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For you rich people, Sharp unveils 65" LCD TV

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Anonymous
June 3, 2005 4:10:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Sharp unveils largest LCD TV
Company says it will sell a 65-inch screen for $15,520 beginning in
August.
June 3, 2005: 6:27 AM EDT

TOKYO (Reuters) - Sharp Corp. said Friday it would begin selling a 65-
inch liquid crystal display (LCD) television, the biggest in the world,
encroaching on the turf of Matsushita Electric Industrial and other
makers of plasma TVs.

Sharp, the world's largest LCD TV producer, already markets a 45-inch
model and is keen to expand its footprint in the fast-growing market for
flat TVs above 40 inches, a segment now dominated by plasma and rear-
projection models.

The Osaka-based company said it would launch the 65-inch TV in August in
Japan with an expected selling price of ¥1.68 million ($15,520). It
plans to introduce the TV in the United States and other overseas
markets by the end of this year.

At a packed news conference in Tokyo, Sharp also unveiled a series of
new sets ranging from 22 to 45 inches that are equipped with an advanced
backlight for improved color production, and said it would launch TVs in
the 50-inch range by the end of 2005.

"From small sizes to large sizes, the TV market belongs to liquid
crystal displays," Takashi Okuda, corporate director and general manager
of Sharp's audiovisual systems group, told reporters after the briefing.

Sharp's suggested price is below the ¥1.85 million being charged for
Matsushita's 65-inch model on a retailer's Web site. And unlike Sharp's
TV, Matsushita's display is not equipped with a tuner, which must be
purchased separately to watch broadcast TV.

The announcement could force Matsushita to lower the price of its 65-
inch plasma display and may pressure some LCD TV makers as well. South
Korea's LG Electronics, for example, currently markets a 55-inch LCD
television for about $19,000.

But it is still too expensive for most consumers and is priced well
above some similarly sized sets in the United States, where a plasma TV
above 60 inches can be found for under $10,000.

And as Sharp plans initially to produce only 300 65-inch TVs per month,
the new set is unlikely to boost profits in the near term. Most of the
4.0 million LCD sets it expects to sell in the current business year to
March are in the 20- to 40-inch range.

But introducing the world's largest LCD set could help Sharp in what has
become a heated public relations war.

In March, South Korea's Samsung Electronics Co. announced it had
developed an 82-inch LCD panel. Matsushita, meanwhile, has organized
meetings with the media in an attempt to emphasize the merits of plasma
over LCD.

"Sharp's real aim at this point is not to sell a lot of 65-inch TVs. The
announcement is a message showing the market that it is making
technological advancements," said Hisakazu Torii, director of TV market
research at DisplaySearch Japan.

"The real key for Sharp is how much it can cut production costs and
lower prices for 45-inch and 37-inch TVs."

Sharp said its 65-inch TV was better than similarly sized plasma sets
because unlike plasma models it can produce an image with resolution of
1,920 horizontal by 1,080 vertical pixels.

Matsushita's 65-inch set, for example, produces 1,366 by 768 pixels of
resolution.
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 4:10:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 12:10:03 GMT, RobH <Rob@aol.com> wrote:

>Sharp unveils largest LCD TV
>Company says it will sell a 65-inch screen for $15,520 beginning in
>August.
>June 3, 2005: 6:27 AM EDT


Ok, so how may stuck pixels do you have to have before you can
exchange your $15,000+ purchase ?
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 4:10:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

http://www.iht.com/articles/2005/06/01/business/tv.php

Searching for thinner, and cheaper, TVs
By Hiawatha Bray The Boston Globe
THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 2005

The television business is going flat.

Like a slowly leaking tire, sales of traditional TV sets, with their
bulky, lead-lined cathode-ray tubes, or CRTs, are on the wane.
Meanwhile, consumers are going into debt to pay for flat-panel TVs that
are thin enough to hang on a wall and wide enough to simulate the look
of a movie theater.

And the world's leading electronics firms are racing to build flat TVs
cheap enough to buy without taking out a second mortgage.

Some consumers can't wait. Americans bought 3.4 million flat TV sets
last year, an increase of 116 percent, according to the Consumer
Electronics Association. Old-style TVs did far better, with 19.9
million sold, but that number was down 4.4 percent.

"Consumers are attracted to that thin-form factor," said Ross Rubin, an
industry analyst for NPD Group. "It really blends into their living
room aesthetic much better."

But it's murder on the family budget. A good 32-inch flat TV measuring
32 inches, or 81 centimeters, will cost around $2,000, compared with
about $600 for a CRT set. CRT tubes are cheap to make, while producing
flat displays is a complex and grueling task.

The Japanese makers Fujitsu and Hitachi invested $674 million last year
to build a plasma manufacturing line, and LCD factories can cost as
much $2 billion, about the same as a plant for making computer chips.
But computer chips are tiny, and each production cycle at a chip plant
produces thousands of them; that's why your desktop PC is so cheap. TV
screens are big, so only a few can be made at a time, keeping costs per
unit high.

So engineers are seeking ways to crank out flat screens as cheaply as
old-style picture tubes. That is why the convention of the Society for
Information Display was as much a scientific gathering as a trade fair
last week in Boston. While visitors gaped at gigantic new flat TVs,
leading scientists and engineers from the industry huddled in back
rooms, comparing notes on new techniques for building bigger, flatter
sets that will sell at lower prices.

Samsung offered one solution: an organic light-emitting diode screen,
or OLED. This type of screen is already in service in many late-model
cellphones. It's cheap to make and produces brilliant color. Besides,
it doesn't need a backlight, as LCD screens do, because the materials
generate their own light when exposed to electricity.

Kyuha Chung, a Samsung vice president, showed off a 32-inch OLED
screen.

"It can go very thin," Chung said. "This particular one is about three
centimeters thick" - slightly more than an inch.

Eventually, Chung said, Samsung hopes to make an OLED just one
millimeter thick that could be mounted on a plastic surface to create a
flexible TV set. Thanks to the lack of a backlight, Chung said, a
40-inch OLED set would use no more than 70 watts of electricity,
compared with 200 watts for the same size LCD.

IFire Technology, based in Toronto, pushed its own solution, a system
that would spray a light-emitting chemical between two layers of
electrodes. The company is building a pilot plant to start producing
sample panels this year and hopes to be in full production by 2007. Don
Carkner, vice president for product planning, said the iFire process
could produce 37-inch panels for about $300 each, which should result
in retail prices of less than $1,000.

Perhaps the most radical idea came from Motorola, which has developed a
way to grow carbon nanotubes that work like the electron guns in an
old-fashioned picture tube, except that each dot of light on the screen
would have its own separate gun. Vida Ilderem, director of Motorola's
physical sciences laboratory, said Motorola wanted to license the
technology to makers of LCD and plasma screens, who could quickly add
it to existing production lines.

"If the partner has the manufacturing line all there, it could take 18
to 24 months," Ilderem said.

According to the Web site of The MIT Technology Review, the industry
research firm DisplaySearch says the nanotube system could lead in a
few years to 40-inch TVs costing about $800. That is a price that would
let middle-class consumers thin out their TV sets, instead of their
wallets.
Related resources
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 4:10:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

At least 5 in a given area, dependent if it is in the centre or peripheral
areas of the display. Same Q/C as on the smaller items.
<s_long@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:for0a1920se5f2j7s12j9m3se6djlri2op@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 12:10:03 GMT, RobH <Rob@aol.com> wrote:
>
>>Sharp unveils largest LCD TV
>>Company says it will sell a 65-inch screen for $15,520 beginning in
>>August.
>>June 3, 2005: 6:27 AM EDT
>
>
> Ok, so how may stuck pixels do you have to have before you can
> exchange your $15,000+ purchase ?
>
>
June 3, 2005 6:52:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 3 Jun 2005 11:45:24 -0400, "Art" <plotsligt@comcast.net>
wrote:

>At least 5 in a given area, dependent if it is in the centre or peripheral
>areas of the display. Same Q/C as on the smaller items.
><s_long@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:for0a1920se5f2j7s12j9m3se6djlri2op@4ax.com...
>> On Fri, 03 Jun 2005 12:10:03 GMT, RobH <Rob@aol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>Sharp unveils largest LCD TV
>>>Company says it will sell a 65-inch screen for $15,520 beginning in
>>>August.
>>>June 3, 2005: 6:27 AM EDT
>>
>>
>> Ok, so how may stuck pixels do you have to have before you can
>> exchange your $15,000+ purchase ?
>>
>>
Good news. In a few years it ought to be affordable enough to replace
my 65" Hitachi. It's awfully hard to go smaller when replacing a big
screen.
Thumper
June 28, 2011 11:40:28 AM

Panasonic has a 152'' plasma for 1/2 million...
!