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what is SAS can't find much bout it on the net

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November 23, 2008 7:22:11 PM

i was looking at some of the newer socket 1366 motherboards and was wondering. what exactly is SAS i read the wiki on it but it was a little greek to me.

was wondering what some benifits of it might be?

can scsi drives be installed on a SAS controller?

i have 2x 36gb raptors raid-0 that recently where rma so they have new function but are sata 1.

i also have some high capacity storage drives like a 500gb 32mb cache seagate
and a 1 teribyte drive32mb cache
and am thinking bout getting another 500gb for a raid. or possably 2 1tb drives in the next 3 months. I may even make these drives in a NAS device but hav'nt did my reading up on that yet.

im a fanatic of hard drive speed since it usally is a bottle neck and am gonna build a new core i7 system and was wondering what use i may have for SAS i kinda did'nt understand some of what wiki was saying, not even sure if it was very accurate.

if someone could tell my the benifits of it that be great?

also if someone knows what some of the best uses for it would be?

More about : sas find bout net

a b G Storage
November 23, 2008 7:59:16 PM

Having had a look at the Wikipedia entry, it seems that SAS is the next generation of SATA. Whilst SATA is closely related to the older ATA, SAS is closer to SCSI.

Main advantage seem to be a higher potential throughput in situations where there is a large amount of simultaneous access to a drive. In other words, just like SCSI, SAS is ideal in critical server applications where such situations are common. This wouldn't be nearly so important in a workstation where it's less likely that several sources will be accessing a disk at the same time. Also you can use longer cables, but that's unlikely to matter in a stand-alone PC.

Main disadvantage is cost - exactly the same as the situation with SCSI compared to ATA. On the other hand, you can use second generation SATA drives with a SAS controller, so you may consider it future-proofing to buy a SAS equipped motherboard. As I understand it you can't use SCSI drives with a SAS controller. I see that a 300Gb SAS disk costs $2843.75 from a typical supplier, so you may find the cost factor an important one.

I should emphasize that this is just my take on the Wikipedia article. I have no direct experience of SAS drives. Hopefully someone with such experience can amplify this for you.

The best uses for SAS would seem to be to build the fastest possible server for mission critical situations, or to relieve yourself of a large amount of hard-earned money.
a c 82 G Storage
November 23, 2008 8:01:14 PM

The main benefit of SAS drives is their speed (up to 15K) and low latency. Their best use is in enterprise level high performance RAIDs. Check Tom's Hardware 2.5" Enterprise Hard Drive Charts and StorageReview.com for performance comparisons with other drives. While SAS drives are fast, top of the line Flash SSD drives are even faster (and obviously more expensive).
Related resources
November 24, 2008 2:33:14 AM

ok, thanks
November 24, 2008 3:00:35 AM

WINTERLORD said:
i was looking at some of the newer socket 1366 motherboards and was wondering. what exactly is SAS i read the wiki on it but it was a little greek to me.

was wondering what some benifits of it might be?

can scsi drives be installed on a SAS controller?

i have 2x 36gb raptors raid-0 that recently where rma so they have new function but are sata 1.

i also have some high capacity storage drives like a 500gb 32mb cache seagate
and a 1 teribyte drive32mb cache
and am thinking bout getting another 500gb for a raid. or possably 2 1tb drives in the next 3 months. I may even make these drives in a NAS device but hav'nt did my reading up on that yet.

im a fanatic of hard drive speed since it usally is a bottle neck and am gonna build a new core i7 system and was wondering what use i may have for SAS i kinda did'nt understand some of what wiki was saying, not even sure if it was very accurate.

if someone could tell my the benifits of it that be great?

also if someone knows what some of the best uses for it would be?


SAS is an acronym for Serial Attached SCSI.

I cannot find a 1366 MB with a built-in controller, but I'd be interested to look at any links you might provide....
November 24, 2008 6:27:48 PM

Already found them, thanks. Changes my Nehalem build somewhat...
a c 82 G Storage
November 24, 2008 6:59:58 PM

Going with SAS disks?
November 24, 2008 7:15:08 PM

Two Hitachi 147G enterprise class. Need another case fan.
a b G Storage
November 24, 2008 7:34:02 PM

Oops - the only SAS drives that I could find first time around were a ridiculous price. Those Hitachi ones are much nearer the mark - still a bit more than SATA drives, though.
a c 82 G Storage
November 24, 2008 8:55:50 PM

Enterprise class SAS drives are much faster than SATA drives (random access in particular), therefore you should expect to pay more. They're very nice in a RAID configuration for a database server. On the other hand, I wouldn't use them for a desktop PC - 15K drives are nowhere near silent. For desktop PCs, a VelociRaptor might be a better and less expensive choice.
a b G Storage
November 25, 2008 7:34:02 AM

Quote:
15K drives are nowhere near silent
Don't I just know that! Used to look after a server room with four racks stuffed full of servers. Like standing on the runway at Heathrow.
!