit more midline? I'm running an Athlon XP 2700 for my home
>>media stuff and was curious if you think it has enough poop for a software
>>based HD decoding card? I'd imagine the latest and greatest computers out
>>there now would have more than enough power so it shouldn't be much of an
>>issue moving forward.
>>
> Since I use MyHD cards, which do hardware decoding, almost any
> computer you could buy today would do. The published minimum hardware
> requirements are 800 MHz CPU if you're using the DVR capabilities, and
> 333 MHz if not.
>
> My only experience with software decoding, which you can duplicate for
> free, is to play transport streams with VLC. On my computers that's
> too jerky to enjoy. Download some transport streams from
> alt.binaries.hdtv (they're the ones with a .ts extension) and get VLC
> from www.videolan.org. You don't need to download an entire show; one
> or two segments (typically about 100 MB) should suffice.
>
> For the record, the computer for my first card (MDP-120) has an Asus
> A7N8X-E Deluxe MB, AMD Athlon XP 3200+, 1 GB memory. The computer was
> unstable at the rated speed (and was before I installed the MyHD card)
> so I slowed it drastically to make it stable. Currently running at
> 1.83 GHz. I'm lazy, so never researched why it couldn't run at top
> speed.
>
> I didn't have a computer handy for the second card and didn't want to
> research the best bang for the buck, so had a vendor at a computer
> fair assemble one while I waited. Turned out to have a WinFast
> K7S741MG (or GXMG; not sure which), AMD Sempron 3000+, 512 MB memory,
> running at 2.00 GHz.
>
> Jeff Rife also responded to your question. I'm guessing his comments
> about hardware vs. software decoding (and MyHD vs. Fusion) are right
> on the money. Pun intended. I think the higher price of the MyHD
> card is well worth it.
>
> PS: I set it to record shows while I was on vacation for 3 weeks. It
> performed flawlessly until the HDD filled up.
>
> Del Mibbler

Thanks for the information.
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 5:20:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

How many channels can we get with either the Fushion card or
the MyHD card? One thing that I don't like about my Analog
ATI AIW 8500 is that it has only 125 channels. It didn't
work well with cable channels above 125. DTV in Spanish
(www.hitn.tv) is on channel 811, would I be able to watch it
with these two cards assuming I do get its signal from its
signal tower?

As one of you told me the cards work with broadcast DTV, but
if I orderget cable or satellite TV, can I also plug cable
TV and satellite TV signal to the card and enjoy more
channel programming?
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 5:20:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular (anti-cingular@wireless.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> How many channels can we get with either the Fushion card or
> the MyHD card? One thing that I don't like about my Analog
> ATI AIW 8500 is that it has only 125 channels. It didn't
> work well with cable channels above 125.

The MDP-130 can scan cable to some ridiculous frequency equivalent to
analog channel 250 or so. This covers the full range that any digital
cable system uses. The Fusion can't go quite as high, and does miss some
channels on some digital cable systems.

--
Jeff Rife |
| http://www.nabs.net/Cartoons/AngryTVGod.gif
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 2:02:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

anti-cingular <anti-cingular@wireless.com> wrote:

>How many channels can we get with either the Fushion card or
>the MyHD card? One thing that I don't like about my Analog
>ATI AIW 8500 is that it has only 125 channels. It didn't
>work well with cable channels above 125. DTV in Spanish
>(www.hitn.tv) is on channel 811, would I be able to watch it
>with these two cards assuming I do get its signal from its
>signal tower?

The MDP-130 scans cable channels 2-125. The LG LST-3410A STB scans up
to 135 (but there's nothing nearly that high on my system). The
channel numbers reported by the cable company are virtual channels;
the typical viewer doesn't know or care what the real channels are.
The STB supplied by the cable company takes care of the conversion.

For example, cable in my area puts the analog feed of Fox on 8, ABC on
10 and NBC on 13. It puts the HD digital feeds of all of these on the
same cable channel, 105. Fox is 105-7, ABC is 105-17 and NBC is
105-10. Those are the real channel and subchannels. But if you rent
a cable STB, you get Fox on 1808, ABC on 1810 and NBC on 1813. Note
that they've chosen numbers that incorporate the analog numbers
viewers are familiar with. The MyHD in virtual channel mode displays
these as D18-8, D18-10 and D18-13 respectively.
>
>As one of you told me the cards work with broadcast DTV, but
>if I orderget cable or satellite TV, can I also plug cable
>TV and satellite TV signal to the card and enjoy more
>channel programming?

Cable yes, satellite no, except that you could feed the NTSC
(composite or S-Video) output of your satellite receiver or any other
legacy A/V source into an input on the card. It wouldn't be HD.

It's also important to understand that the MDP-130 only decodes
UNSCRAMBLED cable. It will not show you scrambled channels even if
you subscribe to them. Typically you'll only get the local broadcast
stations and maybe some advertising channels. Some people have
reported getting more, but don't count on it. It depends on your
cable company. When I got my first HD tuner (the LG) I got several
premium movie channels including HBO-HD. That didn't last. If it
had, I wouldn't mention it in a public forum.

Del Mibbler
!