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Missing 138GB from my 1.5TB Hard drive. Is this normal?

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December 14, 2008 4:58:55 AM

Hey, I finally just got the 1.5TB Seagate hard drive that was advertised a few weeks ago on slickdeals. I hooked it up through my Jmicron SATA port using (Basic mode and Bootrom enabled).

When I booted windows, I used GUID Partition on it, but it only shows 1397.14GB Unpartitioned space free.

When I try to create a new volume, it shows 1430670 Megabytes available.

Is this normal? I know that you actually don't get the full capacity in hard drives, but 103GB missing? Where did my other 138 Gigabytes go?

Basically... is this normal?

Thanks.
December 14, 2008 5:18:54 AM

yeah its weird


basically what happens is advertisers 1 gb = 1,000,000 bytes

whereas the computer reads 1gb as 1,024,000 bytes or somewhere around there.
December 14, 2008 5:23:54 AM

Maybe you should try the seagate tools to do the format. My rough calculation shows that you should have ~1460000 MB available. There will be some reserved space for bad clusters, but..... Maybe you should also run Seagate's diag tools first as a precaution.














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a b G Storage
December 14, 2008 5:44:59 AM

Actually, 1,500,000,000,000 bytes is equal to:
1,464,843,750 kilobytes (original/1024)
1,430,511.47 megabytes (original/(1024^2))
1,396.98386 gigabytes (original/(1024^3)
1.36424205 terabytes (original/(1024^4))
(this is how the OS measures it)

Note that as you get to larger and larger measurements, the error actually seems to grow. Your drive is fine.
December 14, 2008 11:57:57 PM

I was actually hoping that mfgs would wake up with SSD's on this phenomena but alas they have not :(  still trying to get the most from our money.
December 15, 2008 12:10:04 AM

Heya,

It's normal.

You may be surprised to know your ram isn't exactly 4.0 gigabytes, or whatever value you choose, either.

What's listed in Windows, what's formated and listed, and what is actually there are always different. General rule of thumb is that if you buy an HDD, the listed capacity is rounded up for sales.

Cheers,
a b G Storage
December 15, 2008 1:04:22 AM

The RAM is specified as binary though, so it's read in Windows as much closer to the value stated on the package.

Oh, and Chookman, I'm pretty sure it's going the other way. I think some of the SSD manufacturers are starting to use decimal measurements to label their SSDs.
December 15, 2008 4:39:14 AM

cjl said:
The RAM is specified as binary though, so it's read in Windows as much closer to the value stated on the package.

Oh, and Chookman, I'm pretty sure it's going the other way. I think some of the SSD manufacturers are starting to use decimal measurements to label their SSDs.



Oh i sure hope so, at least it will cut down on posts like this lol
a b G Storage
December 15, 2008 10:08:10 PM

Not really. Since SSD manufacturers are starting to use decimal measurements, even SSDs will have this problem. An 80GB Intel SSD will actually read as 74.5GB in Windows for example.
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