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Any negatives on DLP sets???

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Anonymous
June 6, 2005 12:23:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.

Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
in, I hear DLP sets are best for this. Want to get the full effect of "God
of War" for PS2.....

Anyhow, does anyone who has a DLP set or anyone else have any horror stories
with this technology???

More about : negatives dlp sets

Anonymous
June 6, 2005 12:23:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Nuisance Failure on most brands are the lamps, some manufacturers have other
issues that are endemic to their specific design. Scan the other posts in
this and other N/G and check out the A/V Groups for a lot more viable
information about specific items. Overall they produce a rather nice result
with appropiate input and hookups. Shop Wisely, it is your $$!
"Krisma" <krismaNOSPAM@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:sKToe.4331$zT2.884@trndny04...
> Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
>
> Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
> in, I hear DLP sets are best for this. Want to get the full effect of "God
> of War" for PS2.....
>
> Anyhow, does anyone who has a DLP set or anyone else have any horror
> stories with this technology???
>
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 12:23:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Krisma" <krismaNOSPAM@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:sKToe.4331$zT2.884@trndny04...
> Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
>
> Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
> in, I hear DLP sets are best for this.

Some people see rainbows, which ruins the viewing experience for them.
Manufacturers claim that they have reduced this recently. It would be a
good idea to look at a few in different stores to see how your eyes react.

Myself, I don't see rainbows but find the images to be unrealistically
sharp. I find D-ILA and LCD more comfortable and realistic (neither of these
have burn-in either).

If I was buying DLP I'd probably prefer Toshiba over Samsung for reliability
reasons.
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Anonymous
June 6, 2005 12:59:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Krisma wrote:
> Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
>
> Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
> in, I hear DLP sets are best for this. Want to get the full effect of "God
> of War" for PS2.....
>
> Anyhow, does anyone who has a DLP set or anyone else have any horror stories
> with this technology???

Yes. Current DLP RP TVs all use a single DLP chip with a rotating
color wheel to generate the colors. The display screen is flashing
between red, green, and blue at a high rate which most people don't
notice. However, some people see this rainbow effect (RBE) of the
changing colors and it bothers them. Some people have also reported that
after they learned how to see the RBE, they can't help but see it. There
have also been a few posts to the RPTV forum at www.avsforum.com from
people who have gotten headaches after a while watching the DLP RPTV and
ended up returning the TV.

But don't over react to my warnings as most people don't ever notice
the RBE. Do some extended testing in the store - say watch the DLP RPTVs
for 15-20 minutes - to see if bothers you and anyone else in your
family. If it doesn't, then you may be fine.

Other drawbacks to DLP RPTVs, which is true of all microdisplay RPTVs,
are expensive light bulbs - $250+ - which have to be replaced
periodically as well as limited viewing angle especially along the
vertical axis. The manufacturers - Samsung - have claimed 8000 hours
lifespan for the bulbs, but from the reports I have seen, figure on 4 to
5 thousand hours before the bulb needs to be replaced. If you spend $$
to get an ESP, make sure it covers bulb replacements.

Alan F
June 6, 2005 2:44:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Krisma wrote:
> Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
>
> Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
> in, I hear DLP sets are best for this. Want to get the full effect of "God
> of War" for PS2.....
>
> Anyhow, does anyone who has a DLP set or anyone else have any horror stories
> with this technology???
>
>
They use an internal spinning filter wheel which gives SOME viewers a
headache and they see a "rainbow" effect in the picture. Don't buy one
before you spend time in a store watching one. Blacks and contrast are
other issues it shares with LCD & plasma sets.
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 7:12:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Dave Gower" <davegow.removethis.@magma.ca> wrote in message
news:BridnWm-DqOpqznfRVn-tA@magma.ca...
>
> "Krisma" <krismaNOSPAM@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
> news:sKToe.4331$zT2.884@trndny04...
> > Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
> >
> > Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about
burn
> > in, I hear DLP sets are best for this.
>
> Some people see rainbows, which ruins the viewing experience for them.
> Manufacturers claim that they have reduced this recently. It would be a
> good idea to look at a few in different stores to see how your eyes react.
>
> Myself, I don't see rainbows but find the images to be unrealistically
> sharp. I find D-ILA and LCD more comfortable and realistic (neither of
these
> have burn-in either).
>
> If I was buying DLP I'd probably prefer Toshiba over Samsung for
reliability
> reasons.
>
>
I think the use of "rainbows" for brevity results in a misleading
description of what can happen with sequenced R, G, and B fields. It reminds
me of teen-ager's favorite way to describe microwave-oven cooking as
"nuking", again for brevity. As a result some people are deathly afraid of
using a microwave oven, thinking it involves nuclear radiation which would
indeed be dangerous if it were truly the case. "Rainbows" only happen when
action in a scene is fast or when the viewer's eyesight shifts rapidly
(sounds like it might happen often in game playing). It also requires rather
specific scene illumination of a bright element in an overall dim scene, and
takes place when the bright spot moves rapidly or the viewer's eyes shift
rapidly, leaving persistence-of-vision color spots or trails from the bright
spot against the dim background. A typical situation of occurrence might be
flashing lights from police vehicles at night. Of course, it's because the
bright white spot was painted on screen by a sequence of R, G and B colored
spots, and rapid eye movement can separate them so the colors are visible.

When I was shopping for a 60" set, I had the DLP in my home for a couple of
days - - long enough to decide I didn't want to live with the RGB sequence
effect for the next umpteen years. At that time, also, Samsung couldn't get
the "green" out of their "whites". Even today, I still see a greenish tint
to the picture in some DLP sets, which I think is really unfortunate. The
technology shouldn't have to be saddled with such correctable set-up errors.
Also, at that earlier time, the resolution of brightness values was 8 bits
(256 values), and since peak white brightness was unusually high in those
days, a lot of the brightness resolution was taken up in just setting a
level of contrast that avoided blindingly bright whites for the evening's
viewing. The result was a terrible loss of intensity resolution, resulting
in visible stepping of color gradations, mostly affecting darker, like some
skin tone areas, in the picture. Today, there may be more bits (12 or 16)
of intensity resolution to start with, so that taking off the top 2 or 3
bits to reduce the brightest whites to 1/4 or 1/8 of their maximum intensity
won't lose the fine gradation we expect in a high quality TV picture. But
you might need to be aware of the possibility, so that some cost-cutting
manufacturer can't sneak in an old 8-bit system which looks just fine on
most brightly lit scenes, in the daytime.

Chuck
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 10:03:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chuck Olson" <chuckolson01@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote in message
news:et-dnZyuD9ICVznfRVn-pA@comcast.com...
> When I was shopping for a 60" set, I had the DLP in my home for a couple
> of
> days - - long enough to decide I didn't want to live with the RGB sequence
> effect for the next umpteen years.

Curious what the difference will be with the new 1080P sets that are
forthcoming with 7 segment color wheels rotating at 10,800 RPM?
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 10:35:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Thanks for all of your responses, I'll be spending time in the store
watching the set for the rainbow effect.


"Krisma" <krismaNOSPAM@NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:sKToe.4331$zT2.884@trndny04...
> Getting a new job and a big raise, considering buying a DLP HDTV set.
>
> Looking for a set which I can play video games on and not worry about burn
> in, I hear DLP sets are best for this. Want to get the full effect of "God
> of War" for PS2.....
>
> Anyhow, does anyone who has a DLP set or anyone else have any horror
> stories with this technology???
>
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 10:37:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Krisma wrote:
> Thanks for all of your responses, I'll be spending time in the store
> watching the set for the rainbow effect.

Just keep in mind also that the huge majority of DLP owners (myself
included) have never seen a "rainbow". Obviously, some people do see
them - especially after teaching themselves to - but most of us just
watch our sets and enjoy them. I've had my Samsung set for 18 months
now, and I remain delighted with it.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 1:49:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chuck Olson" <chuckolson01@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote

>..."Rainbows" only happen when
> action in a scene is fast or when the viewer's eyesight shifts rapidly
> (sounds like it might happen often in game playing). It also requires
> rather
> specific scene illumination of a bright element in an overall dim scene,
> and
> takes place when the bright spot moves rapidly or the viewer's eyes shift
> rapidly, leaving persistence-of-vision color spots or trails from the
> bright
> spot against the dim background.

Appreciate this information, but do we have any idea if wobulation will
affect this? (For the uninitiated, this is an incoming technology where
every second image is displaced a half pixel, making a smoother picture).
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 3:35:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I like the description that the previous poster made on the "RBE" very
concise. I have a Samsung HLR4677w and I'm very pleased with the
quality and picture.

I can see the "RBE" if I want to, and I can train myself not to look
for it as well. My wife doesn't see it at all. To see it on purpose -
like the previous poster described - Look for a Dim scene with a bright
white light area and look quickly away from the TV and back, you will
probably see the "RBE".

But for normal watching - if I'm just absorbing what is on the screen -
I don't tend to get the "RBE".

The HLR Models are the third generation from Samsung and I'm really
satisfied with the HD Picture with my Upconverting 1080i DVD Player -
I'm using the HDMI interface for the connection.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 6:37:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dave Gower wrote:
> Appreciate this information, but do we have any idea if wobulation will
> affect this? (For the uninitiated, this is an incoming technology where
> every second image is displaced a half pixel, making a smoother picture).

I thought they had been doing wobulation since last year with the
introduction of the HD3 chipset. The wobulation allows them to use each
mirror to generate two pixels, flipping between two well offset angles
at a high rate of speed.

So long as they use a color wheel, there will be a rainbow effect. The
effect can be minimized by using another color - dark green, IIRC in
filter location on the wheel for better blacks, higher rpm speed,
improved processing software, but it will still be there.

I spent a lot of time researching for an HD TV last year. I did
consider the DLP and LCD RPTVs, but ended up getting a Panasonic 42" HD
commercial plasma monitor. But that was my decision, other people may
choose to go DLP RPTV especially if they want a really big screen for
less than $5K.

Alan F
!